What movement would you use?

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by pastdarrow, Jun 9, 2011.

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  1. pastdarrow

    pastdarrow Registered User
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    Oct 9, 2007
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    I am contemplating building my own Grandfather Clock with the weights, chimes, the whole works. If you were to do so, what movement would you purchase to install inside the case. I am looking for your expert opinions and recommendations. No strings attached.
     
  2. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    I suppose it would depend on your taste. A 150-200 year old British tall clock movement and dial could easily be found on ebay. If your taste is more towards a modern movement, I would probably go with a Hermle cable drive, probably a 1161-853 triple chimer. Or, if my pockets are deep I might look for a tubular chime movement, perhaps a Hermle 1171-890. There are suppliers of kit clocks that could help you with blueprints and movements.
     
  3. Joe Hollen

    Joe Hollen Registered User
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    I'd go for a David Lindow movement... Again, if pockets are "deep" :) His movements are copies of the 1700's to early 1800's English and American tall Clock movements. Rack and snail strike, Bell chime...

    Joe
     
  4. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    For me, it would totaly depend on the style you plan to make, A contemporary design with lots of glass would look good with the larger Hermle movements. A traditional English style would need something completely different as already suggested by Harrold. The super simple lines of a 'Shaker', case can do with a very simple new or antique movement, time only would be OK. Point being that the movement should 'go with' the case.

    Willie X
     
  5. pastdarrow

    pastdarrow Registered User
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    Thanks for your thoughts and suggestions. You all have been helpful.
     
  6. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    #6 shutterbug, Jul 14, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2011
    I'd just add that you need to determine that before you start the project. You'll have to build the case around the movement and dial. The chances of finding one to fit will otherwise be pretty difficult. Personally, I'd do the cable driven triple chimer with a moon dial as a first project. Or, if you're interested, I have a never used Emperor clock kit, still in the box, that dates from the '70s. It has everything you need except the case and pendulum stick (it does have the bob and hardware). I'll let it go cheap. PM me if interested.
     
  7. Chris8011

    Chris8011 Registered User

    Sep 7, 2011
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    Hello there,
    I use Hermle movements in my clocks.
    1161-853 is great or 1171-850 cable movements.
    I would love to try the 471-890 Tubular movement,but it is very expensive.
    My customer's baulk at the cost.
    Happy clock making.. :)
     
  8. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    If the door and sides are to be solid, then an old English or American movement would be appropriate. If you plan to have glass in the door or sides, then the Hermle movement would be appropriate. But in all cases, buy the movement first and fit the case to it. It is rather annoying to build a case and then find that the movement, purchased later, has a pendulum swing wide enough to hit the sides of the case! Set up the movement first on a stand, run it, and take critical measurements -- like the arc of the pendulum, etc.

    If you have a picture or drawing of the case you plan to make, we may be able to make a better recommendation.

    Best regards,
    Frank Del Greco
     

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