Wood works and pivot wire: how to replace?

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by jboger, Oct 7, 2019.

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  1. jboger

    jboger Registered User

    Jan 7, 2019
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    I have a wood works movement, that will run, but rather weakly. The second wheel pivot on the pinion side is severely worn. In fact I've never seen a pivot so worn. It needs to be replaced before any other repair is made.

    Is it possible to pull the worn pivot out of the wooden arbor and drive a new one in? I have pivot wire, and if need be I can turn it down to the right diameter and polish it. This seems to me the only path forward, that is, pull the old wire out and drive a new one home, but it would be very reassuring if someone with more experience than I could comment.

    I've been asking a lot of questions. People have been very helpful. This Forum has one very appreciative member. I bushed another clock today. I have had a Terry Jr pillar & scroll for years. Today I decided to look at it again. I noticed right away that there was an enormous amount of side shake to the upper pivot of the escape wheel. I bushed it. To my amazement, after all these years, the clock is running now. I have not run it for the full drop of the weight yet, so other problems may reveal themselves, but at least one problem is fixed. So again a very appreciative member here.
     
  2. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    One of the repairs done for many years is pull the pivot out of the arbor, reverse it, and push it back in the original hole in the arbor. Sometimes it will be necessary to straighten the pivot after doing this as the holes are not always straight in the arbors to begin with. And you may discover it has already been reversed before. But it is nothing but soft wire so it can be replaced with a wire nail of the right diameter with the head trimmed off and shortened, or in some case a length of (shudder) small diameter coat hanger. cleaned of paint and polished.
     
  3. jboger

    jboger Registered User

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    Thought people might like to see a worn pivot. The pivot is harder than the wood, but I guess the part that turns is the part that wears.

    IMG_0529.jpg IMG_0525.jpg
     
    Peter A. Nunes likes this.
  4. jboger

    jboger Registered User

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    Here are some pictures. After taking them, I noticed that the cord was not over the pulley; it ran anyway. That's been corrected. Only the minimal wheels for the time side are assembled, this just to see if the clock runs. It's been running for several hours. So what have I done? I inverted the second wheel pivot and bushed the back side of the escape wheel. It runs better since I inverted the pivot. Someone penciled in a repair in 1952 on the back of the dial. And there is a date for 1906 as well. I hve what appear to be the original hands. Curious to think that someone may have used this clock as a time keeper into the 20th C.

    IMG_0530.jpg IMG_0531.jpg
     
  5. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Good work! Nice to see it is a groaner too. And a good label. Getting hard to come by these days.
     
  6. jboger

    jboger Registered User

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    Jim, thanks for the complement. And thanks for your help. The 1952 repair date states that two repairs were made: (1) the front pivot hole of the escape wheel was bushed (I can see it) and (2) a ratchet tooth was added to the winding arbor (see that too). This tooth was done very well. I'll keep a note with the clock that states what I did. I do see two other repairs: Two added teeth to the strike winding wheel (not the ratchet). And a soldering repair to the verge. In short, only two wheels have been repaired, and one of those repairs is to the ratchet. All in all, I think that's pretty minimal for a clock of this age.

    I need to change the cords, both of them. Some disassembly required. I'll take a photo later.
     

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