Woerds Patent on small Waltham Riverside movement

PJQL

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Hi all,

There are many threads referencing Woerds Patents, buy very few identifying specific ones. As far as I am aware, there is no actual list in existence of all the patent numbers registered ?

Does anyone know if one of his patents referred to the device visible on this escapement...namely what appears to be a circular counterweight on the pallet fork?

TIA, Piers
20221003_164353.jpg
20221003_164319.jpg
20221003_164319.jpg
 

Clint Geller

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Hi all,

There are many threads referencing Woerds Patents, buy very few identifying specific ones. As far as I am aware, there is no actual list in existence of all the patent numbers registered ?

Does anyone know if one of his patents referred to the device visible on this escapement...namely what appears to be a circular counterweight on the pallet fork?

TIA, Piers
View attachment 729854 View attachment 729855 View attachment 729856
Hi, I'm not sure why you're saying this movement has a "Woerd's patent." The patent pinion referred to on the plate is for a threaded pinion that unscrews, dissipating the reverse impulse that can damage the gear train when a mainspring breaks. That patent is attributed to C. W. Fogg, not to Charles vander Woerd. I see no special mechanisms associated with the escapement.
 
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PJQL

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The following site lists a number of Woerd's patents apparently associated with Waltham watches. Perhaps what you seek is among them?

Waltham Pocket Watch Patents | Pocket Watch Database
Ah
View attachment 729877

I think this is what Piers is talking about Clint. You can see Woerd´s Patent at the bottom.

Allan.
Hi, I'm not sure why you're saying this movement has a "Woerd's patent." The patent pinion referred to on the plate is for a threaded pinion that unscrews, dissipating the reverse impulse that can damage the gear train when a mainspring breaks. That patent is attributed to C. W. Fogg, not to Charles vander Woerd. I see no special mechanisms associated with the escapement.
Hi Clint.....apologies, I didn't post one of the better close ups.
Allan has spotted it. And here's the circular device I referred to in a closer shot.

Thanks, Piers
20221003_164338.jpg
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Clint Geller

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Ah



Hi Clint.....apologies, I didn't post one of the better close ups.
Allan has spotted it. And here's the circular device I referred to in a closer shot.

Thanks, Piers View attachment 729882 View attachment 729884
Hi Piers,

I don't immediately know what the circular device is in the image. However, the "Woerd's Patents" marking on the edge of the dial plate likely refers to the winding and setting arrangement.
 
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PJQL

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Hi Piers,

I don't immediately know what the circular device is in the image. However, the "Woerd's Patents" marking on the edge of the dial plate likely refers to the winding and setting arrangement.
Thanks Clint.

I've since noticed that a number of his patents refer to setting mechanisms etc...things that you can't see!

Regards,
Piers
 

Clint Geller

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Thanks Clint.

I've since noticed that a number of his patents refer to setting mechanisms etc...things that you can't see!

Regards,
Piers
Piers,

Here is a clearer picture of what you showed, from a similar watch, courtesy of my watchmaker. It is just the counterpoise on the end of the lever to make the lever's center of inertia concentric with the lever arbor. Counterpoises were not patented.

1664990636177.jpeg
 
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PJQL

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Piers,

Here is a clearer picture of what you showed, from a similar watch, courtesy of my watchmaker. It is just the counterpoise on the end of the lever to make the lever's center of inertia concentric with the lever arbor. Counterpoises were not patented.

View attachment 729992
Ok...thanks for that Clint. Just a standard manufactured part
It's great to be able to identify smaller watch parts, especially if you don't see them that often.

Piers.
 

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