What would you do?

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Bogey, Apr 15, 2018 at 10:40 PM.

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  1. Bogey

    Bogey Registered User

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    This clock came to me through a local estate sale. I want to restore it, but I'm not sure exactly how it should look. If this were your clock, what would you do to it? Does anyone have one of these that shows what it is "supposed" to look like? I've seen pictures that showed all different finishes from gilding to silver/grey. One I saw looked like it had a copper finish, so there appears to be lots of options. It really looks drab the way it is.

    I do want to redo the base. Probably take all the black off and repaint it and the design across the front.

    Any suggestions?

    DSCI0016.JPG DSCI0019.JPG DSCI0020.JPG
     
  2. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    I would do nothing to it other than perhaps clean and oil the movement and make sure it runs properly. In my opinion it looks like it is supposed to look. The chips on the base finish are unfortunate but just signs of typical age wear. I'm afraid any effort to make it look better would only detract from the lovely old clock's looks.

    RC
     
  3. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    The case looks a bit dusty, though I'm not altogether certain how to deal with that. Possibly some putty-like substance pressed into the sculpted details and then peeled off might do it.

    Otherwise, I agree with RC. Be careful. It's a seriously-nifty clock.

    M Kinsler
     
  4. Bogey

    Bogey Registered User

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    The clock runs and strikes (I'm still going to give it a good cleaning), but the bottom is missing along with the gong. I can handle that part.

    I think I'll try a mild soap and warm water with a soft bristle brush to see how the old girl looks.
     
  5. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    I believe the look is original too. Many of the Ansonia statue clocks have the same color.
     
  6. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    It appears to me as though the base finish has been damaged. I don't understand what someone was trying to do around all of the scrolling but it doesn't look original and it doesn't look like patina. I wouldn't be happy with it if it were my clock, but I wouldn't want it refinished to look like new either. I would start by doing a thorough cleaning of the base. GoJo or Goop hand cleaner is non-abrasive. With persistence it will remove dirt and film fairly well. Soap (Dawn or equivalent) and water is an option too. On old toothbrush and the same cleaning solution/gel on "Music". Once you have the base and the Statuette clean, use several coats of a good automobile wax on the base. This will reversibly seal and stabilize the Enameled finish and stop or slow down corrosion/oxidation of the uncovered iron. Then re-evaluate to see if you want to try more aggressive methods yourself, or have a professional restore the finish without making it look brand new. Brown metal wax can give a very nice, somewhat protective finish to the Spelter Statue. See post #9 in this thread for a before and after demonstration of what one can expect: Spelter Figurine Refinishing. Again, since it is wax, it is reversible. It will require periodic reapplication but not as often as you might think...years. It's fast and easy and might be all that is needed. I use metal wax from a company called Sculpt Nouveau but honestly, you could probably try some brown shoe polish on a small, inconspicuous area to see if you want to pursue this method further with more expensive (and hopefully more durable) supplies/materials.

    We really like Ansonia's "Music" and "Poetry" Figure clocks. We have poetry and would like Music, or the double Music-Poetry Clock. That would be something!

    So, my advice would be to clean it up while doing no further damage. Wax them and please share some "after" photos with us to discuss further.

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
  7. Bogey

    Bogey Registered User

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    Thank you for your input Bruce. I like the idea of cleaning up the spelter parts. The base is really badly chipped and flaking. I struggle with leaving it in that state. It really detracts from the overall beaut of this clock. I'll try your suggestions before going any further and will keep you posted.
     
  8. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    I'm with RC. It's an elegant clock with a great finish...don't muck it up.
     
  9. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    a spray bottle with water can get the dust. black wax for base chips. fine tip marker to restore black detail. once restored i might chance mask the lady and clear coat with spray satin the base. evens up the shine.
     
  10. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Super Moderator
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    I'd not touch anything other than the base. Apart from giving all the parts a really good clean. The base I would re-finish. Complete with replacing the missing gold embossing.
     
  11. Bogey

    Bogey Registered User

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    What kind of black wax? That would make it a lot easier. I just don't want to make it look like a "cover up."
     
  12. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg Bogey,
    I have developed a formula for refinishing these iron clock cases.
    Here are some pics of before and after. I think they speak for themselves. I have Ansonia Music but the base was not in bad shape. I simply cleaned it up with some goo and polished it with some Maguires
    PlasteX followed up with Ultimate Quik wax spray. ( not a commercial).
     
