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Wooden movement identification and repair

Ken L.

Newbie
Dec 25, 2015
33
7
8
69
Milwaukie, Oregon
Country
Region
Is there any kind of book or reference where one can look to try to identify the makers of different wooden movements? I have only been working on clocks as a hobby for a couple of years and I am learning every day just how little i know!
Before I work on one of the two "good" wooden movement clocks I have, I was given this project movement to use as a learning tool. One gear in the strike train is missing several teeth, and both the hour hand tube and the minute hand shaft are broken. I have Tom Temple's "Extreme Restoration " book and "The Repair of American Wood Geared Clock Movements " by Barlow; are there any other good repair references?
In a brief perusal of the wooden works forum I have seen the name Don Bruno several times; is he an expert on this subject?
I am attaching a photo of my project movement in case somebody can tell me more about it!
Thanks
Ken 20190110_180003.jpg
 

Jim_Miller

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Mar 6, 2001
888
14
18
72
Jackson, Michigan
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There is an article in one of the past bulletins, if you do a search out wood works identification you should find it. The article contains a spreadsheet containing different characteristics to help.
Good luck,
Jim
 

Ken L.

Newbie
Dec 25, 2015
33
7
8
69
Milwaukie, Oregon
Country
Region
Jim, I did a search and was unable to locate the article you referenced. I did note one article that mentions the "Snowden Taylor" identification system, but no information was given on where to find that system of identification. Any further help will be appreciated!
Thanks
 

Jim_Miller

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Mar 6, 2001
888
14
18
72
Jackson, Michigan
Country
Region
Jim, I did a search and was unable to locate the article you referenced. I did note one article that mentions the "Snowden Taylor" identification system, but no information was given on where to find that system of identification. Any further help will be appreciated!
Thanks
Ken, you got further with the search than I did.
Jim
 

Ken L.

Newbie
Dec 25, 2015
33
7
8
69
Milwaukie, Oregon
Country
Region
Thank you! Lots of data to go through. I realize a lot of the entries don't have photos but a cursory scan of the pictures doesn't seem to show a movement like I have. Unless someone out there can identify it, it will probably remain a mystery to me. I do hope I can get it to run, though.
I would be interested in hearing opinions on the relative merits or disadvantages to replacing wooden teeth either by dovetailing in a new wooden section, or by creating an epoxy mold. Curious what those of you who collect wooden works clocks think of the two methods.
Thanks again for helping me learn!
 

Jerome collector

Registered User
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Sep 4, 2005
872
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28
Omaha, NE
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Thank you! Lots of data to go through. I realize a lot of the entries don't have photos but a cursory scan of the pictures doesn't seem to show a movement like I have. Unless someone out there can identify it, it will probably remain a mystery to me. I do hope I can get it to run, though.
I would be interested in hearing opinions on the relative merits or disadvantages to replacing wooden teeth either by dovetailing in a new wooden section, or by creating an epoxy mold. Curious what those of you who collect wooden works clocks think of the two methods.
Thanks again for helping me learn!
Setting aside the presence of brass bushings for the winding arbors for the moment, the shop details are consistent with a type 9.223 (Boardman or Boardman & Wells), 9.224 (unknown manufacturer), and 9.225 (unknown). The brass bushings appear to be original, and Snowden doesn't note whether any of these movements have been found with bushings. Perhaps not a definitive answer, but my money is on Chauncey Boardman or Boardman & Wells as the maker. Others who have seen more Boardman movements may be able to comment on whether his firms were ever known to use bushings for the winding arbors.
Mike
 

Ken L.

Newbie
Dec 25, 2015
33
7
8
69
Milwaukie, Oregon
Country
Region
Setting aside the presence of brass bushings for the winding arbors for the moment, the shop details are consistent with a type 9.223 (Boardman or Boardman & Wells), 9.224 (unknown manufacturer), and 9.225 (unknown). The brass bushings appear to be original, and Snowden doesn't note whether any of these movements have been found with bushings. Perhaps not a definitive answer, but my money is on Chauncey Boardman or Boardman & Wells as the maker. Others who have seen more Boardman movements may be able to comment on whether his firms were ever known to use bushings for the winding arbors.
Mike
Thanks! I am learning, I guess. Now I need to figure out how to make the missing verge, and how many teeth it should span on a 32 tooth escape wheel.