Whats your single favorite pocket watch in your collection?

model1857guy

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Your favorite watch in your collection. What is it? Why is it?

For me, its not my highest grade or rarest. Its a simple American Watch Co 1857, 11 jewel, P.S.Bartlett grade made in 1866. For me its just really clean, no issues, keeps prefect time to within +/- 20 sec per week. It looks to still be in its original case.

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musicguy

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In reality I don't have a favorite PW(I do have some least favorites in my collection), but one feature I really like
on a movement is a jeweled barrel. I have the 12s Elgin 19j B.W. Raymond version, and the 16s 19j Elgin B.W. Raymond
version now I'm looking to get the 18s grade 240 B.W. Raymond.

So here is my 1913 19j 16s B.W. Raymond.

Rob 306558.jpg
 

RandyF

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I am new to collecting pocket watches and I only have three...so far. My favourite is my Waltham 645. It could use a clean and some adjusting but I love it. It's about 60 to 90 seconds off and that is much better than I had anticipated.
I am at a disadvantage in that I do not work on watches, so I don't get to tweak any I have.
This one is in the best condition as well. I feel myself becoming partial to Walthams.

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Randy:
It doesn't take too much skill to learn to Regulate your watch.
Check out how to regulate a Star Regulator on your Waltham.
This will allow you to change the timekeeping rate of the watch
up to a few minutes(plus or minus) per day.
There are also YouTube videos that show how to regulate a watch.

...............and your
Waltham 645 is a nice looking watch.



Rob


 
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RandyF

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Randy:
It doesn't take too much skill to learn to Regulate your watch.
Check out how to regulate a Star Regulator on your Waltham.
This will allow you to change the timekeeping rate of the watch
up to a few minutes(plus or minus) per day.
There are also YouTube videos that show how to regulate a watch.

...............and your
Waltham 645 is a nice looking watch.



Rob


Thank you, Rob. I just adjusted it and will check later to see how it looks. I will check the group for adjusting a Hamilton 936 now.
I appreciate your help.
 

Clint Geller

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My favorite watch would have to be either my gold Waltham AT&Co Grade 16KW that was presented to Brigadier General [actually, already brevet Major General] John Wallace Fuller by the officers and men of the 27th Ohio Infantry, in 1865; or the silver Waltham AT&Co Grade Model 1859 that was carried by a young man named John Hodges, Jr. of Salem MA throughout most of the Civil War.

I love the gold 16KW, which had belonged to the late Dr. William Heilman, because John Fuller was a very illustrious - I would even venture to say famous (in his day) - federal commander. At the Battle of Second Corinth, near Corinth Mississippi, on October 3-4, 1862, a critical battle for control of the Confederacy's last remaining east-west rail line, Fuller's brigade anchored a key position in the federal line in front of a small artillery emplacement called Battery Robinet. Their defense of the position was nothing short of heroic. Several companies of Fuller's brigade, which was known as "Fuller's Ohio Brigade," as his four regiments were all Ohioans, died to a man in position without yielding ground. Run low on ammunition, Fuller's regiments were finally pushed back a hundred yards. Then a fresh Missouri regiment joined them, and all five regiments fixed bayonets and charged back up the hill, capturing the flag of one of the Texas regiments that had briefly gained the fort, and driving them off. Immediately after the battle, the federal army commander, Major General William Rosecrans, rode up to the position and dismounted. Seeing the continuous mass of blue and gray bodies piled several deep in front of the position where Old Glory once again flew, he removed his hat and bowed to the troops in silence, before making a very flattering speech. Battery Robinet at Second Corinth was but one of three especially shining moments in the history of Fuller's brigade. At Parker's Crossroads, TN, on December 31, 1862, Fuller's brigade succeeded in sneaking up on none other than the Confederate irregular cavalry genius, Nathan Bedford Forrest, while he was issuing surrender demands to another federal unit. Fuller's men surprised Forrest's horse holders and forced him to flee, losing 300 men, 350 horses and 7 cannon in the process. (This was the occasion on which Forrest had to execute his famous "attack in both directions" to avoid a greater disaster.) Then during the Battle of Atlanta, in July of 1864, Fuller was commanding a division, when after repulsing a surprise Confederate assault on his front, a second rebel column found a gap between Fuller's division and the adjacent federal unit. The Confederates were around his flank and almost into his rear and were pouring musket fire into the Ohio Brigade's flank. Fuller right wheeled the brigade under heavy enemy fire - an extremely difficult maneuver - and then took the 27th Ohio's colors from the color sergeant and personally led a countercharge that broke the momentum of the Confederate assault and killed its commanding general. An image of a well-known illustration, drawn in the 1880s, is shown below of Fuller, with the colors in his hand, rallying his brigade at the Battle of Atlanta.

