Who was NAWCC member 334?

Discussion in 'Horological Misc' started by rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Aug 8, 2019.

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  1. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Figural trade signs were a common sight on the main streets of many American towns and cities. The explanation for the use of these figural signs was that literacy rates were low (I don't buy that explanation especially for certain parts of the country, e.g., New England, where people were expected to read and know the Bible).

    These signs might take the form of everything from boots to spectacles. Signs in the form of a pocket watch were used by those who sold and repaired them often along with jewelry, spectacles and so on. They were double sided and hung above the side walk so they could be clearly seen from either direction. In this image from a postcard of a typical American main street, one can just make out such a sign on the viewers right hand side of the street:

    main street.jpg

    Note how everyone is dressed up. Going shopping "down town" was an event for which people dressed. Well into the 20th century, many older women recall that wearing a proper hat and gloves to do so was de rigueur. No shorts and tank tops to go Walmart or the mall.

    The earlier watch shaped signs were carved from wood and painted. Later versions were made from cast iron or cast iron and zinc. These were typically factory made. I've actually seen catalogs from which such latter signs could be ordered. Both types were often repainted, sometimes multiple times, over their history as they were exposed to the elements and faded.

    I recently picked up this 19th century double sided cast iron and zinc pocket watch trade sign. Here are pix of both sides:

    clock sign 2.JPG clock sign 1.JPG

    The dial was repainted at some time. Note letters spelling out the name of the business have replaced the numerals. What really got my attention was "NAWCC/No. 334. This is a rather low membership #. I would think from the '40's or '50's?? Anyone know who is/was associated with that #??

    RM
     
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  2. Ethan Lipsig

    Ethan Lipsig Registered User
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    I cannot help you identify Member 334, but I can contribute photos I took of two European figurative pocket watch signs, the first for a Stockholm shop, and the second for the Beyer shop in Zurich.

    116_1637_edited.JPG IMG_4444.JPG
     
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  3. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks.

    The ones you post appear to be functional "street clocks".

    Older figural watch signs similar to mine were also used in European cities. In fact, figural signs in general were widely used in Europe as here...boots, hats, gloves and even pretzels.

    More on topic I ask if there a list or registry of all of the NAWCC member #'s that can be accessed??

    RM
     
  4. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Perhaps Pam Lindenberger in Member Services can help (plindenberger@nawcc.com). If there are no privacy concerns in releasing the info., she may be able to find it.
     
  5. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thank you!

    RM
     
  6. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #6 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Aug 9, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
    Sorry, that email address comes up as undeliverable.

    The url ends in ".org".

    RM
     
  7. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    It's not .com, it's .org

    Frank
     
  8. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks!

    I think our replies crossed in the mail, so to speak.

    I actually called Ms. Lindenberger whose # is listed on the site to confirm the email address and let her know it was on its way. Very nice and helpful!

    RM
     
  9. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Apologies. I tiresomely mistyped.
     
  10. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    No worries!

    You still pointed me in the right direction.

    RM
     
  11. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Well, with the kind assistance of Ms. Linderberger, the mystery is solved.

    This # was issued in 11/1946 to the late Mr. Ray Walker. So, a rather early member.

    The NAWCC records show he resided in New Hampshire. However, this Bulletin article from 1948 lists his address as Haverhill, MA:

    https://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1940/articles/1948/23/23_83.pdf

    So, I assume that NH was his last address.

    That's exciting for me as I live not too far from Haverhill, MA.

    He appears to have had an interest in Howards at least based upon these 2 articles:

    https://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1950/articles/1958/72/72_96.pdf

    https://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1950/articles/1956/64/64_245.pdf

    He may have more publications, but this is what I found quickly.

    Mr. Walker appears to have been elevated to a FNAWCC in 1959.

    Anyone out there who knew him, had been to his clock shop, etc??

    RM
     
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