Wood refinishing

Discussion in 'Case Construction, Repair & Restoration' started by Daniel West, Sep 15, 2018.

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  1. Daniel West

    Daniel West Registered User
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    May 3, 2018
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    I am a newbie to clocks and a new NAWCC member. I recently purchased an old ST clock. The clock wood finish is in pretty good shape but is dirty and reeks of cigarette smoke. What would be the best way to clean the wood finish without hurting the value of the clock? And, how do I get rid of the smoke smell? I noticed that the works are ST number 24. Where can I get a manual to help me take it apart and get it running again. Also, it is missing a pendulum and key. How do I find parts that match? Thanks a million.
    Dan
     
  2. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    If you can post some pictures of the clock, including one of the back movement plate, I'm sure folks will be able to tell you the model and best way to proceed on both the case and movement.
     
  3. Daniel West

    Daniel West Registered User
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    May 3, 2018
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    Thanks, Martin. I will try and add a couple of photos here. I did note that the model number is 124, not 24.

    Yg61mPijQ7qOMxpjr9wobA.jpg hOdXmI31TlWUqbdXBFvIeg.jpg XO1quicBS%6dy6iKLp94Jg.jpg
     
  4. breeze

    breeze Registered User

    May 2, 2010
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    It's a Seth Thomas 124 movement and is not a good choice for your first movement to repair, just search the MB for comments on this movement. I'm sure Steve Conover covers it in one of his manuals. Again, if it's your first movement, I would think twice. After you have a good deal of experience go ahead and dive in.

    Breeze
     
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  5. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    As far as I can see from the photo, the case is in good condition, just dirty. You can buy clock case restorer from the usual suppliers such as Timesavers. This comes in small bottles and a little goes a long way. Work over small areas at a time until no more dirt comes off on the cloth (you will be surprised how much will come off!). When you have been over the whole case,you can then give the case a polish with a good wax polish, preferably one that does not contain silicones.

    I think you will be pleased with the result.

    You can also buy a pendulum bob from the same source.

    JTD
     
  6. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Nov 18, 2012
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    Agreed re. the movement. 3 train movements are not good to start with. The case looks like a needs a good cleaning. I have used Murphys Soap with very good results. It can be picked up just about anywhere. If you want to give the case a shine I would recommend Minwax wipe-on poly.

    Ron
     
  7. Daniel West

    Daniel West Registered User
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    Thanks for the tips! I really appreciate them. What would be a good movement to start with?
    Dan
     
  8. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Time only. Very simple. Not much to go wrong in servicing this type of movement.
    Ron
     
  9. brian fisher

    brian fisher Registered User
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    #9 brian fisher, Nov 1, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
    I suggest gojo hand cleaner to scrub your cabinet with. get a fairly soft brush like those used to scrub dishes in your kitchen. apply gently in small circles and wipe off with paper towels. you may need to apply 3 or 4 times or more to get it clean.

    as to the movement, it is indeed a fairly complicated 3 train with a lot of parts. I don't know anything about or have experience with this particular model. I agree it may not be a great first choice when delving into your first clock repair project, but I believe that if you take a lot of care in your work, you can likely have a successful outcome. take a LOT of pictures with your cell phone. keep the 3 trains separated at all times. I usually use a piece of polystyrene foam insulation board to lay out my gears and such. I poke the small end into the foam to keep it in its proper position once it is out of the movement plate.

    I have been here and interested in clocks for a little less than 2 years. this was my first post: Need some help with a Hans Winterhalder 3 weight cable movement

    as you can see, I didn't know jack about anything to do with clocks when I first started. with patience and some perseverance, you can fix your clock I am pretty sure. perhaps it won't be the easiest first project, but I bet "you can do eet!" (in that rob Schneider from the movie "water boy" kind of way)
     
  10. StoveBolt

    StoveBolt Registered User

    May 15, 2011
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    #10 StoveBolt, Nov 28, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2018
    I have a walnut case clock that the finish was dry a little dirty and lacked luster as yours. I looked at restorer products they sell at hardware's and antique malls and was afraid of messing with the original finish. Wound up using Johnson's paste wax, couple coats and let it dry in btwn then buffed it off, used a paint brush to get the wax in the crevices and my old shoe brush from my army days that I shined my boots with to get in the crevices to buff. Was pleasing surprised with results. Think it would take away the smell too.

    4.JPG
     

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