My other favorite watch was carried by a "first defender" of the Union, a young Harvard student named John Hodges, Jr. from Salem, Mass., who had enlisted in early 1861 as a private in the Salem Zouaves, in response to President Lincoln's initial call for troops. He rose quickly through the ranks, to First Lieutenant in the 19th MA Infantry, then to Major in the 50th MA Infantry, and finally to the Lieutenant Colonel and C.O. (as the colonel had been bumped up to brigade command) of the 59th MA Infantry. The 59th MA fought throughout the entire bloody Overland Campaign of May-June, 1864, as Grant pushed the Army of the Potomac relentlessly south towards Richmond against Lee's fierce resistance. Lt. Colonel Hodges was KIA by a Confederate shell during the Battle of The Crater, part of the Siege of Petersburg, on July 31, 1864. His older brother, Thorndike Deland Hodges, who had been a Captain in the First North Carolina Volunteers (a unit of freedmen with white officers), contributed five pages about John to the "Harvard Memorial Biographies." In that piece, Thorndike quotes from a letter he received after his brother's death, which states that John's pockets were examined, and a pencil, a piece of paper and a watch were recovered from his pockets, which were enclosed with the letter. Thus, documentary proof exists that the watch was in John Hodges Jr.'s pocket when he was killed in action! 310631.jpg 310632.jpg 310633.jpg

Fuller Watch Cuvette and Presentation.jpg Fuller Watch Dial.jpg Fuller Watch Movement.jpg Hodges Watch Cuvette and Inscription.jpg J Hodges dial cropped.jpg J Hodges Movt cropped.jpg Photo of Major John Hodges.jpg Harvard Mem Bios V2 p 306-7.PNG
 
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John Cote

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For an online chapter, of which I am a member, we were asked to talk about the 3 watches from our collections which we would save from being run over by a steam-roller if we could save only 3. The 3 (no steam-roller) watches have probably changed since this exercise but my favorite 1 is probably the same. It is not the most valuable but is has a couple of things going for it...to me. It was owned, before I owned it by two collectors who were mentors of mine and it has hometown (Indy) heritage.

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musicguy

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The one picture shows his epaulets
Fantastic

My other favorite watch was carried by a "first defender"
of the Union, a young Harvard student named John Hodges
How did you acquire this watch?


Plus the hands on that Ball RR above are great!


Rob
 

musicguy

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I have always appreciated the aesthetics of the Elgin Interchangeable (Convertible) models.
I agree


Rob
 

Clint Geller

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Added the photo of the Tobias movement. anyone here that can repair a fusee chain?
Nice watch with a nice provenance, and a direct ancestor too! Great to have the epaulettes along with the watch. I'm hoping to find a Civil War officer's engraved presentation watch along with his presentation sword some day.
 

richiec

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Even have his metal hat emblem and buttons from the coat along with his everyday epaulets and the metal case the dress epaulattes came in.
 

Clint Geller

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Even have his metal hat emblem and buttons from the coat along with his everyday epaulets and the metal case the dress epaulattes came in.
Terrific. By the way, those particular kind of epaulettes are usually called shoulder boards, for obvious reasons.
 

richiec

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As a side bar, I attached them to a wool coat to reenact someone in a cemetery where we lived in NY on Halloween in 2008, they are no prize to have on your shoulders. Back in the day I guess there were better ways to attach them than to make holes and tie them to your shoulders. Probably the first time they had been worn since 1852. Love your watch, Clint, I love doing the genealogy on the names engraved on watches and wonder why family members discard this stuff.
 

RJSoftware

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My favorite pocket watch is usually the one I fixed the most recent. (That is if it was mine). Once the victory charm has dissipated then I usually go back to my old Elgin key wind / key set. It's got all kinds of little issues, but it's a sweet chunky piece of metal. Feels good in my hand and is near always warm in my pocket.
 
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Spartcom5

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This was my fifth pocket watch I think? Hamilton 946. My favorite because it was a pawn shop rescue and is one of Hamilton's finest pocket watches ever made! The picture is of me with the pocket watch open in the pawn shop. It had been there for 6 months and nobody had ever opened it because nobody knew how and everyone was gawking at the movement even I was when I saw 23 jewels.
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rolandantrobus

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I have the opposite problem, ie trying to find my least favourite watch!
I've had to limit my collection (you all know why! Ha Ha) so if I see and buy another watch I have to pick my least favourite one and sell it. It used to be easy, some had issues but after many years of this it's difficult. I love them all.
 

