wooden clock movements

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Carl Spencer, Jun 23, 2017.

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  1. Carl Spencer

    Carl Spencer Registered User
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    Apr 7, 2015
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    Hello: Could someone tell me what the winding arbor gears diameters are. The plates are 6 1/2" x 8 1/8" and that is about all I can tell you. Can't make pictures but the movement seams common on the internet. One gear measures 2.871" and another one 2.771. Have 2 complete movements in 2 containers but the winding gears do not match. Thanks for any help! Carl in NC.
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Jan 15, 2004
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    I have moved this to the Wood Movement Clocks forum. Can you, in any way, post pictures of what movements you have? We would do better with pictures.
     
  3. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    Carl, there are a couple of hundred of different versions of wood works movements. Some have parts in common, some are unique. Common on the internet doesn't tell us anything that will allow any useful assistance. The plate demensions you mention are fairly common to a lot of different clock makers.... production WW movements were made for 30 years +/- and there were many makers.....
     
  4. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User
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    Apr 4, 2006
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    So what's the issue? If both movements are complete there should be no problem. As stated, there are differences in parts between different makers, plus the strike side and time side gears (wheels) are frequently different in the same clock. Damaged wheels can usually be repaired.

    RC
     
  5. Carl Spencer

    Carl Spencer Registered User
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    Apr 7, 2015
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    This reply is actually for R.C. Hello RC. Working on WW movement and would like to know how critical the line has to be from the straight part of the tooth to the center of the gear. Some drawings show the line going from the side of the arbor hole to the outside of the gear. One drawing you show has the line coming from the center to the outside of the gear and the flat of the tooth being on this line. Moving the line to either side of the arbor bore changes the position of the tooth angle. Please forgive me for not knowing the correct terminology.
     
  6. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User
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    Apr 4, 2006
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    If I understand correctly you are asking about the "slanted" shape of typical wooden wheels. I don't have figures and believe they may vary a little from maker to maker and wheel to wheel in the same movement. If we considered a typical main wheel the center hole will be about 3/8". One face of tooth will be on a tangent to about the outer edge of the center hole. The other face will be on a tangent to a larger circle concentric to the center hole, that circle perhaps an inch or so diameter.

    If if you are replacing a tooth you can lay a straight edge next to each face of a good tooth and extrapolate the diameter of the circle it is tangent to and make the replacement tooth's face tangent to the same circle.

    There is an article in an old issue of the journal describing building a Terry wooden movement that includes diameters of wheels and the tangent circles. I believe the article also ran in Popular Mechanics. Most things about these old clocks is not extremely critical but one should try to come close to the original.

    RC
     
  7. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User
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    The article titled "Early American Clock Has Wooden Works" describes in great detail how to construct a pillar and scroll clock including the exact replica of the Terry type wooden movement. The article gives dimensions, pictures and drawings for every part to the last detail and it includes a chart of the wheel dimensions and the concentric circles to which the teeth faces are tangent. The article begins on pg. 154 of the December 1959 issue of Popular Mechanics and continues on page 216 of the January 1960 issue. The second part has the gear details. Both issues are available free on Google Books. You should find it if you just "Google" Popular Mechanics December 1959 or January 1960.

    This link should go to part two that has the gear detail:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=59sDAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Popular+Mechanics+January+1960&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiZ9OqZnZjVAhWCNz4KHWgyA3kQ6AEIJjAA#vnepage&q=Popular%20Mechanics%20January%201960&f=false

    The same article is in the Journal archive but the copy quality is not so good as the PM copy on Google.

    RC
     
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