WW83 Bearings and clean up/paint job

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by measuretwice, Dec 28, 2019.

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  1. measuretwice

    measuretwice Registered User

    Jul 28, 2019
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    I'm fairly new here, and come to watch clocks as a bit of a newb, but with a fairly in depth machining background. An admitted toolaholic, watches and clocks are another reason to acquire more tools. I've got a bunch watchmakers/instruments lathes and just recently added this Boley & Leinen WW83. It came up for sale on the other side of the country, but a daughter was living locally and dutifully picked it up lugged it to a UPS store. I didn't realize how heavy it was when I asked the favour - still owe her for that! It cleaned up nicely and I thought the good members here would like to see some photos.

    The lathe was really well accessorized, 2 slide rests, vertical slide with milling and dividing attachment and the, I imagine, rarish threading attachment with all the gears. It needed a lot of cleaning and a paint job. I've a new respect for artists, its bloody difficult to get a colour how you want from mixing. Everything was disassembled, masked and painting was with an airbrush.

    The spindle bearings seemed dicey and the OEM's on these are deep groove but its a nice upgrade to install super precision angular contact bearings. I splurged for matched ABEC 7 SKF's and made ground bearing spacers. The bearings on the motor and jack shaft were also replaced. Everything seemed in great shape. The last photo is cutting a 40TPI thread.

    The motor and speed control are less than desirable on this lathe imo so I'm just using the motor as a counter shaft (brushes removed). Powered is from a Consew servo motor which is nice - it senses the speed and puts more current into the motor to maintain the speed under load. It also gives very low speeds which are advantageous for threading. The only complaint is controls....reversing is a pita (needed for threading). I hacked the control so I can switch between foot and rheostat controls, but still haven't figured out an easy way to reverse things.

    0svdTkn.jpg

    turning a spacer on a bigger lathe and checking the spacer's fit in the headstock bore

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  2. John MacArthur

    John MacArthur Registered User
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    Feb 13, 2007
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    Slurp slurp drool.....
    Johnny
     
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  3. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
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    Feb 5, 2007
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    Fantastic work!
     
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  4. measuretwice

    measuretwice Registered User

    Jul 28, 2019
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    Thanks Gents, it was great find and I feel fortunate to be its current custodian
     
  5. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

    Mar 29, 2011
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    Having all that in one, presumably original, set with matching numbers, I suppose, is extremely rare. Good find ! I would be curious to know, how you had to pay for it.

    My jealousy is somewhat tempered by the fact that I own a similar set by their erstwhile competitors Lorch, Schmidt & Co. ...
     
  6. sharukh

    sharukh Registered User
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    Oct 10, 2011
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    And some more drooling. But seriously, that is a fantastic piece.

    Sharukh.
     
  7. Betzel

    Betzel Registered User

    Dec 1, 2010
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    Wow.

    Yeah, the 83 cast iron base is the heaviest of the bunch from this period, but stays put. You're lucky to have found it with all of that tooling and the thread cutting set complete, clean, boxed and in one sale. Guess you did not get a snake-light that attaches to the back via three screws? Also seeing the sheet paper, did you get a "white face pad" (Article no. 7296-43) for the tool rests - fits in the holes. You may not do a lot of freehand cutting.

    My 83 is stripped down, older, and uglier! but very similar. I got it for $700 with only a few accessories, but the fine accessory spindle was cut off at the motor mount (to fit under a shelf?). I had some collets and chucks, etc. from another nickel B&L, so it all worked out. My OEM motor is also weak, bogs down under load and the rheo is almost gone. My reverse is in the motor, so no switch on that center plate like yours, so I put a "slingshot" pulley there. Ugly, but functional.

    Your idea is far better... Looks like you have everything, but many of the taper angles and other data are given in old Flume / Boley GMBH catalogs, and the Prätecma catalogs. Let me know if you want them? Were there just two deep groove ball bearings inside (originally) that you replaced? Also, what was inside, under the original roundhead "oel" screw when you broke the headstock down? An inverted "V" wick into the ball cages?

    Not sure if you have made the leap into horology, but, if you want to give clockmaking a shot, this board is great, and I'd recommend JM Wildings books and videos by clickspring on youtube if they are new to you. Pocket watches are not fashionable, but Steffen Pahlow's channel is another good resource if you want to try a tourbillon. Might be inspirational? Also, there are a few guys from the yahoo mini lathe horology group (what's left of it) making micro (ceramic/steel) ball-bearing enabled tallcase regulators and whatnot. And, if you have not seen it, please check out Mark Frank's almost completed astro-skeleton by Buchanan. MY CURRENT PROJECT 3-ASTRO INTRO Another level.

    Nice paint job for a guy who's (maybe) not in the auto body business! The old stuff is almost washing machine quality. How's the paint holding up?
     
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  8. measuretwice

    measuretwice Registered User

    Jul 28, 2019
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    #8 measuretwice, Sep 24, 2020
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2020
    Thanks for the kind comments

    There was a spacer that goes into the head stock with a half round groove carrying a felt wick. I replicated that with the spacer I made...I probably have a photo of the OEM somewhere but am at the office now. Originally they were deep groove ball bearings and I upgraded mine to angular contact bearings. The have the obvious axial advantages and are also easier to source in the higher accuracies; i.e. I used SKF super precision P4's whereas the same size in deep groove is at best a P5. Apparently with the SKF's, P4 is the minimum they meet, and supposedly are often better. I got matched pairs so fitting was fairly simple, just grind the two spacers and used the preload set by the matched pair.

    Paint job was done with a Paasche air brush and hardware store tremclad. I can, through work, get the unobtainable oil based paints but I'd need to buy a gallon. Tremclad is ok, easy to find and available in small tins for custom mixing. Its one of the few enamels that are still available retail. No autobody painting experience, just lots of sanding between coats and a hair trigger on a redo if doesn't look good :)

    Fairly much a beginner, I've serviced a few watches and repaired some clocks so have wet my feet a bit. Lots of book reading and reading here trying to learn. My machining knowledge really helps in coming up the curve but I've lots to learn - better understanding the mechanism and improving dexterity with watch work are two obvious areas. Its quite enjoyable as it utilizes some existing skills but all poses lots of new challenges. I don't get as much time at it as I'd like, still doing several machine tool reconditionings and have many model engineering projects on the go
     
  9. Betzel

    Betzel Registered User

    Dec 1, 2010
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    Thanks for the reply.

    Just a curiosity, as mine is in storage in the US and I'm in the EU. I had seen on a German tool forum where a guy took his 83 apart, so I saw some inside shots, but it seemed unclear if he was going to find the bearings and make the spacers needed to get it all back together, so he was stuck. He needs a friend with a juiced surface grinder!! All but one of the cone lathes I have are a functional mess, but the 83 runs nicely (even with the old bearings in synthetic oil left over from my TDI). So, I just left it alone.

    I don't think there is much hope to reform a heavily worn hard cone machine. I just use oil splatter shields ;-)
     

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