John Cote

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I have the opposite problem, ie trying to find my least favourite watch!
I've had to limit my collection (you all know why! Ha Ha) so if I see and buy another watch I have to pick my least favourite one and sell it. It used to be easy, some had issues but after many years of this it's difficult. I love them all.
It gets harder and harder. The solution is to start buying more....so you can sell more... :chuckling:
 

PapaLouies

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Hi richiec,

I've never seen a M.I. Tobias & Co. watch with an unsigned dial.

Regards, PL
 

RJSoftware

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That Hamilton is sweet. Hamilton's generally are in my opinion. Looks like they have a whiplash type regulator like Illinois but not same. I can't tell how it regulates, but it looks to have an offset cam under center screw maybe.

Nice watch..!
 

Clint Geller

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Fantastic


How did you acquire this watch?


Plus the hands on that Ball RR above are great!


Rob
Sorry, I just noticed your earlier question in reviewing the thread.

I purchased the watch from another NAWCC member who had discovered the Harvard Memorial biography story I mentioned after he acquired the watch - lucky fellow.
 

Ethan Lipsig

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I could divide my collection into loved, cherished, tolerated, and troublesome categories, but I haven't a single favorite. Some of my watches fit into more than one category, such as the diamond-rimmed platinum Cartier watch shown below, which fits into at least the loved and troublesome categories.

I love it for its elegance, extreme thinness, and history. Its original owner was A.E. Lefcourt, who was the leading developer of skyscrapers in New York until he was wiped out in the depression. Many of his building still stand, such as the building shown below, which I believe is across the street from the main branch of the New York Public Library. I bought the watch from A.E. Lefcourt's elderly grandson.

The watch also if firmly esconced in my troublesome category because my watchmaker told me that the plates are so thin, the watch was nearly impossible to service. Worse yet, I live in fear of the mainspring breaking, because replacement mainsprings are seemingly impossible to get for ultra thin watches such as these.

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PapaLouies

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Hi richiec,

I've never seen a M.I. Tobias & Co. watch with an unsigned dial.

Regards, PL
I should have been a bit more precise and stated; I've never seen an M.I. Tobias & Co. full plate watch with an enamel dial and the set-up on the barrel bridge with an unsigned dial.
 
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Clint Geller

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Clint,
What about the Howards in your collection? What are your favorite Howard watches that you own?
Scott
Scott,

I had a very fine Howard collection once. I decide me to let them go. They all went to very good homes. Most went to good friends. I don't love them any less than I used to, but I decided to strike out in a new direction. I collect watches with Civil War combatant provenances now. Thus far, I haven't found any Howards with such a characteristic. I know they're out there, and I'll eventually find one. Of course, if I ever found Josiah Moorhouse's personal watch, I'd be a buyer. Think that's a pipe dream? Well, the Waltham dial room foreman, Edger Hull's personal watch showed up recently (and on a unique 14 Size rock crystal plate movement, no less!), so why not Moorhouse's watch?
 
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musicguy

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Scott,

I had a very fine Howard collection once. I decide me to let them go. They all went to very good homes. Most went to good friends. I don't love them any less than I used to, but I decided to strike out in a new direction. I collect watches with Civil War combatant provenances now. Thus far, I haven't found any Howards with such a characteristic. I know they're out there, and I'll eventually find one. Of course, if I ever found Josiah Moorhouse's personal watch, I'd be a buyer. Think that's a pipe dream? Well, the Waltham dial room foreman, Edger Hull's personal watch showed up recently (and on a unique 14 Size rock crystal plate movement, no less!), so why not Moorhouse's watch?
It's truly interesting how peoples collecting evolves over time(I know mine has). You have
moved from a collector of watches, to a Historian and author. Now you collect for different
reasons, and motivations. Both different from your original chosen profession.
Did pocket watches lead you to your interest in The Civil War, and
reenactment's, or was that always a passion of yours.




Rob
 

Clint Geller

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Scott,

I had a very fine Howard collection once. I decide me to let them go. They all went to very good homes. Most went to good friends. I don't love them any less than I used to, but I decided to strike out in a new direction. I collect watches with Civil War combatant provenances now. Thus far, I haven't found any Howards with such a characteristic. I know they're out there, and I'll eventually find one. Of course, if I ever found Josiah Moorhouse's personal watch, I'd be a buyer. Think that's a pipe dream? Well, the Waltham dial room foreman, Edger Hull's personal watch showed up recently (and on a unique 14 Size rock crystal plate movement, no less!), so why not Moorhouse's watch?
The lousy grammar was a result of trying to post from my cell phone, while on vacation, away from my computer. Argh.
 

