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Where can I find info/pics of Waltham Stone Movement?

B

Brad McCormick

I'd like to learn more about the
Waltham Stone Movement watch.

I'd like to find some pictures to
see what sounds
like it must be a celestial beauty!

Any info will be appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
 
B

Brad McCormick

I'd like to learn more about the
Waltham Stone Movement watch.

I'd like to find some pictures to
see what sounds
like it must be a celestial beauty!

Any info will be appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
 

Kent

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Silver Member
Aug 26, 2000
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Country
Brad:

Photos of 16-size No. 12 appear on the front cover of the October 1999 Bulletin, which contains several paragraphs about it on page 577.

Pictures of others, and a longer description of the movements are on pages 590-1 of the October 1996 Bulletin. There is also a photo of a red crystal movement on the back cover.

Newer members may borrow back issues of the Bulletin by mail from the NAWCC Library.

Kent
 
B

Brad McCormick

I thank Kent much for this
information -- it gave me
a definite reason to join NAWCC --> so
I can borrow those issues!
 

Kent

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Silver Member
Aug 26, 2000
18,556
2,027
113
Country
Gee Wayne, you could have at least waited until Brad sent his check off.
;)
 

MikeB

Registered User
Apr 12, 2001
181
0
0
Hi-

The December 1999 issue of Smithsonian Magazine has a beautiful photograph of a crystal plate Waltham, No. 21, on the cover. It also has a great article on clocks and watches.

You may still be able to find it at your local library.

Mike.
 

Kent

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Silver Member
Aug 26, 2000
18,556
2,027
113
Country
Ok, Kent, is that better?
Wayne, I don't care what Jon says, you're alright!

Kent :)

[This message has been edited by Kent (edited 05-27-2001).]
 
B

Brad McCormick

Gee... I didn't know I was
contributing to Channel 13....

Anyway, I gave my credit card # on the
website already, so there was no danger of
losing the donation.

***I do note, however, that the website
form does not accept American
Express credit card #s because they
have 15 digits. You wouldn't
want to make a watth with the
wrong number of teeth on a gear....
 
B

Barry Parker

Hi Brad,

In addition to the references already given, you may wish to check out crystal plate watches #17 and #21 which are illustrated on pages 130 & 131 in the book, "The Time Museum Historical Catalogue of American Pocket Watches" by Donald Robert Hoke"

In NAWCC RE-print #3, the NAWCC Bulletin Dec.1954 Whole No.56 Vol.VI, No.6 on page 311, has an article,"Foreman Wills' Crystal Watches, by J.E.Coleman.
Note references to:-
1. March 1888 A 16 size brass & crystal sent to England.
2. June 1888 A 16 size with striped agate pillar plate, clear crystal top plate & cock, skeleton pattern dial with rubies at minutes, sapphires at hours in a recent (1888??) 18K skeleton case with pendant at 3 o'clock.
3. July 1888 A watch with both plates crystal, rubies set in sapphires??, skeleton pattern dial with rubies for minutes and diamonds each hour in a skeleton gold case.
4. October 1888 A 4 size with crystal top plate, ruby jewels in both plates. Case made of crystal in one piece, the pillar plate and dial making the front.
(Look for a copy of the 1890 issues of "American Jeweler") There is no mention of any other crystals in the 1889 volume.
From these two 1888 mentions of "skeleton" cases in gold and the crystal one piece case, it would appear that they were available in different styles of case, but there is no mention of who the casemakers were.

In NAWCC RE-print #5, the NAWCC Bulletin for Dec.1960 Whole No.89 Vol.IX, No.7 on page 492, there is an article,"My Favorite Watches, by Charles Kalish which refers to, Crystal plate watch #48 (pictured)
There is also a reference to Crystal plate watch #485 in a letter from the Waltham Watch Company, dated May 27, 1930, saying,"we have manufactured but 100 of these watches. This information was correct and the reason that your friend's watch is #48, whilst yours is #485, is that these movements were not numbered consecutively."

In NAWCC RE-print # 6, the NAWCC Bulletin for Feb.1962 Whole No.96 Vol.X, No.2 on page 144 continued on p.146, there is an article,"Some Helpful Notes on Drilling Glass", by Tom H. Armstrong Watertown, Wis. which refers to, "a broken "glass" plate.
A Crystal plate watch is illustrated together with a picture of the broken plate.
Interestingly, Mr Armstrong makes no reference to 'crystal', but it is obvious that the movement is, or was, originally a crystal plate watch as evidenced by the damascening and engraving on the pillar plate.
Unfortunately, I cannot make out the serial number on the movement from the picture, but someone with an original Bulletin copy may be able to see the serial number.

However, this particular watch having had a replacement plate made from glass could not now be considered as being in 'original' condition.

A previous watch board discussion on the composition and identification of rock crystal and glass, resulted in some crystal watches actually being tested and, according to one correspondent, one of these had actually tested as glass.
Perhaps this was the, so far unidentified, watch for which Mr Armstrong made the new replacement glass plate?

I have been advised that the links to Crystal plate No.12 large pictures, on my web page, are broken and I would email them to you on request.
Regards, Barry Parker
 
B

Brad McCormick

Again, thanks to everybody for all the
good information.

This is slightly off topic, but it's
something I can contribute: One of the
great artworks of the early
20th century was a painting on
glass, that broke, and the artist put
it back together and sandwiched it
between two intact sheets of glass.
Marcel Duchamp's "The Bride Stripped
Bare by Her Bachelors Even" (1915-23):
http://www.georgetown.edu/departments/amer_studies/limit/h31.html

(the picture looks ugly, because, being
entirely see-thru, the artwork
takes on the coloration of its surrounding,
and apparently this picture was
taken against a brown background)

[This message has been edited by Brad McCormick (edited 05-28-2001).]
 

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