Wooden Works Ogee Questions

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by popeye, Jun 26, 2009.

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  1. popeye

    popeye Registered User

    May 8, 2005
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    Picked this up for $40. Any idea on age or history or maker. The stencil glass, would that be original to this piece? How common is wooden works Ogee's? Printer of label is Tiffany. Advice appreciated, thanks.
     

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  2. harold

    harold Registered User
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  3. Andy Dervan

    Andy Dervan Registered User
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    #3 Andy Dervan, Jun 26, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2009
    Hello Popeye,

    Welcome to the world of wood movement clocks - there is a group of clock collectors called "Cog Counters" who specialize in these wood movement clocks - housed in a variety of cases.

    Wood movement og clocks were produced from about 1830 to 1845. Beginning about 1840 brass movements were more popular than wood.

    The label is an important feature. Can you provide a closeup photograph? Often the label printer's name and address is on bottom of the label and is very helpful in dating the clock. Also, clock peddlers and clock retailers often over pasted their label over the original makers label.

    I did not look closely at the movement, but it appears to be a standard Terry 5 arbor movement that went into production about 1822. It was produced by numerous makers and each clock shop had their own little twist - size of holes & positions plus other little traits. Wood movement clock collector more knowledgeable than I can usually identify from which shop the movement was produced. However these movements were swapped and traded between clock makers, case makers, and clock assemblers (bought parts and assembled clocks).

    The lower glass is NOT original to the clock. These clocks came with a variety of stenciled painting or a mirror.

    Andy Dervan
     
  4. Andy Dervan

    Andy Dervan Registered User
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    Hello Popeye,

    Checking Spittler & Bailey work - L.F. Comstock is listed as clockmaker in Plymouth , CT during 1830's into 1840's. There are some clocks with labels "Comstock & Minor". He typically labels printed by Case, Tiffany & Co.

    Andy
     
  5. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Nice clock find Popeye, and the price was very good.
    Maybe you could look around to replace the tablet, it might help it look more original.
    Also another nice thing is a label that is intact and in good shape.:)
     
  6. popeye

    popeye Registered User

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    Appreciate replies. What would be some good examples of tablets? Should I look at merritts or timesavers? Thxs.
     
  7. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    The question of originality of the brass bushings around the winding arbors complicates identifying the movement. If the bushings are original, then, going by Snowden Taylor's 1980 publication, the movement is a type 8.212, maker unknown. His revised identification table, available online in Excel spreadsheet format, has four movement types (8.223, 8.224, 8.225, and 10.215), all maker unknown, that appear to be consistent with yours. LF Comstock is not listed as a user for any of these, but that's probably not surprising, because Comstock does not appear to have been a prolific clock manufacturer.

    There's a possibility that a different classification would be made if the brass bushings around the winding arbors are not original and there were rings incised in the plate around the winding arbors (evidence of which was destroyed when the bushings were installed). If so, the movement would be consistent with type 10.217 (revised table), Edward K. Jones maker. Interestingly, LF Comstock is listed as a user of these movements. From looking at the size of the bushings, I would have thought the incised rings would be preserved. It might be worth a close look to see if there's any evidence for rings.

    Roberts and Taylor, in Eli Terry and the Connecticut Shelf Clock (2nd edition), show a date of c. 1842 for LF Comstock (and same date for Comstock & Minor). The 1842 date is consistent with the Edward Jones movement mentioned above, as he was in business from 1837-42. They also show a Bradley & Comstock in business c. 1832. Not clear whether it's the same Comstock.

    As an aside to those who study wooden works movements, I was surprised to find type 8 and type 10 movements with identical characteristics in the Excel identification table. My understanding of the classification system leads me to believe that should be impossible. Can anyone see what the problem is or where I've gone wrong?
     
  8. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Not sure why I didn't notice this before, but type 8.226, Edward K. Jones, has the same characteristics as the 10.215, also EK Jones. I believe there are double entries in the table that have somehow been given unique ID numbers. Has anyone else noticed this?
     
  9. lpbp

    lpbp Registered User
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    Nice clock, although misidentified. To be an OG, or Ogee clock, it must have the OG moulding on the front panel. Yours is properly identified as a bevel case.
     
  10. Andy Dervan

    Andy Dervan Registered User
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    Hello Popeye,

    I would contact either Tom Moberg or Lee Davis; they have many pattern examples for correct period glasses.

    Andy Dervan
     

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