Clint Geller

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It's truly interesting how peoples collecting evolves over time(I know mine has). You have
moved from a collector of watches, to a Historian and author. Now you collect for different
reasons, and motivations. Both different from your original chosen profession.
Did pocket watches lead you to your interest in The Civil War, and
reenactment's, or was that always a passion of yours.




Rob
Well, here goes, trying to post a coherent message from my cell phone again.

I have always been a big history buff, and being a physicist by profession, technological history was a natural nexus of the two. So watch collecting made perfect sense for me. I started as a Waltham and Howard collector. The AWCo and its predecessors are by far the most historically important line of manufacturers in American horology, whereas Howard products represent a unique, quirky, mistyque-laden amalgam of traditional craft elements and modern mass manufacturing concepts. At some point, I decided to sell my Walthams and focus on Howards. I did this for two reasons: first, a major Howard collection was breaking up and I had an inside track on buying the items I wanted out of it. Second, Waltham products were already a quite well plowed field, whereas Howard products were still relatively unknown and mysterious. (The Howard factory records, or most of them anyway, didn't become available for public access until 2002.). So I felt I could become a bigger player and make a bigger scholarly contribution in the Howard line.

But just over 20 years ago, I bought a Waltham PS Bartlett Grade Model 1857 at a local chapter meeting and when I got it home, I discovered that what I had thought were some particularly elaborate repairer's marks scratched into the rear cover turned out to be a miniature diary of the movements of a soldier in the Union Army of the Potomac during the Overland Campaign (aka Wilderness Campaign) of May-June, 1864. In researching the markings, I ended up reading Shelby Foote's celebrated three volume work on the Civil War, and I eventually published a short article on the watch in the BULLETIN.

That particular collecting interest then lay dormant for several years. Then, at some point I decided to begin placing my Howard collection among my friends, so I could continue to visit them from time to time. So for several years, I was still a horologist, but no longer a collector. But the collecting bug was only sleeping, it wasn't dead. So after I got done putting my daughter through the University of Pennsylvania in bioengineering, and then subsidizing her Masters degree at Tufts, I decided to start a modest collection again. (She is an MD-PhD candidate now, so she has a free ride with a modest stipend, but mom and dad still help her out. Yes, I'm a proud dad. Please forgive me.). I knew it was pointless to try and recreate my old Howard collection again, so I struck out in a new direction, offering new scholarly opportunities.

In the process of researching Civil War provenances, I have also ended up studying not only the Civil War itself, but the long road to disunion leading up to the war, and the sad history of reconstruction that followed it. I have found it a very rewarding endeavor. Other than the American Revolution itself, the Civil War was the single most important event in US history. It was the culmination of a long series of successive crises and increasingly desperate compromises that led up to it, and the war itself killed nearly 700,000 Americans and radically transformed the lives of many who survived. It's consequences, in Reconstruction, followed by the long night of Jim Crow, followed by desegregation, followed by many of the continuing struggles of the current period, are all directly traceable to its legacy. Even 150 years after its conclusion, the American Civil War is still shrouded in layers of romantic, politically charged myth, which shape popular understanding of it. So naturally, I find the whole subject irresistible.
 
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GeneJockey

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I haven't commented on this thread so far because I realized that I don't have a favorite watch, or rather that which one is my favorite is always changing. Sometimes, it's one that I've been wanting for a long time and finally got. Sometimes it's one I'd almost forgotten I owned. Sometimes, it's one I had to spend a lot of time and effort on.

One thing about doing your own servicing is that you get to know the watch more intimately, so that there's more to it than just what you see from the outside. This is especially true of the watches I bought as naked movements, then had to find a case for.
 

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Clint,
Thank you for your very interesting and thoughtful explanation of your new endeavor with pocket watches. I wish you the best of luck. There was an important Howard pocket watch owned by Philo Remington (given to him by his employees). He sold small arms to the Union forces. There was a [FONT=&quot]large single rose-cut diamond topping the push and the case was just magnificent. It was sold at J&H for $16,500.00. I stopped bidding on it before that number! It was sold on 5/3/2015 and you can just search the archives to read about it. The watch really is exquisite.
Scott[/FONT]
 

