Woodworks Movement ID Help Needed

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Dave D, Nov 3, 2017.

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  1. Dave D

    Dave D Registered User
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    Apr 5, 2006
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    Can anyone tell me the maker and age of this movement? I don't have any more of the clock than this.
    Thanks in advance!
    Dave D

    IMG_4081.JPG IMG_4082.JPG IMG_4083.JPG
     
  2. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    This type of movement was typically made in the 1830s. Follow this link: http://www.nawcc-index.net/Identification.php andthen click on "Terry Type Wood Movement Identification". This leads to an Excel spreadsheet that will let you identify your movement by specific characteristics. It also includes picture examples. Sometimes these old wood movements can't be positively identified but you should be able to narrow it down to one or two possibilities.

    This thread might do better in the wooden works section.

    RC
     
  3. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2014
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    Lovely old thing, and it deserves to run. Can that crack be repaired? Maybe someone switched out that movement for an all-brass one.

    M Kinsler
     
  4. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    I have moved this to the Wood Movement forum.
     
  5. Dave D

    Dave D Registered User
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    I bought a box of movements at the flea market and this was with it.
     
  6. Dave D

    Dave D Registered User
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    Thank you. I should have done that in the first place.
     
  7. Dave D

    Dave D Registered User
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    I think what you are calling a crack is the verge wire.
     
  8. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    Or more specifically the shadow of the verge wire.

    Were there any other wooden movements in that lot?

    RC
     
  9. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2014
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    Um, yes. I guess those oak plates didn't crack, for whatever reason.

    The aluminum bell housing (the connection between engine and transmission) on my 1964 Ford Econoline van was apparently cast in a cracked mold, and the first time I took it off I was horrified at the network of cracks thereupon. Then I looked again and found that they were ridges, and that the housing was perfectly sound. Then when I replaced the clutch a year or so ago I'd forgotten about the artificial cracks in the bell housing and panicked once again.

    M Kinsler
     
  10. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    This example doesn't appear to be cracked but they sometimes do. Had one a while back that was split into two pieces right down the middle. There are several holes in a vertical row down the middle and stuff sometimes does happen. Good thing about wooden movements is that they can be glued back together.

    RC
     
  11. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User
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    Hey Dave, I can't help you, but yesterday I drove over to Sacramento and bought a spring winder, and the guy who had that is a wooden movement enthusiast, and might be of some help. He seemed to know his stuff pretty well, and had a couple of clocks he had done that ran, and he was telling me about making molds out of clay to use as a guide in making new wheels, all about how to select the right wood and make it look aged, and even how to take old labels that were in pieces and restore those. He's a former NAWCC member and likes to talk clocks, so I'm sure he'd be willing to share the info he has.
     
  12. Russell Dickson

    Russell Dickson Registered User
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    Very nice Boardman Wells movement 1830's my best guess. The best made woodworks movement, and a big improvement and much more reliable from early "Groaner" movement. Attached is a pic of a Boardman Wells movement like yours.

    Chauncey Boardman was born in 1789. He is listed as working in Bristol in 1810 through 1850. He began making wood tall clock movements with Butler Dunbar until 1812 when he bought him out. He then made movements for other companies including Chauncey Jerome. In 1832 he formed a partnership with Joseph Wells. They operated four separate factories and produced in great quantity wood movements until 1837 and the introduction of rolled brass. In 1844 the firm split and each continued under their own name. Chauncey Boardman died in 1857.

    boardmanwellsmovement-1361289571.jpg
     
  13. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Actually, I believe the movement fits the characteristics of a type 1.411 (Seymour, Williams & Porter or Seymour, Hall & Co.) or type 1.42 [Seymour, Hill (sic) & Co.], based on the Excel version of Snowden Taylor's identification scheme. Note that the Excel version lists Seymour, Hill & Co. for the type 1.42. Roberts & Taylor (Eli Terry and the Connecticut Shelf Clock, 2nd ed.) and Spittlers & Bailey (Clockmaker & Watchmakers of America, 2nd ed.) do not mention a "Hill", so I suspect that's a typo. It is not a Boardman & Wells. Among the features that differentiate a Seymour, etc. from a Boardman & Wells: strike levers centered with respect to the access hole on the former (not on the latter) and count wheel retainer at 12 o'clock on the former and 7 o'clock on the latter. Spittlers & Bailey list dates of 1831-1835 (Farmington, CT) for Seymour, Williams & Porter and 1835-1840 (Unionville/Farmington, CT) and 1840-1843 (St. Louis, MO) for Seymour, Hall & Co.

    Mike
     

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