• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

WW2 Japanese clock for the instrument panel seiko

Apr 27, 2018
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I picked up a WWII Japanese flight clock from an instrument panel of a WWII aircraft that was used as a timepiece for Japanese aviators. They wore the clock around their necks from a parachute cord. From photos I've seen the "12" is at the bottom, so when the pilot looked at the clock it was readable. My clock has the "12" on the dial at the top. Might anyone know if these Army or Navy clocks were made both ways? My email is MJacobs784@aol.com.

s-l500 (1).jpg s-l500 (2).jpg
 

JTD

Registered User
Sep 27, 2005
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Welcome to the board.

Perhaps I am missing something but I am confused with your description. You say you got the clock 'from an instrument panel' but then you the aviators 'wore the clock around their necks with a parachute cord'. This clock clearly looks to have been attached to an instrument panel, why do you think it might have been worn around someone's neck.

Or have I misunderstood?

JTD
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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I understand now. I wonder if the movement can be turned in the case?

JTD
 

Kevin W.

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Apr 11, 2002
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I am guessing the clocks were expensive and if the plane was shot down, the clock could be lost. If around the neck, at least the man could parachute and save the clock. Just a guess on my part.
 

River rat

Registered User
Apr 4, 2009
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Here is a cool link for you. Most don't collect military half the time members don't believe some stuff that sounds off the wall about military time pieces and I have to proof them wrong like you did with wearing it around the neck knew that was true soon as I read this. A cool thread here.
Japanese Seikosha Aircraft clock.
My guess they only had enough clocks for when aircraft went on missions they all ways kept some aircraft in reserve some aircraft would get shot down some would go in for repairs due to mechanical problems and combat damage remember a war was going on metal ore for steel and aluminum was mined else were and came by ship to Japan we the US was sinking them so less raw materials getting to the factories in Japan they used most what ever got through for making weapons of war and less for timepieces so issued them out as needed. Just a guess.
Here is my WW2 Naval clock

IQnIpGi.jpg
mKK258l.jpg
It mounted on the bulkhead of a Japanese destroyer


EMkml2J.jpg
The movement it has a coating for weather protection since it was made for ship use. And also made by Seikosha like yours that later became Seiko we know today. Also saw one like yours at a US Army museum in Hawaii next to the military hotel the Hale Koa Hotel it came off one of the Japanese aircraft shot down during the Pearl Harbor attack. A cool museum if you ever visit Hawaii if your retired military like I am that military hotel nice right next to the Hilton but a better price for a ocean view. Military timepieces I just love collecting them just now every ones getting into them liked it better when they were under the radar and cheaper. And nice find congrats a nice addition to your collection.
 
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new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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I suspect that most Japanese planes were shot down over the open seas and for those that were shot down over land, the planes crashed into enemy controlled areas. As such, recovery of these timepieces would be perilous, if they survived at all.

My assumption is that either the pilots found the clock's location within the plane to be difficult to use the instrument and that they removed the clocks to wear around their necks or these timepieces were manufactured pre WWII for other aviation reasons or for outdated military aircraft and the surplus was used during WWII as shown in the pictures.

Just a guess.

Regards.
 
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sawdigger

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Jan 23, 2021
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They actually wore them around their neck because of the poor manufacture of the instrument panel on the Japanese Zero planes. They would often fall out and fall to the floor of the airplane making them useless as the pilot couldn't reach it. They therefore started wearing them around their necks to avoid this problem.
 
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