What Kind of Wood for Swedish Mora clock winding spools

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Hudson, Sep 24, 2016.

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  1. Hudson

    Hudson Registered User
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    The spools on the winding arbors on an old Swedish Mora clock are broken and need to be patched or replaced. The weights are hung with cord that winds on the spools.

    What kind of wood is good for winding spools? What is a good source the wood?

    Thanks


    p.s. (I didn't make the offensive black markings on them so don't flame me for that :)
     

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  2. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    If it were mine I think I would try to repair the original part. A fine grain hard wood might be a good choice. You want something that is close color match. Perhaps maple or cherry. If there is no speciality wood supplier near, wood from old furniture could be an option.

    RC
     
  3. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    I'm with RC.
    Make a line of tiny holes, tap in some tiny serrated nails, cut the nail heads off, make a clay mould from the good part of the rim, move the mould to the broken part of the rim, pour in some warmed long cure epoxie (stained to suit), a little fileing and sanding and your good to go. Same method as replacing broken wooden gear teeth. Should get lots of hits in the archives. A vacuum chamber will remove all of the bubbles, but simply warming the epoxie and lightly tapping the good part works well enough.
    Good luck, Willie X
     
  4. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    That's one option but it will be a very obvious repair. I think I would go with wood. Perhaps saw cut straight in from the end just below the damaged area, then with a fine jeweler's saw cut straight down through the side of the spool close to the damaged rim to remove the damaged area. Then glue in a strip of similar wood. When the glue is cured, file and sand the insert to match the diameter and contour of the undamaged part - would be easier with a lathe. Another option if a lathe is available might be to turn off the entire rim and turn a complete new rim for that end of the spool.

    RC
     
  5. Hudson

    Hudson Registered User
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    I was thinking about using my lathe and cutting the entire broken "flange" section off, leaving a step with a shoulder. Then make a new flange, a disk like thing with a hole, finished and bored to fit perfectly on the stepped shoulder. Then just glue it on. I need some close grained wood that won't split when I go to machine it. I am trying to decide what wood to use to make the flange.

    On the web there are places that sell hardwood "turning blocks". Some are green fresh cut coated with wax and some are kiln dried. Which would be better for this?
     
  6. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    #6 Willie X, Sep 25, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2016
    Any close grain hardwood should be fine. Maple comes to mind. An old rolling pin or cutting board should be good. Find a cabinet shop, they throw away loads of beautiful small blocks of wood of every description.
    Kiln dried should be good. Old would be better. I would use epoxie and very light pressure to bond the new ring onto the old spool. Moisture (from glue) is not your friend, especially when you are dealing with thin pieces of wood. Model plane builders use a maple or birch high strength plywood that would be a good choice to make a ring or disc.
    Willie X
     
  7. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    The spool is about as dry as you can get. Avoid green and wax. That's going to be a rather thin section to turn. May need to make it oversized and turn down after glue. Two thin pieces laminated cross-grain would add strength.

    RC
     
  8. Hudson

    Hudson Registered User
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    The suggestions for type of wood, and for laminating thin sections, are well taken. Thanks.
     
  9. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    white beech would be fine and probably close to the original.
    Burkhard
     
  10. Rob P.

    Rob P. Registered User

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    For new spools, either white birch, beech, or hard maple. I'd use hard maple. For new flanges, hard maple.

    For new flanges, I'd turn the spool flanges off until only half the spool diameter remains. Just the flange thickness and radius to the winding surface, don't remove any more of the spool winding surface. Then make new "over thickness" flanges with holes to fit the remaining step and epoxy them in place. Brass or wood dowel pegs 180* apart into the ends of the spool through the flange to help hold. Reduce flanges to final thickness flush with existing end of spool. You can hide the joint line in one of the decorative grooves. Finally, shape the inner side of the flange and radius to match the winding surface of the spool. Sand, polish and admire.
     
  11. Hudson

    Hudson Registered User
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    Thanks to all for your advice on repairing the clock winding arbor spools.
    Here they are after repair. View attachment 327933
    The broken flanges were turned off. New flanges were made from Cherry, then glued and pinned in place. The final sizes were turned after installation.
     

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  12. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Nice going. Glad to see that you could preserve as much of the original as you could. Looks great. And the felt marker graffiti is gone.

    David
     
  13. BLKBEARD

    BLKBEARD Registered User

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    Good for another couple of Centuries. Did you treat the spools with boiled linseed oil or something?
     
  14. Hudson

    Hudson Registered User
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    I used Antiquax Brown Wax. Rubbed it in while the part was still chucked and turning in the lathe.
     
  15. Rob P.

    Rob P. Registered User

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    Nobody's going to complain about that repair.

    You done a GOOD JOB!
     

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