Wooden Works Mirror Front clock

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Casey Jones, Feb 24, 2019.

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  1. Casey Jones

    Casey Jones Registered User

    Jul 27, 2009
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    My knowledge of wooden works clocks is extremely limited so please indulge my ignorance in asking what may be a simple question. I was given this mirror front clock about 30 years ago by a retired Jewelry store owner as a gift. I have not done anything with it and it just sits atop a bookcase. I have always wondered how much credence to put into the information posted inside over the original Celey Whiting label. I know the name Seymour is well known in the time frame of the early 19th Century but I question if the clock movement was actually made in Litchfield County, Connecticut and carried to Ohio in 1818 by Deacon John Seymour and then cased by Celey Whiting. Was it a common practice to purchase clock movements and later have them cased? Perhaps someone can identify the movement as to maker and date of manufacture. Thanks 07-22-2013_4577-Edit.jpg 07-22-2013_4576.jpg 07-22-2013_4574_PhotoNinja_1.jpg 07-22-2013_4571_PhotoNinja_1.jpg 07-22-2013_4577-Edit.jpg
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    This was not at all an uncommon practice. Some clock retailers would purchase movements and place in them in cases of their own making or in cases purchased from yet another source and then market them under their own label as if they had manufactured the clock.
     
  3. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  4. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    1818 seems a bit early to me for a clock of this type. The wooden bridge at the escape wheel is typical of Riley Whiting movements from this period. Was Celey related to Riley? I don't know.

    RC
     
  5. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    1818 is probably too early for this style of clock, but some of the Ohio Whitings did not move there until the 1830's, which might fit the style. I am interested in what the experts on the movement and case might have to say. Sometimes, these historical notices, like the one above, need to be taken with a grain or two of salt.
     
  6. Casey Jones

    Casey Jones Registered User

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    I guess it was a lot easier to carry a dozen or so movements than the same amount of large clock cases.
     
  7. Casey Jones

    Casey Jones Registered User

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    I suspect that 1818 is too early also. The Seymour name as well as Whiting, are intriguing as many of them seem to have been in the clock business. Both names are associated with this one clock, so hoping the experts will pin it down.
     
  8. Peter A. Nunes

    Peter A. Nunes Moderator
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    I suspect that, as been suggested above, this is a Selah Whiting clock, sold in Wayne Township, Ashtabula County, Ohio. Selah was the Brother of William Whiting of Buffalo, NY, who in turn was a cousin of Riley Whiting, as well as a distributor of his clocks to the west. This is likely a Riley Whiting clock in its entirety, though I can't be sure. The label error, if that's what it is, is interesting in itself. I'll follow up on this with an Ohio friend who is well versed in Ohio shelf and tall case clocks.
     
  9. Peter A. Nunes

    Peter A. Nunes Moderator
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    From Chris Klingemier in Ohio:

    I will search my files (piles) for the labels from the other known Selah Whitings. I believe that the others only reference Wayne, Ohio without references to Ashtabula.

    The poplar backboard certainly speaks to an origin beyond New England, though we do not know what may have been manufactured in Buffalo. The dial colors are much too bright to me, and look much more like Ohio than New England. I suspect that only the movement was brought west.
     
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  10. Chris Klingemier

    Chris Klingemier Registered User
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    Both Selah Whiting and his son Selah Jr were active in the wooden works industry. Might Celey have been a nickname that was used to differentiate between father and son?
     

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