William Addis Bracket Clock

digitalpan

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Oct 29, 2012
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Hi everyone, it seems to happen a lot to me, I deliver one clock after extensive repairs and I come away with another to be looked at!

This time it's an English bracket clock marked Wm Addis on the dial:

P1050412.jpg P1050413.JPG P1050414.JPG

It's very unlikely to be a real ADDIS - it would be very much more ornate, and the typeface on the dial is wrong. The owner was a little vague about what was wrong with the clock, but when I got it to the workshop and sorted out the tangled cables (one steel, one gut, the stop work needed adjustment) it seemed to run well.

Until it stopped overnight.

I took off the suspension hanger and removed the pallet arbor to allow the going train to run down under finger control, and with a magnifier and bright light took a close look at the gear teeth:

P1050409.jpg P1050411.jpg

These are two different areas on the fusee great wheel. I marked the teeth with a black spot, let the clock run until a bent tooth was just about to engage with the pinion, then replaced the pallet arbor and set the clock running. And just as I had hoped/feared it stopped after about half an hour with the bent tooth meshed with the pinion. You may be able to see that the teeth adjacent to the bent ones are badly worn, presumably where the pinion has been scraping against the tooth.

The purist in me says to replace all the damaged teeth; the pragmatist says carefully bend the teeth straight and try it, to make sure the gear train doesn't jump at this point.

Any views?
 

Randy Beckett

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May 23, 2012
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It looks like the tooth can probably be straightened. I would go through my screwdriver assortment until I found one with just the right pitch to insert between the teeth, with the tip against the root of the adjacent tooth, and gently nudge it back in place. Check with high magnification for cracks around the root of the tooth, and replace it if any are found.
 

Andy Dervan

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Oct 23, 2002
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Hello,

I do not know what the clock is worth or how much the customer wants to spend on repairing the clock.

If you can not straighten the teeth or damage the teeth straightening them, it might be been to have a new wheel cut instead of trying to insert new teeth. Will replaced teeth be strong enough in the great wheel? Plus, are possibly more teeth on great wheel that are marginal and will give problems?

Andy
 

MartinM

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Jun 24, 2011
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I'd do as Randy has directed as it's always worked for me. But I've also never done it on a fusee.
Any idea what might have caused the teeth to be bent?
Was the spring exceptionally gunky and sticking, a lot?
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
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Calif. USA
There is a good chance that this was caused by tangle
cables. They can get bird nested and then under tension,
release suddenly. These look like spring failure but two
of them lets me think it was something else.
People have a tendency to think that a bird nested cable
will straighten it self out if they just let is run for a while.
On weight driven movements, it has put weights through
the bottom of movements.
Tinker Dwight
 

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