Who Made This Movement

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by sylvester12, Nov 4, 2019.

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  1. sylvester12

    sylvester12 Registered User

    Oct 17, 2015
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    Hi does anyone recognize who made this movement. It has two broken mainsprings just wondering if its worth fixing or not.


    DSC07039.JPG DSC07040.JPG DSC07041.JPG DSC07042.JPG DSC07043.JPG
     
  2. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Posably a Junghans. It should be an easy job to replace the springs, assuming nothing is broken. I'm pretty sure his movement has bayonet style barrels, so be sure to figure out exactly how they are made before taking the gear plates off. They should come apart easly, without using much force. Willie X
     
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  3. sylvester12

    sylvester12 Registered User

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    Thanks Willie X much appreciated.
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    The springs more than likely broke at the ends, and can be re-holed and used. New springs are not reliable these days unless you can insure they are not made in India.
    It's pretty odd though, that both springs would be broken. Are you sure it's not the clicks?
     
  5. JimmyOz

    JimmyOz Registered User

    Feb 21, 2008
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    Looking at the front of the movement it does look as, at least, the left click spring is to far away from the click.
     
  6. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Agreed. It looks bent upward.
     
  7. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    I agree - and not only does it seem to be bent upwards, it also seems to be much thinner gauge wire than the other one.

    JTD
     
  8. sylvester12

    sylvester12 Registered User

    Oct 17, 2015
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    Hi thanks for all the comments on the movement. The springs on both trains are deformed at the winding arbors, it needs click wheels, clicks and springs. Someone has really played with this clock and it's not worth fixing. It's just a 40s mantle clock.
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Replace or repair the click wheels and click springs Reform the inner coils of the main springs and give it a shot.

    This is basic clock repair, like clock repair 101. So, if you are wanting to learn clock repair, the teacher is sitting there in front of you ...

    WIllie X
     
  10. sylvester12

    sylvester12 Registered User

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    Hi will the springs keep their shape when I reform them or will the arbor slip again. The springs are probably 1/4 inch away from the arbor on all sides.
     
  11. sylvester12

    sylvester12 Registered User

    Oct 17, 2015
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    I basically bent the springs so they fit the arbor tight and put the movement back together. It runs ok but I told the person who owns it not to run it because it's not safe the click wheels and clicks are bad
     
  12. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Yes, a click failure often results in the unwinding of the center coil.

    It's not a good idea to let anything leave your shop with faulty winding parts. This can spell bad news for your customer, the clock, and you. It's a lose/lose/lose situation!

    WIllie X
     
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