Who was Gottlieb Loll a Berlin?

Bernhard J.

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Hi,

I have the chronometer shown below, which comprises a couple of interesting features, in particular the adjustable chronometer spring. Whereas in most chronometers the spring block is fixed to the plate and in case of wear of the tip of the passing spring, the spring must be removed and the passing spring relocated on the spring (a very delicate job), the spring in this watch may be easily adjusted in longitudinal direction by means of an adjustment screw. If the passing spring shows wear, then it is a 10 minutes job re-adjusting the spring as a whole, and without the need to remove any parts of the escapement. absolutely marvelous and obviously not for mass production purposes.

The only reference I found to this watchmaker is a watch with dead beat independent second, nothing else. It seems rather weird, that a fellow makes just a few of such indiviual and complicated watches, but never ever someone wrote about him whatever. Perhaps someone here has some further infomation.

Cheers, Bernhard

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gmorse

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Hi Bernhard,

This balance is not unlike the early John Arnold models, with the large weights threaded onto the ends of the very short arms, and the adjustable detent foot is similar to the Penningtons' dovetail arrangement. This maker was clearly quite an individualist!

Regards,

Graham
 
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Bernhard J.

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Hi Graham,

Yes, the balance looks just like an Arnold Z balance.

The adjustability appears to be an improved version over the Pennington arrangement and in the following photo I have marked the relevant parts.

The spring is fixed with the screw F, which engages through a slotted hole S. The adjusting screw A has a very fine thread and engages in a groove N of the spring. For adjustment screw F is opened by a small fraction of a turn and the depth of the passing spring is corrected by turning the screw A. If correct, the screw F is fixed again. The spring block is guided in the plate block, so that movement is only possible in longitudinal direction (just like in the Pennington arrangement).

I just recently had bought a classical Earnshaw chronometer and upon delivery noted that the passing spring misses in a position, wherein the balance is below the spring (no excessive wear of the balance staff, but apparently sufficient play to allow for the fault). After checking back with the vendor, an UK dealer, he was happy for me to try to correct this by opening the screw fixing the spring block, gently forcing the block in direction of the balance (hoping for sufficient play in the positioning pin of the spring block), and fixing the screw again. It worked out perfectly, but also showed that this adjustment can be a matter of a few microns, perhaps.

Cheers, Bernhard

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gmorse

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Hi Bernhard,

Does this adjustment move the entire detent? It doesn't appear to apply to the passing spring separately, similar to this Earnshaw type, (non-adjustable), from a Dent.

DSCF5461.JPG

Regards,

Graham
 

Bernhard J.

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Hi Graham,

Yes, the entire detent is moved, just like in the Pennington arrangement. This avoids having to fine-adjust the passing spring on the detent, which is a very delicate job you need to carry out in case of the classical non-adjustable Earnshaw type. In consequence the locking stone is moved as well, but because we are talking of dislocations in a range clearly below 1/10th of a mm, this does not really have any noticable effect on the locking action.

When making the classical Earnshaw type escapement, you typically fix the passing spring to the detent, then position the detent block relatively to the base plate (the fixing screw has considerable play in its fixing hole) so that the passing spring and locking stone both work fine, then you drill a hole through the detent block and into the base plate, through which the positioning pin is stuck. Thus, the detent cannot be moved any more, except of the remaining play (if at all) between the hole in the detent block and the positioning pin. If such play is insuffient for re-adjusting the tip of the passing spring, then you need to remove the complete detent and reposition the passing spring thereon. Not really funny, since we are talking of less than 1/10 of a mm. A bad shortcut chosen by some repairers is to completely remove (or cut off) the positioning pin or to replace it by one of significantly smaller diameter for avoiding this.

Cheers, Bernhard
 
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gmorse

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Hi Bernhard,
In consequence the locking stone is moved as well, but because we are talking of dislocations in a range clearly below 1/10th of a mm, this does not really have any noticable effect on the locking action.
Yes, that would only mean a fraction of a degree difference in the angle at which the escape is unlocked and hence the impulse is given.

Regards,

Graham
 
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Bernhard J.

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The only reference I found to this watchmaker is a watch with dead beat independent second, nothing else.
I have now found additional information with respect to this referenced watch, it is here and apparently in a quite sorry state. It seemes that no number is inscripted.

 

VinSer

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This one had escaped me. AMAZING!!!!! :eek:

Ciao
 
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Tom McIntyre

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I have now found additional information with respect to this referenced watch, it is here and apparently in a quite sorry state. It seemes that no number is inscripted.

I do not know if the rules have changed, but at one time a visitor to the Horological Student's Room could photograph objects in the collection and share them with the museum if the museum wanted them. That was before cell phones when I was visiting individually rather than in a group.
 
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