What To Put On Hammer For Coil Gong?

popeye

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May 8, 2005
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I have an old Ingraham Mantel Clock. Looks like there is something on the hammer that shouldn't be there(looks orange color). When it chimes for the hour it is very very dull. It is a coil chime. I was wondering what I can put on the end of the hammer to get a nice sounding chime. I was thinking felt or cork? What would work best? As always, help appreciated. Thanks. I can list a picture of it.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/popeye/?saved=1
 

popeye

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I have an old Ingraham Mantel Clock. Looks like there is something on the hammer that shouldn't be there(looks orange color). When it chimes for the hour it is very very dull. It is a coil chime. I was wondering what I can put on the end of the hammer to get a nice sounding chime. I was thinking felt or cork? What would work best? As always, help appreciated. Thanks. I can list a picture of it.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/popeye/?saved=1
 

lamarw

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Leather. I generally have a leather boot lace and just cut off a small piece. Clean out the old material, use a little Gorilla glue on the end and insert in the hammer cavity. Don't get too much glue on leather since it will harden the leather. At least this is what I use with a striking hammer on a gong.
 

gvasale

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It a piece of hardened leather. You'll notice new clocks use a piece of plastic inserted in the hammer face, Leather makes a more "mellow" sound. Or you can put a piece of wood in there too, just use hard wood, not soft wood.
 

RL

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popeye,
agreed--yours is a piece of hardened leather(old)--just punch yourself out a new piece and it will be a nice sound.
 

Mike Phelan

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Originally posted by popeye:
When it chimes for the hour it is very very dull. It is a coil chime. I was wondering what I can put on the end of the hammer to get a nice sounding chime.
It is not a chime, but a strike. :)
I'm not being pedantic here, but this does tend to result in a lot of going round the houses when we are giving help on a chiming clock, and several wasted posts later, find it is a striking clock!
 

Richard T.

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It is not a chime, but a strike.

Thanks Mike.

As I have said before, many use the term "chime" when in fact they mean "strike". I think its's a matter of education. Two winding arbors = time/strike; three = chime of some sort. There are a few eceptions to this: both Waterbury and Sessions, if I remember correctly, manufactured two train westminster chime clocks. Have seen one of each recently.
Two racks, quarter rack and hour rack. Also not self-correcting, if I remember correctly, (have to check my notes). I've also heard some "clock" people using strike and chime interchangeably. Seems like they could remember striking is counting the hour and sometimes the half hour and chiming is a sequence of 4, 8, 12 etc. notes struck at the quarters. I'll get off my soap box.

Best Regards

Richard T.
 
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Allan Wolff

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The nice thing about leather is the hardness can be adjusted to change the volume and tone of the gong. I found that soaking the leather in hot water for about 30 seconds and lightly tapping on the table to pack the leather into the hammer produces a nice tone and the volume is about right for my tastes. For a sharper and louder tone the leather can be hardened further by longer soaking or tighter packing. Boiling water can be used for really hard leather. Do an internet search for leather hardening for more information.
 

popeye

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Very interesting, thanks.
 

harold bain

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Popeye, before changing what you have, try bending the hammer slightly away from the gong, so you have a gap of about 1/8 inch at rest. That should improve the sound to a tolerable level. When the hammer hits the gong, it should bounce back off it. Harold
 

Mike Phelan

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Originally posted by Richard T.:
Two winding arbors = time/strike; three = chime of some sort. There are a few exceptions to this: both Waterbury and Sessions, if I remember correctly, manufactured two train westminster chime clocks. Have seen one of each recently.
I have seen a few strange but interesting creations from Junghans where the clock had a full Westminster chime, but two trains.
I have a Junghans movement that is a ting-tang strike, but with an 'optional extra' movement fitted above the main one; it has Westminster chime on the hour!

The article by Claud Reeve years ago in Model Engineer, later to become a book, did this, but had a third train for music.

Of course there are those delectable French carriage grande sonnerie repeaters with just two trains and two quarter racks.
 
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popeye

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Harold you win. That did it it turns out there was leather on the hammer. I moved it off and sounds great. I am so happy, thanks a bunch, everyone!!!
 

tymfxr

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After increasing the size of the hammer photo, I think it looks like a 'modern'type of hammer was put on the wire. Looks like one of those brass hammer and plastic insert type. Am I wrong? MAC
 

popeye

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I thought so also, but after pulling it off and listening to the sound and feeling it it is leather.
 

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