Winding Arbors

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Jerry Freedman, Feb 13, 2018.

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  1. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Registered User
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    Sep 16, 2000
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    I am sitting here looking at movement from a Whiting long case clock. The dial found with the clock is very
    typical of most other Whiting dials with two winding holes. However, I can't see where this movement
    ever had two winding arbors. I am not a clock guy, so what am I missing?

    Jerry Freedman
     
  2. ross_t

    ross_t Registered User

    Apr 18, 2016
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    Perhaps the face was swapped
     
  3. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

    Dec 7, 2011
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    30hour clock? Chain drive
     
  4. Kenneth Brockman

    Kenneth Brockman Registered User
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    Aug 5, 2013
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    It would be nice to see a few good pictures of this movement. My guess is that it's a pull-up type movement, but need to see pictures of front and back, with interior shots if possible. If it is this type of movement it probably is a 30 hour.
     
  5. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Registered User
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    Here are two pictures of the movement.

    DSCN2526.JPG DSCN2527.JPG
     
  6. Tom Vaughn

    Tom Vaughn Registered User

    Feb 10, 2018
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    Don't forget that sometimes the winding holes were painted on the dials. I'm not familiar with any Whiting tallcase clocks which were key wound. Dial painters would sometimes paint holes on the faces to look like expensive key wound movements. The movement pictured is a pull up movement. Do you have a picture of the face, or the front of the movement?
     
  7. David 62

    David 62 Registered User
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    It is a pull up movement and never required a key.
     
  8. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Registered User
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    Yes, it is a pull up movement. Saw the dial and the holes were painted. They even painted in the arbors. Thanks to all who replied.

    Jerry Freedman
     
  9. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Registered User
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    Does any one know who Riley Whiting used as a dial painter? Also I am interested in knowing something about the manufacturing process. Did he have apprentices ? Was there some type of assembly line or was this a cottage industry?

    Jerry Freedman
     
  10. Tom Vaughn

    Tom Vaughn Registered User

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    Riley Whiting was one of the last makers of wooden gear tall case clock movements (The last being Silas Hoadley around 1835). Whiting was in business for a long period of time. I am sure he had plenty of apprentices over the years, but I don't know of anyone in specific. Whiting as well as other tall case movement manufacturers typically hired women to do the painting for the faces. Eli Terry, who was the first to mass produce this style clock with interchangeable parts, actually had a room in his home where he boarded painters (Like Candace Roberts). I believe Candace wrote once in her diary that she would go out with a group of her friends and they would paint dials together (sort of like a quilting bee). Dials were not typically signed by the artist, so identifying any particular artists would be complicated.
    As far as assembly, after Eli Terry's Porter Contract, the assembly line became more of a standard. Gears were cut out many at a time, pinions were turned the same size in bulk depending on which part, etc. and assembled as needed in the end. Some faces have numbers on the rear, I have one that is labeled "Box 2 No. 63". This means the 63rd clock movement in the second shipment of clocks.
     
  11. Peter A. Nunes

    Peter A. Nunes Moderator
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    Jerry, there is oodles of information on the wooden movement clock making industry during the first four decades or so of nineteenth century, both in the Bulletins and the Cog Counter's Journals. Additionally, both Ken Roberts and Snowden Taylor have written extensively about the subject in a couple of books, notably Eli Terry and the Connecticut Shelf Clock, and Connecticut Clock Technology, 1810-1862, the Contributions of Joseph Ives. Further reading, with excellent biographies of makers, along with great photographs, can be found in Philip Morris's book, American Wooden Movement Tall Clocks.
     
  12. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    For the greater part apprenticeship programs for clockmakers were not very common, and by the time of Riley Whiting they were not really clock makers as musch as they were manfactuers of "things" that just happened to be a clock mechanism. I suspect the "how to make machines to do the work", how to make jigs and fixtures, and how to mass produce everything would be the focus of Whiting and his workers, not really clockmaking per se'. There were quite a number of people painting dials in the area, mostly women, and most clockmakers may have had favorite providers it appears they were not exclusive and would often buy from or sell to who ever had what they needed at a specific time. However, often agreements were in place to provide so and so 1000 dials done in xxx fashion no later than "spring next" or some similar sort of agreement. Technically women could not legally contract in those days and sometimes the husbands were signatories to the agreements, but not always. Womens sufferage arose a bit later for good cause....

    Per Ken Roberts "In 1807 the brothers Samuel and Luther Hoadley, who had come from Waterbury, joined
    with their brother-in-law Riley Whiting and began making thirty-hour tall clock wooden movements
    at Winchester under the firm name of S. Hoadley & Co. The firm was also known as Hoadleys
    & Whiting. Luther died in 1813 and in 1819 Whiting purchased all interests, and continued under
    his own name. He apparently was a prolific producer of these movements and may have been the last
    individual among these Connecticut clockmakers to make such movements, perhaos to about 1830.
    He then made shelf clocks until his death in 1835"

    So, to the earlier question I doubt that Whiting had any "apprentices" in the sense of the word....
     

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