Winding Guidance

Rie

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Apr 22, 2021
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As the curator of a small, rural historic site I am responsible for the contents of a building where a there is a Herschede Model 122 with dial and works built by Waltham Clock Co. in 1908. This formidable clock has not been wound for at least 5 years, and perhaps as many as 12. Having recently ordered a key crank, I am ready to wind and set the clock, something that I have looked forward to for a long time. Now that the time is here however, I am concerned about doing something that may inadvertently damage the works. A simple web search for specific guidance on winding and setting this particular clock was not helpful, so I'm hoping one of you might suggest a source of step by step instructions, or provide information that will guide me through the process. The clock was last serviced in 1998. Thank you.
 

new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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Welcome to the forum.

Your questions may be better answered in the clock repair forum.

Click on the REPORT button. This will take you to a moderator. You can ask the moderator to move your thread. Only a moderator can move a thread.

Do NOT start a different thread on the same subject, as this causes confusion.

Regards.
 

Dick Feldman

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It is unlikely you will damage the clock by winding, starting the pendulum and setting the time.
As a general rule, do not force anything. Turn the minute hand clockwise to set the clock to the proper time. Do not worry too much about the chime and strike being out of sequence with the hands as most of those large movements had an auto correct feature. Probably it will correct itself within a few hours of running--If it runs at all.
It sure would be helpful to have detailed pictures of the movement and the clock.
If the movement was last serviced in 1998, it would be good to know what was done.
Servicing is a broad statement and means different things to different people.
That could have been a squirt of oil and setting the beat or could have been a complete overhaul on the movement.
A lot of time has lapsed since the 1908 production date and lots of things could be wrong. (1908 was five years after the first airplane flew).
The clock may be a jewel in the rough or could become a large financial burden.
It sounds like the clock may be a worthwhile project.
Best of luck,
Dick
 

shutterbug

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I agree. You can't really damage anything by winding it up, and even if there were a problem with a click, you could wind it back down with the crank. At the top of this forum there's a helpful hints section that contains information on how to set the clock in beat. It's called "Beat setting 101". Read that and let us know how it all works out!
I would recommend NOT turning the hands CCW. Just turn them the way they normally turn.
 

R. Croswell

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I suggest that you only wind it perhaps 1/4 the way up. That way, if is doesn't run (very likely that it will not after sitting so long) you won't need to contend with removing the heavy weights at the top where the hooks may not be accessible. If I were the caretaker of a valuable clock like this must be, I would consider this a short test run to confirm if the clock will run but I would have the movement professionally cleaned and properly oiled to extend its life if it is to be a daily runner.

Can we please see some pictures of the clock and the movement?

RC
 

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