Your opinions please.

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Jeff C, Mar 5, 2009.

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  1. Jeff C

    Jeff C Registered User
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    May 26, 2005
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    I have had this Ingraham mantle for some time now. I rebuilt the movement and cleaned up the case only. The trim pieces including the feet had all their plating worn off and I left it that way but you could hardly see them, they were almost black in color. I found this Gold leaf paint at the local big box craft store and gave it a try. Well the look in itself is very good in my opinion but has it now made this particular clock look out of balance, gaudy per say?

    Interested it what other may have to say

    Regards,
     

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  2. inbeat

    inbeat Registered User
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    My personal taste does not run in the bright gold vein. I would rather clean the feet and other "gold" pieces, and then if they looked bad, use something like "rub n' buff" on them....put it on with a q tip and then buff it off...it lets some of the original look come out without looking so bright.
    JMHO
     
  3. Jeff C

    Jeff C Registered User
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    I'm a little in that camp as well. I do wonder if there is any product or home procedure I can perform that would age these pieces a bit especially in the low points or cracks.
     
  4. Anvil2k9

    Anvil2k9 Registered User

    Jan 27, 2009
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    #4 Anvil2k9, Mar 5, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2009
    very very nice clock in the right place,
    and injury to the eyes vice versa, tawdrily.

    the Western (and Arabic) perception of gold
    is showing and looking at in the sun hence
    a permanent exposure to light.

    the Eastern/Chinese is the opposite. gilded
    furniture or shrines are put in dark places of
    the house to catch and reflect the shafts
    of sunlight. that twilight makes often
    even the cheapest products looking
    gorgeous.

    regards
    Damian
     
  5. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    Dec 9, 2006
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    I rather suspect you think it's to gaudy or you would not be asking about it. If you think it's to bright you can still use a darker Rub-N-Buff to tone it down and give it a more antique look. Very nice clock.
     
  6. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

    Feb 12, 2009
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    Jeff,
    you can try this:
    Get matt (flat) black enamel paint from a modelling shop.
    Like Testor's, Humbrol or Revell, doesn't matter.
    Stirr it up very well and dip in the tip of the paint brush (Size 00)
    about 1/3rd.
    Then dip the brush into thinner. Just touch a piece of cardboard to get
    off some excess thinner.
    Now just let this paint-thinner-stuff FLOW on to the insides of the curves
    and crevices of the ornaments and feet. It works real quick and follows the
    deeper edges by itself.
    You can increase the paint "fading in" if you give one follow-up stroke with
    the brush. Always do one area at a time and remember all in all your just using a couple of big drops, so don't drench everything :)
    IMO it gives a pretty good kind of antique looking and it's really more easy done than reading this...
    Jurgen
     
  7. CZHACK

    CZHACK Registered User

    Apr 28, 2005
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    Can I assume that you did not refinish the center of the dial? To my eye you have three (two for sure ) gold shades (inner, outer dial rings and hardware) which is the problem. Try matching the gold shade of the inner ring and you would have a better match to the original. Mike
     
  8. Barrymac

    Barrymac Registered User
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    Sep 8, 2004
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    I agree you might not match the new and old shades of gold but here is my antiquing method. First spray the pieces with rust colored primer. This is very similar in color to the gesso? used under gold leaf. When this is dry apply your gold (not too thick). I usually use spray paint but there are probably better choices. When this dries rub it gently with fine steel wool to reveal some of the primer, esp. on the areas that would be worn from 100 years of being dusted. Coat it all with brown or black shoe polish. Then buff this with a rag or soft brush. You should have the 3 colors showing in different places. The dark should stay in the low points mixed with the muted gold and high spots should show the primer as if the gold (leaf) had worn off there.
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    I would do something similar to what Barry recommends. I might go a step furthur and do a light rubdown with 4-0 steel wool, posibly using a bit of mineral spirits. Pick a mild solvent that will actually remove some of the new paint from the high spots.

    Ceramic workers call this process 'mudding'. Basicly just taking the 'edge' of something that looks to new and bright.

    Willie X
     
  10. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    It's fine just like it is. I wouldn't do anything to it. I've used similar products before and in six months that bright new look will be noticably darker and duller. After a year or two of natural aging it will blend right in and look much more natural.

    Bob C.
     
  11. CZHACK

    CZHACK Registered User

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    In any event, I suggest that all gold surfaces are the same shade which would have been the same as when it was new. The problem will be multiple shades that draw the eye to the differences. Mike
     
  12. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    If it's OK for you, Jeff, then it's OK. It matters not what others think; such things are entirely subjective, so you'll get as many different answers as there are posts.

    It looks fine by me, but that's only an opinion; there is no right or wrong about such things.

    Should I eat an apple or a pear? ;)

    Oh yeah - nice clock!
     
  13. laprade

    laprade Registered User

    Sep 10, 2008
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    the best paint for giving the proper fake metal look is metalic car body spray.

    first spray the parts with a light bright colour and when dry then spray with a darker metalic spray; before it dries wipe the paint off the high areas.

    the effect is quite good.

    the trouble with the many gold paints sold to be brushed on, is that they always look like as if your auntie Mary had a go at it.


    I have used a combination of car spray paint on a number of accasions when with great success.
     
  14. Thyme

    Thyme Banned

    Sep 18, 2006
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    So-called 'gold leaf paint' isn't gold.What it is is a paint made with bronze powder. It is never an acceptable substitute for real gold leaf. I have had situations where I had to remove it from wood columns that were originally gold leafed and apply actual leaf.

    However, in this case it is acceptable because the metal work was probably with a bronze tone finish when it was made - but it does look a bit too new, and some might even say gaudy, because it doesn't blend in well with the level of age or patina of the rest of the piece.

    Try the Rub-n-buff alternative. I've never used it, but others here have said they are very pleased with the results. :)
     
  15. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Looks fine to me. "Too gaudy?" Well, the clock's design itself, is gaudy - ornate - bohemian - and since it is, the feet match the theme - gauche.
     
  16. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Moderator
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    Exactly, my experience as well Bob! Besides, re-finishing them to look like they haven't been re-finished seems like a waste of time to me. Of cause, you could throw a few coats of wax mixed with dirt on the rest of the case if you really want to get that un-touched look back.:) Patina, just another work for dirty!:rolleyes:
     
  17. Thyme

    Thyme Banned

    Sep 18, 2006
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    <sigh> When I was younger and less experienced, I used to think the same way.

    No, as I've said here before, patina and filth are NOT the same thing and patina is not just a fancy term for filth. So let us not say that all patina is "just another work (sic: word) for dirty". In some cases, as with bronzes, if you remove the patina (usually along with destroying the original finish) you really will ruin the value of the piece.

    Esthetically, if any restoration is to be pleasing, it needs to fit in with what is already there, at the same level, so the parts that are the restoration do not protrude or seem blatantly obvious. This does not mean throwing mud at an antique to reduce the overall look to that of overall squalor (although I'm sure that's also been done to attract a certain type of buyer). :rolleyes:

    What I'm trying to say is that, visually, the restorative work should not scream NEW WORK at the the observer. Nor should your restoration be done with intent to fool anyone. It should blend in, fit and compliment the overall character of the piece - and that requires good judgment, artistic sensibility and applying a sense of aesthetics.
     

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