What Not to Do

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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I know all of you have discovered things you should not have done in clock repair. I wish someone would have told me about some of these years ago. I will offer a few and hopefully some of you will add to the list.

DO NOT:
1. Use WD-40 on a clock
2. Open a box of bushings up side down
3. Use a loose key to wind a clock
4. Open a movement without springs let down
5. Disassemble without many photos
6. Punch holes in plates to close holes
7. Force pivots into position
8. Oil anything but the pivots and pallets
9. Work in low lighted area
10. Bend levers without knowing their function
 

R. Croswell

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Apr 4, 2006
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I know all of you have discovered things you should not have done in clock repair. I wish someone would have told me about some of these years ago. I will offer a few and hopefully some of you will add to the list.

DO NOT:
1. Use WD-40 on a clock
2. Open a box of bushings up side down
3. Use a loose key to wind a clock
4. Open a movement without springs let down
5. Disassemble without many photos
6. Punch holes in plates to close holes
7. Force pivots into position
8. Oil anything but the pivots and pallets
9. Work in low lighted area
10. Bend levers without knowing their function
Do Not believe all the stuff found on u-tube

RC
 

Jevan

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Jul 31, 2014
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2. Open a box of bushings up side down
Same story,

With the stroke of genius only true idiots possess I decided it was far more efficient to store clock pins in a compartmental plastic box.
The box had twelve individual sizes of approximately 100 pins in each size.

Almost full, over it went :emoji_scream:

I used tweezers to pick up each pin measuring each through a hole gauge before returning them to the box... I have learned nothing.

Capture.JPG
 

shutterbug

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Schatznut

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If it stops for no apparent reason, try winding it before taking it apart.
 

Vernon

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Dec 9, 2006
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Not giving ample testing before returning the repaired clock.
Ignoring a needed repair.
Vernon
 

demoman3955

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Apr 9, 2022
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Jim DuBois

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Jun 14, 2008
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I once bought a very nice Newmans watch clock, time only, that was 100 years old +/-, it was in its original shipping box and appeared unrun/new. It was wound up, it didn't run. Oh well, must need oil? Hmmm, on closer inspection, the 2nd wheel had 89 teeth, not 90. The 90th tooth was never cut, making a very efficient stop works for the clock. A bit of wheelcutting later it worked like a champ. So, our takeaway is to trust nobody on anything, inspect everything, assume nothing, and always take a second look before re-installing the dial and venturing forth.

Scan0009 (2).jpg
 

Swanicyouth

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Nov 10, 2019
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If you’re working on American clocks with helper springs & they look wonky - just make new ones. For some reason I went to great lengths to preserve these things, with the right wire they are pretty easy to just replace.

Any teeny tiny wood screws for wood case clocks are likely stripped. If they are not stripped, the probably will be when you go to put it back together. I just put a tiny piece of toothpick & a drop of hide glue in each hole from the get go.

if the hole is round - it probably doesn’t need a bushing.
 

demoman3955

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Apr 9, 2022
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Never assume that just because there is bob with a clock, that its the only one.
I set a mantel clock up and put the bob on and it wouldnt run. looked inside and found 2 more, and one was wedged in the time gearing.
 

Bohemian Bill

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Nov 5, 2010
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Hi All..Here are some for newbies that come to mind:
1. Don't forgot when removing wall regulator clocks from wall no matter how careful you are, you will need to remove pendulum bob first..I seen too many nice Banjo clock glasses and other regulators reverse painted glasses cracked or damaged from out of control swinging bobs.
2. Also moving some wall clocks around with a heavy bobs attached and also some mantle clocks can change the beat of the clock to a point it may not run well
3. Do not use a hammer to drive tiny nails inside clock door frame when replacing glass. First pre drill wood retainers if necessary then press nails using channel lock pliers and ice cream stick to prevent damage to outer wood frame . Bill
 
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