• We are aware of the performance issues with the forum. These are due to problems with Comcast's shared lines in the Columbia, PA area. On December 15, we signed a contract to bring a dedicated fiber line to the forum servers. It should take somewhere between 30 and 90 days to install. Thank you for your patience.

WUBA/Warmink clocks vs Reproductions.

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
I have a face book group. This subject comes up from time to time. My question is how do you tell a reproduction Dutch Zaandam, Zaanse/Fresian/Sallander clock from a original Warmink/Wuba clock? Did Warmink/Wuba use particle or OSB board in any of the makings of the case? Are all Warmink/Wuba clocks marked somewhere. I have 2 clocks that I know were made by Wuba or Warmink as they are marked. Then I have another one I bought in England in 99 that isnt marked. So how do I know which one is a reproduction. How do I tell? Can someone please give me specifics and references to my questions? Thanks in advance.
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,641
2,139
113
All of these are modern repos, or maybe I'm not reading you correctly?

Maybe someone will post a photo of an old one.

Willie X
 

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
All of these are modern repos, or maybe I'm not reading you correctly?

Maybe someone will post a photo of an old one.

Willie X
Actually no they arent. There is a company that bought out all of the brand new Warmink/Wuba clocks. They have them on their web page for sale. Once they are sold there is no more. If you look on their web page there are several that are sold out. The Wuba/Warmink company is the most sought after Dutch clocks. However there are several reproductions out there and I am wanting an expert to tell me how to spot the differences. I hope this clears things up. Here is the company that I am speaking of. Dutch Clocks Original (dutch-clocks.com)
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,641
2,139
113
I think you have some bad information there.

Experts are usually stepping up to the plate about now ...

Willie X
 

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
Th
I think you have some bad information there.

Experts are usually stepping up to the plate about now ...

Willie X
[/QUOTE This is directly from the website that I mention above " The Warmink clock was produced by a company founded in 1929, in Almelo, a small town in the Netherlands. The Warmink clock is also known as the WUBA clock, this because the company originally was called Warmink Uurwerken en Barometers Almelo (WUBA). Later on, they switched to the company name Warmink. This company dominated the Dutch clock industry because the Warmink clock made quality clocks. And one can say that during the 60s and 70s almost every Dutch household owned a Warmink clock. Also, Warmink clocks company produced many different types of clocks. The famous Zaanse clock. Or the Sallander clock. And not to forget the impressive Friesian clock. Unlike a German clock, a Warmink clock has more decorations and their own unique design. Although the Warmink clock is not made today anymore, because of their quality and timeless design, a Warmink clock is still popular today and a real collector's items. So please take a look at and maybe you will find your Warmink clock. "
 

Burkhard Rasch

NAWCC Member
Jun 1, 2007
5,036
268
83
65
Twistringen
Country
Region
[/QUOTE This is directly from the website that I mention above " The Warmink clock was produced by a company founded in 1929, in Almelo, a small town in the Netherlands. The Warmink clock is also known as the WUBA clock, this because the company originally was called Warmink Uurwerken en Barometers Almelo (WUBA). Later on, they switched to the company name Warmink. This company dominated the Dutch clock industry because the Warmink clock made quality clocks. And one can say that during the 60s and 70s almost every Dutch household owned a Warmink clock. Also, Warmink clocks company produced many different types of clocks. The famous Zaanse clock. Or the Sallander clock. And not to forget the impressive Friesian clock. Unlike a German clock, a Warmink clock has more decorations and their own unique design. Although the Warmink clock is not made today anymore, because of their quality and timeless design, a Warmink clock is still popular today and a real collector's items. So please take a look at and maybe you will find your Warmink clock. "

by that it is clear that Warmink / WUBA was a maker of reproduction clocks itself (infact they made the cases , dials etc) , most of them equipped with German movements by Hermle , Urgos and verry few with the famous Schatz W3 . Their clocks have a certain quality and are collector´s items itself but not to confuse with the real originals from the 18th and 19th century or with true reproductions with classical reproduction movements.
Burkhard
 
  • Like
Reactions: munnerlyn3

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
[/QUOTE This is directly from the website that I mention above " The Warmink clock was produced by a company founded in 1929, in Almelo, a small town in the Netherlands. The Warmink clock is also known as the WUBA clock, this because the company originally was called Warmink Uurwerken en Barometers Almelo (WUBA). Later on, they switched to the company name Warmink. This company dominated the Dutch clock industry because the Warmink clock made quality clocks. And one can say that during the 60s and 70s almost every Dutch household owned a Warmink clock. Also, Warmink clocks company produced many different types of clocks. The famous Zaanse clock. Or the Sallander clock. And not to forget the impressive Friesian clock. Unlike a German clock, a Warmink clock has more decorations and their own unique design. Although the Warmink clock is not made today anymore, because of their quality and timeless design, a Warmink clock is still popular today and a real collector's items. So please take a look at and maybe you will find your Warmink clock. "

by that it is clear that Warmink / WUBA was a maker of reproduction clocks itself (infact they made the cases , dials etc) , most of them equipped with German movements by Hermle , Urgos and verry few with the famous Schatz W3 . Their clocks have a certain quality and are collector´s items itself but not to confuse with the real originals from the 18th and 19th century or with true reproductions with classical reproduction movements.
Burkhard
I agree that they are reproduction clocks from 100s of years prior but the argument still is how do you tell a Warmink/WUBA clock which are sought after more than other makers? Like I mention from the beginning I have 2 clocks that say WUBA or Warmink on them. The other clock doesnt and its dial is smooth compared to the Warmink/Wuba. Inside the clock there is cheaper wood and the outside of the clock uses a lamination process to make it look like real wood where the two Warmink/Wuba clocks I have dont have cheaper wood in them. The argument is that even WUBA/Warmink used that process to make some of their clocks. So not counting the Zaanse or Sallander clocks that were produced in the 18th/19th century how do you tell whether it is a WUBA/Warmink clock which is more colllectable clocks that the other makers?
 

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
[/QUOTE This is directly from the website that I mention above " The Warmink clock was produced by a company founded in 1929, in Almelo, a small town in the Netherlands. The Warmink clock is also known as the WUBA clock, this because the company originally was called Warmink Uurwerken en Barometers Almelo (WUBA). Later on, they switched to the company name Warmink. This company dominated the Dutch clock industry because the Warmink clock made quality clocks. And one can say that during the 60s and 70s almost every Dutch household owned a Warmink clock. Also, Warmink clocks company produced many different types of clocks. The famous Zaanse clock. Or the Sallander clock. And not to forget the impressive Friesian clock. Unlike a German clock, a Warmink clock has more decorations and their own unique design. Although the Warmink clock is not made today anymore, because of their quality and timeless design, a Warmink clock is still popular today and a real collector's items. So please take a look at and maybe you will find your Warmink clock. "

by that it is clear that Warmink / WUBA was a maker of reproduction clocks itself (infact they made the cases , dials etc) , most of them equipped with German movements by Hermle , Urgos and verry few with the famous Schatz W3 . Their clocks have a certain quality and are collector´s items itself but not to confuse with the real originals from the 18th and 19th century or with true reproductions with classical reproduction movements.
Burkhard
Forgot to mention one Wuba Dutch clock that I have has a one chain on it with one heavy weight and one weight that is used as a counter weight. Where most of these types of Zaanse clocks have two chains and two weights this clock has one continuous chain. I have an antique English grandfather clock designed the same way. The movement looks like a Regula cuckoo clock movement. I have contacted the web page mentioned above to ask them about it several months ago with no response. This is the only WUBA clock that I have seen like it. The clock has two pulleys. One for the big weight which is for the time and strike and the other for the counter weight which only function is to keep the chain hanging down and out of the way. Here is my you tube video explain it. Repairing a WUBA Dutch clock 20210325 002217 - YouTube
 

zedric

NAWCC Member
Aug 8, 2012
1,841
354
83
Country
Region
You seem to be under the impression that Wuba/Warmink clocks are more collectible than other makes, and clearly that is true for you. But I don’t think it is true for many other people. Can I ask where you got this impression from? Maybe in Holland there are collectors of these, since the earlier ones are nearly antiques now, but I’ve not heard of anyone else collecting them?
 

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
You seem to be under the impression that Wuba/Warmink clocks are more collectible than other makes, and clearly that is true for you. But I don’t think it is true for many other people. Can I ask where you got this impression from? Maybe in Holland there are collectors of these, since the earlier ones are nearly antiques now, but I’ve not heard of anyone else collecting them?
I have a clock group that I am the administrator of and are members of other clock groups on Face Book. Within those groups people show off their WUBA/Warmink clocks. Which are nicer than the other reproduced Zaanse/Sallender clocks. There have been questions on how do you tell that company apart which is sought after more than other company reproduced clocks. I am just trying to find out clarification. Yes youare correct. Who wouldnt want the Zaanse/Sallender clocks from the 18th/19th centuries? But since not everyone can afford one when and if they come up for sale they chose Warmink/WUBA clocks over the other makers. So if you know the difference then please explain them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: zedric

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
You seem to be under the impression that Wuba/Warmink clocks are more collectible than other makes, and clearly that is true for you. But I don’t think it is true for many other people. Can I ask where you got this impression from? Maybe in Holland there are collectors of these, since the earlier ones are nearly antiques now, but I’ve not heard of anyone else collecting them?
BTW your statement that "maybe in Holland they are" isnt exactly true. I have a group member that lives in Holland. He has for the past 15 plus years. He buys them up for cheap. Fixes them and then takes them to Polland to sell. He states "Wuba/Warmink clocks are more desirable". However there has been some arguments within the groups of folks whom think that they have a WUBA/Warmink clock that doesnt say WUBA/Warmink on them. I am trying to find as much information out on them as I can to clear the air. So to speak. Again I have two WUBA clocks. They are posted in the video link that I provided above. They are clearly nice clocks. Another group member went and picked up a WUBA grandmother clock. I have been collecting clocks since 1999. In that time frame I have only seen just a handful of WUBA grandmother/grandfather clocks. They are out there. They dont come up for sale that often. They arent made any more as the link I provided above says. So yes WUBA clocks are very collectable. Maybe not to you.
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,641
2,139
113
I've worked on 100s of these, all repos but some are nicer than others, no doubt about that. Nearly all need extensive repair or new movements.

