Wow a Vienna Regulator!

dairborn

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Nov 3, 2012
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Started the morning out going to get 2 clocks and wound up with 3. No markings on the smaller two...so if there is anyone that wants to share knowledge, please do! BB7D9742-3480-4713-B858-5BA84A00CA3B.jpeg 9DB00DA2-4A91-44C7-9146-E44FCD9DBB5F.jpeg 81D7C12B-C2C8-41B9-94FB-41D1252D7602.jpeg
 

jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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Hopefully you got a 3 for 2 deal. Quite a mixture, thoughts are; the first looks like a late 19th C German spring driven Vienna wall clock, the second looks 1930s or so likely also German and the last American around late 19th C. Pictures of the movements may help identify a maker.
 

Alex K

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Jun 20, 2020
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Middle one is a Mauthe.
First one I have seen kienzle in similar case, but better to look at movement.
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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Alex, this is the movement from that clock...I got it working yesterday. one of the springs came off the click on the time side and it wouldn't wind. Simple fix...now the challenge is going to be fixing this chime block, 3 of the 5 rods are broken!
It might be better just to buy a new chime block complete with rods. Otherwise you are going to have to get three replacement rods in tune, which is not as easy as it sounds.

Others may have other or better ideas.

JTD
 

Alex K

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Jun 20, 2020
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New chime is an always option.
But rods can be repaired, they are easily soldered. And probably and hopefully if soldered carefully tunes will not flow away far. This is a challenge, You right.
 

tracerjack

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Jun 6, 2016
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New set of chime rods is the easiest. Best to keep the original block which is the right height for the hammers, unless it has some odd thread size for which you can’t find matching rods. Or else you can possibly tap it to the new size. Rods can be repaired, but will end up shorter than original from the process, so you would have to tune the unbroken rods to the repaired ones. Not easy, but doable. If you decide to go with new rods, don’t toss the old ones. Unless the photo is misleading me, that distinctive golden color of rods are the ones whose sound I think is the best. As single rods, they still have value.
 

Alex K

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Jun 20, 2020
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I have some experience to solder two broken parts of the rod with regular solder, so it was not shorten. The small part can be screwed out rather easily.
The point of connection was firm more or less, however if it can be soldered with brass allow - it will be best I believe.
 

tracerjack

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Jun 6, 2016
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I have not been able to successfully repair a rod that has broken at the neck without shortening it Nor have I come across brass alloy solder. Perhaps you are welding or brazing, rather than soldering. I would be very interested in more details of your method of repair.
 
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