Clint Geller

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Clint,
Thank you for your very interesting and thoughtful explanation of your new endeavor with pocket watches. I wish you the best of luck. There was an important Howard pocket watch owned by Philo Remington (given to him by his employees). He sold small arms to the Union forces. There was a [FONT=&quot]large single rose-cut diamond topping the push and the case was just magnificent. It was sold at J&H for $16,500.00. I stopped bidding on it before that number! It was sold on 5/3/2015 and you can just search the archives to read about it. The watch really is exquisite.
Scott[/FONT]
Hi Scott, thank you sincerely for your good wishes. I'm well aware of the Remington Howard watch. I first held it in my hand about 27 years ago when it was in the collection of my friend, the late Dick Flaute of Columbus, OH. When he sold his collection I had bigger fish to fry, so it went up for auction at J&H. I was the back bidder on it that day. Since then it has changed hands once or twice more. The current owner has generously offered to lend the Remington watch to the Civil War watch exhibit I am organizing at the HQ Museum in 2019.
 
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musicguy

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I haven't commented on this thread so far because I realized that I
don't have a favorite watch, or rather that which one is my favorite is always changing..
This isn't really that serious a thread. I would believe that many of us can't necessarily
pick one favorite. I know I can't. Sometimes my favorite watch is the last one I purchased(researched).
And some of my favorite watches are in other peoples collection :cool:




Rob
 

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I could divide my collection into loved, cherished, tolerated, and troublesome categories, but I haven't a single favorite. Some of my watches fit into more than one category, such as the diamond-rimmed platinum Cartier watch shown below, which fits into at least the loved and troublesome categories.

I love it for its elegance, extreme thinness, and history. Its original owner was A.E. Lefcourt, who was the leading developer of skyscrapers in New York until he was wiped out in the depression. Many of his building still stand, such as the building shown below, which I believe is across the street from the main branch of the New York Public Library. I bought the watch from A.E. Lefcourt's elderly grandson.

The watch also if firmly esconced in my troublesome category because my watchmaker told me that the plates are so thin, the watch was nearly impossible to service. Worse yet, I live in fear of the mainspring breaking, because replacement mainsprings are seemingly impossible to get for ultra thin watches such as these.

310849.jpg 310845.jpg 310846.jpg 310847.jpg 310848.jpg
Your watch should not be in any danger. It has three big studs protecting the balance. :)
 
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Clint Geller

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Hi Scott, thank you sincerely for your good wishes. I'm well aware of the Remington Howard watch. I first held it in my hand about 27 years ago when it was in the collection of my friend, the late Dick Flaute of Columbus, OH. When he sold his collection I had bigger fish to fry, so it went up for auction at J&H. I was the back bidder on it that day. Since then it has changed hands once or twice more. The current owner has generously offered to lend the Remington watch to the Civil War watch exhibit I am organizing at the HQ Museum in 2019.
Correction: Dick Flaute was from Dayton, not Columbus.
 

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Mine is a Elgin Model 1, "Advance", produced in 1878. I was after a KW/KS 19 th century piece to add to my collection. Realizing my dream of a CW era piece is outside my budget as a new collector I found this beauty. It is my first KW/KS and far from a "settle on" piece. Being produced only 13 years after wars end its era reflective and brings a smile to my face when I see the 19th Century charm and craftsmanship. Even as my collection grows , this being my first KW/KS will always be special to me. 311033.jpg
 

musicguy

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I looked at the eBay listing for your watch and it looks very clean
Nice pick up! Love the Elgins

And it was Serviced, a Big plus.
Also it looks like it could be in it's original case,
I don't see any extra case screw marks.


Rob
 
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artbissell

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Long term Gruen p.w. collector. The 50th Anniversary of 1924 is popular as a collectible and I have a couple, but I am certain I have a prototype. Not a finely finished retail or custom product. Its 140,000 serial is years earlier than 1924 but similarly hand engraved and gold plated using their best grade movement. Maybe a unique best Gruen collectible? artbissell

311150.jpg a4.jpg 311144.jpg actual 50th

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musicguy

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You really have a quality collection of pocket watches Art.
The movement is really beautiful.
Please post a photo of the dial as well if you can.

Thanks
Rob
 

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Mine is probably this 10 size DD Palmer, with a simple stem wind conversion, because it's a Palmer, a 10 size chronometer, has a custom display case of excellent design (both front and rear covers are friction fit), and is PL signed for "Mrs. C. F. Rudolph Wilmington, Del." - among other things ... :)

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Jerry Treiman

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Mine is probably this 10 size DD Palmer, with a simple stem wind conversion, because it's a Palmer, a 10 size chronometer, has a custom display case of excellent design (both front and rear covers are friction fit), and is PL signed for "Mrs. C. F. Rudolph Wilmington, Del." - among other things ... :)
Very, very neat, Dave. The small size with chronometer escapement is what really grabs me.
 

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