What SWCC Movement is in this clock?

WUTim

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Feb 15, 2021
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Can anyone tell me what movement is in this SWCC clock? My father serviced WU SWCC clocks from the early 1950's to the late 1960's. He owns about 10 clocks ranging from the wooden case clocks, metal case clocks, large walnut and oak clocks, and one very large master clock. All are the F movement which he knows very well. A co-worker friend gave him this "parts" clock 40 years ago where it has laid in his garage. He's been teaching me about the F movement so we decide to get this one out and see if we can get a part off of it for one of his other clocks. After taking the face off, he sees the movement for the first time and has no memory of ever servicing a clock such as this. It has an electric motor which is not shown in the pics. Thanks.

20210216_172027.jpg 20210216_171952.jpg 20210216_172003.jpg
 

Tim Orr

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Good afternoon, Tim!

The motor serves the same purpose as the vibrating assembly on the F-type clocks, to wind the mainspring. You can find a lot of information on Ken Reindel's website:


Best of luck!

Tim Orr
 

WUTim

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Ken's website covers SWCC Style's A, B, C, and F. This movement appears to be after those movements. Besides it's different look, the electric motor is different than what was used in the Style F. Does anyone know the exact style of this clock?

The movement number stamped on it is FR301793. The tag on the metal case is 400842.
 

Tim Orr

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Good evening, Tim!

You can always send a query to Ken Reindel. I know that he is familiar with this movement. They were not very common, and according to Ken, he doesn't like them very much. Apparently, the motors are troublesome and difficult to work on.

Best regards!

Tim
 

shutterbug

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I was going to suggest that it's a slave clock mechanism. That's where several clocks are activated one minute at a time by a "master" clock, so they all read the same time all the time. If that's what you have there, you'll need an impulse movement to activate it. You can find several examples on the web with a google search. If you can determine the voltage required (usually low voltage DC - like a 6 volt battery), you could test it to see if that's what it is. Each touch of the lead wires would activate it by one minute.
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff