Which maker made this clock please?

ChrisM

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Aug 15, 2021
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Hi all!

Is anyone able to tell me which maker made this clock please?

1656283385494.png

1656283413326.png

Thanks!

Chris
 

new2clocks

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Hi all!

Is anyone able to tell me which maker made this clock please?

View attachment 714512

View attachment 714513

Thanks!

Chris
The trademark on your dial belongs to Badische Uhrenfabrik, a German company. It is also known as Baduf (Badische Uhrenfabrik). The trademark was registered in 1890, so we know it is not older than 1890, and the 'Made in Germany' on the dial indicates the clock was made after 1909.

Regards.
 

KurtinSA

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This appears to be a 400-day clock...maybe a moderator can move it to the appropriate forum. From notes I've saved, Badische never "made" the movement, but rather assembled a clock based upon movements from other suppliers. Typically, they got movements from Huber, Jahresurhrenfabrik (JUF), or Hauck. We'd have to see the back plate to get a better idea of who might have manufactured the movement.

The pendulum is an unusual one...don't seem them that often.

Kurt
 

Schatznut

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That's a very nice clock, by the way!
 

jmclaugh

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Nice clock, afaik it is unusual to see them in a case.
 

ChrisM

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This appears to be a 400-day clock...maybe a moderator can move it to the appropriate forum. From notes I've saved, Badische never "made" the movement, but rather assembled a clock based upon movements from other suppliers. Typically, they got movements from Huber, Jahresurhrenfabrik (JUF), or Hauck. We'd have to see the back plate to get a better idea of who might have manufactured the movement.

The pendulum is an unusual one...don't seem them that often.

Kurt
Hi Kurt! Thanks for your reply. Picture of backplate here. Cheers

German clock.jpg
 

KurtinSA

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It appears to be plate 1015 in the 400-Day Repair Guide. From other information and updates that are being compiled, the movement was made by Andreas Huber.

Kurt
 

ChrisM

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It appears to be plate 1015 in the 400-Day Repair Guide. From other information and updates that are being compiled, the movement was made by Andreas Huber.

Kurt
Hi! Thanks for this information. Now please pardon my ignorance but...what is a 400 day clock please?
Cheers, Chris
 

KurtinSA

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Hi! Thanks for this information. Now please pardon my ignorance but...what is a 400 day clock please?
Cheers, Chris
The "400-day" represents the number of days it should run on a single wind. They are also called anniversary clocks (the term was actually patented early on), which suggests that a good winding point would be on the celebration of an anniversary. Note a clock like this that is need of a cleaning, etc., might not run the full 400 days. On other clocks, you might find they are called 8-day or 30-day clocks, again indicating how long it is designed to run on a single wind.

Kurt
 
Last edited:

ChrisM

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The "400-day" represents the number of days it should run on a single wind. They are also called anniversary clocks (the term was actually patented early on), which suggests that a good winding point would be on the celebration of an anniversary. Note a clock like this that is need of a cleaning, etc., might not run the full 400 days. On other clocks, you might find they are called 8-day or 30-day clocks, again indicating how long it is designed to run on a single wind.

Kurt
Wow! That must be some spring! Thanks for that. Cheers, Chris
 

KurtinSA

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I don't think it's necessarily the spring. Some of the springs used in anniversary clocks are also called out for other clocks. It has to do with how the power is released and used, basically the design of the movement. An anniversary clock beats 8 times (typically) a minute. So, a little bit of the spring power is released with each tick of the clock. Other clocks have dozens or hundreds (certainly a lot) of beats per minute. More beats per minute, a faster use of power stored in the spring.

Kurt
 

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