  13. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    #13 Fitzclan, Apr 17, 2018 at 11:37 PM
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2018 at 12:00 AM
    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg Here are the results. If you are interested, I would be happy to share my findings.
    You asked "What would you do?" I would strip the base and refinish it so that it would look like it was meant to look.


    Bogey,
    I have developed a formula for refinishing these iron clock cases.
    Here are some pics of before and after. I think they speak for themselves. I have Ansonia Music but the base was not in bad shape. I simply cleaned it up with some goo and polished it with some Maguires PlastX followed up with Ultimate Quik wax.




    Sent from my iPhone
     
  14. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg Here is a pic of my "Music". Don't have any pics of what it looked like when I got it, but the base was much improved without a lot of fuss.
     
  15. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I have Plas X Fitzclan. Good stuff. What about this wax spray? Can you tell us a little more about it?
    Nice clocks! Thanks.
     
  16. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User
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    Be sure not to get the kind that says "with pumice" on the label
     
  17. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Thanks for pointing that out explicitly Biker. I mentoined "non-abrasive" and that's what I meant. I've never used the stuff myself. I picked up Goop from Wal-Mart years ago and that's what I use in situations where I think this type of cleanser is called for.

    I agree that something should be done about Music's base. Someone screwed around with it and it's not in a 'normal" state of aging. It's been abused. My contention, or what I would do is incremental intervention so that I don't "over-react" to the abuse some idiot visited upon the clock at some point in time in its history.
     
  18. Bogey

    Bogey Registered User

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    Nice looking restoration, Fitz. I appreciate all the information. It gives me a lot of options that all seem OK for maintaining the integrity of the clock. I think the base is going to be the toughest choice for me. I am leaning toward stripping it down and starting from scratch with that part. If I can find the black wax, I might try that first. I have enough work to keep me busy for a while, so there is no hurry.
     
  19. lpbp

    lpbp Registered User
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    I would try cleaning and polishing the base using just automobile rubbing compound, and please no clear coat, it could never be removed again without stripping.
     
  20. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    That is sweet restoration, no doubt. PlastX on my list. On black wax to fill large chips etc. I forgot name but skipped that for plaster painted black with acrylic. I forgot because it was quite a while ago. The plaster patch is easier and smother/invisible. Trick is to wetsand to mate, paint black with thin watery mix to stain them glosscoat with satin.

    I have even done this with wood guitars. The plaster makes perfect mating surface, the transparent gloss-coat hides tone change of paint. I have been able to hide damage by extending black area with spraypaint.

    Some clock dials this has worked with excluding black spray paint. The white plaster surface is wetsanded, blended as best I can to match white of dial, sprayed with gloss. Then fine tip marker easily restores black details of dial with loupe.

    The gloss-coat can go on thick
     
  21. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Super Moderator
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    I must be missing something. As the finish on the base has been abused and is far from original or serviceable for that matter, what is the point in preserving it? There comes a time when limited restoration is the best option.
     
  22. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    Hi TAT,
    The Plastx tends to leave a slight film on the black finish but the wax spray seems to remove it nicely leaving a deep clear shine.
    I use it occasionally when dusting. Just spray a small amount on the cloth instead of directly on the case.
    These two products are great for enameled metal cases that are intact but lackluster.
    Clean with gojo first to remove grime then go with PlastX followed by the spray wax.
    Surprisingly easy and surprising results as well.

    The two clocks in the photos were stripped with paint remover and single edge razor blade (in a handle for scraping) and a little steel wool, then wet sanded with 400 & 800 grit, two coats of Krylon primer, 2 coats of semi-gloss a few coats of curator slate blacking (Timesavers ) and then the PlastX/wax treatment.
    Once stripped, the painting can all be done within an hour or so, but be sure to let it cure overnight. The blacking ( slightly diluted with water for easier application with a lint-free cloth), also dries quickly and several coats can be applied in a short period. A hair dryer can be used to speed things along.
    Hope this helps
     
  23. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    BTW, the gojo / plastx / wax trick works well on Adamantine too.
     
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  24. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User
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    The pumice is great for scrubbing your hands. Feels like you're washing your hands with broken glass, but it does a good job. I've never used any of it on clocks, but for cutting grease, I like Joe's Hand Cleaner better than any of it. It's been a few years since I've seen a can of that though; don't know if it's still around or not.
     

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