Wooden works weights

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Bob Reichel, Nov 23, 2009.

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  1. Bob Reichel

    Bob Reichel Registered User
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    #1 Bob Reichel, Nov 23, 2009
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
    Need to know the proper weight of weights for a DANIEL PRATT, JR, 30-hour, 33 inch tall, two door Empire case, with Boardman & Wells wood movement. The clock was purchased out of state and was shipped quite disassembled with 35 oz. weights. These weights appear far too small. Substitute weights in the range of 58 oz. are now allowing movement operation.
     
  2. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Certainly I don't know "proper" for this clock but less than 4#? Sounds like ya pretty much nailed it. We'll await PROPER tho.
     
  3. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Bob,

    Something between 2 and 3 pounds will usually work. Often the strike will require less weight than the going, to give you a (not to fast) roll. The weight requirement varies quite a bit, depending on the general condition of the movement.

    Willie X
     
  4. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

    Oct 26, 2009
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    I bought a Boardman & Wells movemnt with original weights and that for the going train weights as much as 3 lbs. 9 oz.
    Now I have to replace the missing weights for a Pillar & Scroll and I need advice:
    Should I buy the 3 lbs ones or the 4 1/4 lbs. ones from Timesavers?:confused:
    Another thing, has anybody tried animal gut for the cords? Which size (diameter) would be the most adequate?

    Thanks,

    Aitor
     
  5. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Me; I'd test and determine the reliable amount of weight with decent overswing before making any choices. Neither may work.
     
  6. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

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    Thanks Scottie:cool:
    The problem is that it will take a lot of time before I take that movement apart and replace lots of broken teeth on the strike train...
    I just wanted to buy all needed spares beforehand, but I suppose that I could wait longer...;)

    I've heard that Groaners need heavier weights, is that true? Is it the same for Jerome's thins?

    Aitor
     
  7. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Aitor, one reason I would not use either gut or metal cable on a shelf clock is it's tendancy to "birdsnest" if you remove the weight. Cord doesn't do this. Also, I don't believe either would have been used originally.
     
  8. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

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    Hi Harold,

    Yes, I understand what you mean. Currently, I've got a shortdrop movement by Riley Whiting on my desk and I can't see the moment of taking those brass cables away from their drums, because they are constantly coiling and disturbing everything (I don't want to wind tham again around the drumsto remind me of them...:rolleyes:)
    I got the idea of catgut from John Tope. Clearly, braided nylon is not the original material. What was used in nineteenth century?

    Aitor
     
  9. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    I don't know that I have ever seen what I would consider original material, but I suspect a string of some kind would have been used, and replaced when it deteriorated. You will often find a hook of some kind at the bottom of the clock, so you can use an elastic band (don't these things have lots of uses?) to keep the cord tight with the weight off. But I don't think this was original to the clock.
     
  10. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    I always get the square 4lb weights from Timesavers. These are very well made, look historically accurate, and are just the right weight.
     
  11. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

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    Sooth,
    Do you mean the square weights lited on Timesavers as 'Groaner weights'?
    I supposed all shelf woodworks' weights were 'round'...:confused:

    Aitor
     
  12. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Aitor:

    It's my understanding that ALL wooden works clocks used square "Groaner" type weights. I see a lot on eBay and other places with typical round ogee weights, but these are not necessarily correct. Wooden works clocks will run with either style weight (around 3-4lbs). I could be wrong, though.
     
  13. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

    Oct 26, 2009
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    Sooth,
    I am a newby with American woodworks, but Mi Pillar & Scroll case shows wear on bakc panel and label only consistent with the rubbing made by cylindrical weights.:)

    Aitor
     

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