Wooden Works Grandfather Movement Identification

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by ShawnHVoils, Aug 1, 2015.

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  1. ShawnHVoils

    ShawnHVoils Registered User

    Jun 15, 2005
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    Hey Guys, I went to a yard sale this morning and picked up an old wooden works movement. With the wood seat plate and its bigger size I am near certain that it is for a tall case clock. The wood seat plate has a makers mark "AD" on it. One of the gears sits loosely on the movement and will fall off if tipped backwards. I have this pictured, so I guess it needs some kind of pin to hold it on. I was wondering if the movement was complete by your eyes? Would a bell have been mounted on top of the movement? Does anyone know who "AD" is? Ephraim Downs is the only old clockmaker I can think of with a D for a last name. Did he have a Father or relative with a first name beginning with an A? Thanks very much for any info you might have, Shawn
     

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  2. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    Shawn, I can't believe that no one here recognizes this movement or has any information about it, although I have personally not seen one like it. The second picture seems to show the bell hammer on the right side so I would say the bell has to be located such that the hammer would strike it. There is a flat-head wood screw through the upper pillar. I don't believe such a screw would be from this period but may have been added later for some reason. Perhaps someone was attempting to fit this movement to a different clock and supported the bell from that screw? The hour wheel and pipe that falls off would not fall off when the minute hand was in place but can't tell from the pictures how the minute hand was secured but I'm sure someone here with more experience with this style would know for sure.

    RC
     
  3. tom427cid

    tom427cid Registered User
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    Mar 23, 2009
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    #3 tom427cid, Aug 12, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2015
    Hi Shawn,
    Your movement is probably a Thomas and Hoadly or one of the individuals. If you note the pins to the left of the hour wheel these are the remains of a calendar mechanism.These movement are not very common. The vacant hole below the center arbor is for the arbor to support the date pointer. The pin on the hour wheel is part of the system also.
    Hope this helps.
    tom
     
  4. ShawnHVoils

    ShawnHVoils Registered User

    Jun 15, 2005
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    Tom, I had no idea this would have had a calendar mechanism. That's actually pretty cool for a wood movement. Thanks very much to RC and Tom for the info. I have no use for this movement whatsoever, but how could anyone not buy it when it's at a yard sale? Thanks again, Shawn
     
  5. Peter A. Nunes

    Peter A. Nunes Moderator
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    Mar 3, 2006
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    Tom is correct about the calendar remains- the missing parts are (or were) available from Don Bruno.

    My best guess is that this is a Seth Thomas movement. I've had several over the years- the movement post turnings are the same. Tom mentioned Thomas & Hoadley, which is a possibility, although most of their movements had "cheesehead" post turnings. Note that all three upper movement posts are extended to be inserted into the upper dial stiffener- this was a Porter Contract, Thomas & Hoadley, and Seth Thomas trait. I have two very early Silas Hoadley movements that share this feature- early in his production he began stubbing off the center post. It's possible that this is also an early Hoadley, but more likely Seth Thomas. This movement can be dated fairly closely- if T & H, about 1809-13, early Thomas or Hoadley, 1813-15. By 1816 Seth Thomas was off to the races with Eli Terry designed shelf clocks. This is a wonderful movement, well worth restoring. A dial may show up at auction or on eBay.
     
  6. ShawnHVoils

    ShawnHVoils Registered User

    Jun 15, 2005
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    Peter, Thanks for all the additional information. It's too bad about the calendar section being missing, but hopefully someone will be able to restore it. Thanks again, Shawn
     

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