Wooden movement & Clock ID

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by durant7, Apr 16, 2013.

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  1. durant7

    durant7 Registered User

    Mar 24, 2012
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    I am a novice but trying to learn. The subject clock is repaired and running by a NAWCC member but I did not collect any info nor did he offer it. I thought it would be nice to pass on to the next generation a bit more history about the clock. This is not a value question, I just would like to have a family story to pass on for all those clocks that have survived over the past few generations.

    Sadly the inside paper typically pasted on the back is gone. From my reading here on the forum, it seems like the experts can look at a movement and make a suggestion. It is a 30 hour clock. If other details are needed just ask. This is one of three wooden movement clocks which were passed down. I am starting with the "largest" and with the least info.

    On the back of the solid wood, original painted face it has the following.

    JT 1855 N 5/ (pencil, large, center top of panel)

    My uneducated and unfounded guess this was the maker. The following I think are subsequent clock makers that may have worked on the clock.

    Mar 26th 1861 (scribed)
    J. Sorlhnadge Stamford May 24th 1864 (pencil top)
    M. 7th 1866 (scribed)

    If there is other info needed, just ask. If this is a futile and silly initiative on my part, I am all ears.

    Thanks in advance,

    JD in NH
     

    Attached Files:

  2. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Nov 26, 2009
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    Nice clock.

    I had a clock by Willams, Orten's and Preston with that case style, but their movements are brass bushed and so touted on the label.

    There are charts and tables which categorize movements based upon a number of basic characteristics and often will then assign a movement to a particular maker and which makers in turn placed them in their products. One maker may have made movements for clocks made by another maker. See the clocknuts.com web site for a table that is widely used by clock collectors. Why not have a go at it yourself? I would link you to it but ongoing technical issues with the MB won't permit.

    I'm notoriously bad at that and often get it wrong, so I will leave it to other MB participants.

    The various notations you see are not by the maker. They were placed there by the long line of people who serviced the clock over the years. A nice bit of the history of an old clock.

    Enjoy your genuinely antique American clock.

    RM
     
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  3. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2005
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    Geologist, US Army Corps of Engineers
    Omaha, NE
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    JD,
    Using the on-line Excel version of Snowden Taylor's identification scheme (http://clocknuts.com/Wood%20Movement%20ID.htm), I believe your movement is either a type 8.136 (E. & G.W. Bartholomew, G.W. Bartholomew, or Eli Bartholomew & Co.) or 8.137 (Elisha Hotchkiss or Hotchkiss & Fields). Unfortunately, these firms supplied movements to a host of makers, too numerous to list. The Bartholomew firms were in business from 1829-1835; Hotchkiss firms from 1830-1845 (Roberts & Taylor, Eli Terry and the Connecticut Shelf Clock, 2nd ed.).
    Mike
     
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  4. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2005
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    Geologist, US Army Corps of Engineers
    Omaha, NE
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    JD,

    To convince yourself that the movement is original to the case, check for extra holes in the vertical rails where the nails go through to secure the movement. If there's just one set of holes, then it's likely the movement is original. If more than one set of holes, that's not a good sign.

    And for what it's worth, from my perspective your search for info is not a "futile and silly initiative." This is half the fun of owning antique clocks.

    Mike
     
  5. durant7

    durant7 Registered User

    Mar 24, 2012
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    Thank you for the suggestions. I am getting up to speed on the worksheet but have some clock terminology to sort through. All part of the process. I have maybe half of them answered that are easy for me to determine. 8.136 is still in the running but even when all filters are off, 8.137 is not listed. Perhaps you have a more current version.

    Hour barrel (not square)
    Count wheel retainer (4:30)
    Verge pin button (round)
    Access holes (large)
    No figure 8 hole for count hook (none)
    Escapement wheel bridge square (rec)

    I am going to have to think (teach myself) about the remaining 4 questions.

    As for "is the movement original to the case". There are no other holes in the vertical rails. And, the rear plate of the movement is cut into the back of the case. Sadly, there is no steel plate covering the back of the movement as I have seen on some old clocks.

    As to my "silly question"....it was more a way to apologize for my less than expert clock knowledge. I enjoy clocks, I enjoy learning how to fix them. I enjoy the provenance hunt. But, at times, I feel uncomfortable asking questions in a community filled with highly knowledgeable folks. I'm 50 and starting an interest far too late in life. For now, my focus is on cataloging all family clocks. This is #1 of 3 wooden movements. 2 of 3 run. Maybe the 3rd will one day.

    Thanks!
     
  6. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2005
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    Geologist, US Army Corps of Engineers
    Omaha, NE
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    JD,
    No need to apologize. You're asking questions, and that's important. And 50 is by no means too late to be starting to show interest in antique clocks. Cataloging your clocks is a wonderful way to get your feet wet, and it serves a useful purpose.

    As far as the spreadsheet goes, I re-downloaded the version on clocknut's website, and it hasn't changed. Why you're not seeing an 8.137 stumps me. Try filtering for the makers, Elisha Hotchkiss and Hotchkiss & Fields. Maybe that will turn up 8.137.

    When I get a little more time, I'll try to doctor one of my movement photos to point out the features that you haven't been able to figure out.

    Mike
     
  7. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2005
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    Geologist, US Army Corps of Engineers
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    Refer to the numbers on the attached image.

    1a - strike wire arbors are shown; not centered with respect to the large access hole to the right.
    1b - pivot material: the upper pivot is wood, the lower is steel.
    1c - there are rings around the two strike wire cups
    2 - rings around the winding arbors.

    Hope this helps.

    Mike
    DSC_0251_edited.jpg
     
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  8. durant7

    durant7 Registered User

    Mar 24, 2012
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    An excellent education. I will read the desription again and look at the clock and figure out what my gaps were in terminology. Thank you. I opened the worksheet anew and I did find 8.137. I do know excel much better than I understand clocks. Solar flare!

    JD in NH
     

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