Back on the Regula? The big weight would actually drive both trains. The small weight is to keep a tension on the loose part of the chain.

Willie X
 
  • Like
Reactions: munnerlyn3

zedric

NAWCC Member
Aug 8, 2012
1,841
354
83
Country
Region
“So yes WUBA clocks are very collectable.” Great to hear! Hopefully these and other replicas made in the 20th century will have as long a life as the clocks they are “in the style of”.
 

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
I've worked on 100s of these, all repos but some are nicer than others, no doubt about that. Nearly all need extensive repair or new movements.

Back on the Regula? The big weight would actually drive both trains. The small weight is to keep a tension on the loose part of the chain.

Willie X
I believe I mention that above. I say that I have an English grandfather clock that has a one weight system that does the same thing. But thanks for the reply.
 

new2clocks

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2005
3,832
649
113
Pennsylvania
Country
Region
I am a bit confused by your statement:

There is a company that bought out all of the brand new Warmink/Wuba clocks. They have them on their web page for sale. Once they are sold there is no more.
Since Warmink / WUBA went out of business in 1992 (see link, below), this company that you refer to, above, has been holding never-before- sold WUBA clock inventory for 30 years?

(1) Help to identify a Belgium longcase clock | NAWCC Forums

Regards.
 

munnerlyn3

Registered User
Dec 6, 2019
34
2
8
56
Country
I am a bit confused by your statement:



Since Warmink / WUBA went out of business in 1992 (see link, below), this company that you refer to, above, has been holding never-before- sold WUBA clock inventory for 30 years?

(1) Help to identify a Belgium longcase clock | NAWCC Forums

Regards.
What I am saying is that there is a web site that sells brand new WUBA/Warmink clocks. Once they are sold there isnt any more to be sold from them. Look at the site yourself and determine for yourself. Warmink Clock | Dutch CLocks (dutch-clocks.com)
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,641
2,139
113
New2 doesn't think any clocks were held back for 30 years. I don't either. Like who would ever do that. :rolleyes: Willie X
 

new2clocks

NAWCC Member
Apr 25, 2005
3,832
649
113
Pennsylvania
Country
Region
What I am saying is that there is a web site that sells brand new WUBA/Warmink clocks. Once they are sold there isnt any more to be sold from them. Look at the site yourself and determine for yourself. Warmink Clock | Dutch CLocks (dutch-clocks.com)
As I stated above, Warmink went out of business in 1992.

I looked at the description of the three Warmink clocks that are for sale.

One clock was "Made in the 1960s".

The other two clocks do not have a circa date for their manufacturing, but the description for each state:

This top piece is in great condition (but has normal traces of age) and original.

It has some normal user marks.


The description implies that the clocks are not new.

If you are of the opinion that the clocks for sale are new, then according to the website:

The company which was located in Almelo, the Netherlands was founded in 1929 and produced quality clocks. However, after 75 years in business and craftsmanship dating back to the 17th century the Warmink family closed the doors of their company forever. So the clocks that exist today will never be manufactured again.

So, the website is stating that the company went out of business in 2004 (founding year of 1929 + 75 years of business = the year 2004). If the website is correct with their dating, and if the clocks for sale were made by the original Warmink company, then the clocks for sale have been unsold for at least 17 years.

Or, the alternative is the clocks for sale are new, which implies that the clocks were not made by the original Warmink company, but by some other manufacturer who produced these clocks in the style of Warmink.

Perhaps I am missing something, but the numbers do not add up.:)

Regards.
 
Last edited:

Jeremy Woodoff

NAWCC Member
Jun 30, 2002
4,205
106
63
Brooklyn
Country
Region
What I am saying is that there is a web site that sells brand new WUBA/Warmink clocks. Once they are sold there isnt any more to be sold from them. Look at the site yourself and determine for yourself. Warmink Clock | Dutch CLocks (dutch-clocks.com)
The site includes the word "vintage" for all the clocks. I suppose some of them could be new old stock, never having been sold, or sold and then never removed from the box.

I don't know whether Warmink ever made clocks in the old posted-frame movement pattern, but these were made into the 20th century just like the now-antique 18th and 19th century clocks were made.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
171,040
Messages
1,493,338
Members
50,086
Latest member
Johnfn70
Encyclopedia Pages
1,060
Total wiki contributions
2,967
Last edit
E. Howard & Co. by Clint Geller