Winding arbor hook is broke off

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by dmorrow, Feb 18, 2006.

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  1. dmorrow

    dmorrow Guest

    I have a winding arbor with the hook broke off. Appreciate any help with the remedy. Can the hook be remade on the arbor? Do I need to find a replacement arbor?
     
  2. dmorrow

    dmorrow Guest

    I have a winding arbor with the hook broke off. Appreciate any help with the remedy. Can the hook be remade on the arbor? Do I need to find a replacement arbor?
     
  3. Tony Ambruso

    Tony Ambruso Registered User

    Dec 2, 2005
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    Lots of pressure exerted on that point. I do not know if I'd trust a repair. Can you afford to accept the damage created by that spring letting go at some point? I would be inclined to obtain another winding arbor, if that is possible.
     
  4. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Aug 29, 2002
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    Hey Dave-

    Some of these hooks were nothing more than a steel rod wedged in a hole while others were a gouged out portion of the arbor. If yours is a steel rod, punch out the remnant and replace it.

    If it is the gouged out type, your arbor hook can be replaced by drilling a hole through the arbor, tapping it, then making a screw to fit. I make the screw so it has a shoulder and a large head that can be shaped to look like the original hook. The threaded body should protrude beyond the arbor enough that you can peen it over and secure the screw. File off the head of the screw so it looks like the original hook and file off the peen so it is flush with the arbor.

    If it would help, I can produce some pictures to make things a bit clearer.

    Good luck with it!
     
  5. Tony Ambruso

    Tony Ambruso Registered User

    Dec 2, 2005
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    Very nice solution. I may be becoming too time conscious. Say that three times real fast. :biggrin:
     
  6. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Aug 29, 2002
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    Dmorrow requested pictures so I thought I'd post them here.

    This is just a generic situation but should give a general idea of the process...

    53.jpg

    54.jpg

    55.jpg

    56.jpg

    57.jpg

    58.jpg
     
  7. Richard T.

    Richard T. Deceased
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    Apr 7, 2005
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    Greetings David!

    Thanks for the great graphics. I printed them for my file. It's always interesting and extremely helpful to read your postings.

    Best regards,

    Richard T.
     
  8. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Aug 29, 2002
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    Thanks Richard, I'm glad to do it. As a friend of mine says, "A picture is worth a thousand gesticulations." :)
     
  9. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    May 31, 2005
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    On this issue I would have to Agree with Tony`s first assessment. I have repaired a number of my own lesser qaulity Movement arbors as David has suggested without ever a problem. While it is true that the "Hook" is no more than a pin in a hole from the factory on some Arbors it is a very poor design in my opinion. Over the years I have had a small number of these works where the Arbors with holes in them have broken in half at the hole area creating much damage. Others where the hook had let loose were cracked on at least one side next to the hole. While I have not had more than a handful I am personally not comfortable with this repair for a customer. A new one piece Arbor can be turned in a properly equiped shop in little more time than a typical repair. Repairs take longer than you think if you keep track of time. In a case such as this the customer is advised of the additional cost for the repair and has the option to take it elsewhere.

    Jerry Kieffer
     
  10. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    I've used a nail successfully, using the same basic idea as LaBounty's but peening instead of threading. Most nails will not be flush, so there is a natural lip sticking up to catch the spring. As posted previously, there is not as much pressure on the hook as you may think.
     
  11. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Aug 29, 2002
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    Jerry raises a valid point that this method of hook replacement can be a dangerous venture on some arbors. When the arbor is a multi-piece affair, with the shaft passing through a larger cylinder, drilling a hole through the cylinder and arbor causes the arbor to become weak. In situations like this, the hole should not exceed 60% of the diameter of the arbor (which may be too small to be safe as a hook).

    Sometimes, the only option is to replace the whole arbor, hook and all, as Jerry suggests.

    Dmorrow's arbor has (had) the "gouged-out" type of hook so there shouldn't be a problem using the method of hook replacement outlined above. (He shared that information with me in a PM but it is important to include it here.)

    Thanks for pointing out the dangers Jerry!
     

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