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What kind of forms do you use for your shop repairs

Kenneth Rex Martin

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Nov 3, 2015
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What kind of forms do you use for your repair records?
 

Dick Feldman

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Sep 1, 2000
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Every clock I see is recorded. I use a simple Word file and store that by year, last name alphabetically, and date. That makes finding the file and tracking down the situation very easy.

Any clocks that I see will get a written estimate for repair, which I mail to the owner. Along with that estimate, I send any other pertinent information about the clock, like a brief history of the manufacturer or something specific about the style of the clock (i.e. Kitchen clock, store regulator, advertising clock, etc). If I can find anything in my library about the model, I sent that too. I have found these "extras" to be a great sales tool, especially if the repair amount approaches the value of the clock. Along with the estimate, I send a letter explaining what I plan to do to the clock, when they can expect the repair to be complete, etc. On the estimate form (my file copy) I include anything that may be of use later. For instance, "They have a dog named Spot," or "The clock belonged to Jim's favorite uncle Bill," or I was referred to these people by so-and-so's brother in law," or "Movement purchased from Butterworth, invoice number, date, etc." All of that is stored in my computer under: My documents-->Clock Documents--> Clock Estimates 2016/2015, etc. I name the document Last name, First name, Date. I can retrieve any file by name by searching for that name in Clock Documents. I have three back up systems for all of my files. (Cloud, and two external drives). All backups are updated at least once a day.

I have an invoice form that use when the customer picks up their clock, a standard form for estimates and a letterhead. That is all that I have found to be necessary.

I have sent a copy of the estimate form and letterhead to you via PM Somehow, the formatting and graphics were skewed, but you should get the general idea.

Best Regards,

Dick
 

Kenneth Rex Martin

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Thanks Dick, I am in the process of trying to design a form for better record keeping and a simple way of retrieving it. Your method sounds good.
One more question what is a pm and how do I retrieve it?
 

Dick Feldman

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A PM is a private message. If you go to the very top of this page, there is aline that says "F, Connect, your name and "Messages" with a scroll down arrow. Tap that scroll down arrow for your message/s. The word "Messages" should be highlighted when you have an unread message.

Best,

Dick
 

Kenneth Rex Martin

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Never mind, l got the message. Thanks again, I will adapt it to my needs. It is a very nice design.
 

shutterbug

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I use an X-cell spreadsheet to compute my charges. Then I transfer it to a word document as Dick mentioned. Works well, and if you keep the invoices filed by year there are few duplicates.
 

scott64a

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Jul 31, 2013
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I use a cheap-O two copy invoice pad from Wall-Fart. I bought a stamp with my company's logo on it, and stamp all of the customer copies prior to using the pad.

Saves me a fortune in not having to pay a printing company, and still looks professional.
I give a verbal estimate on site and if they agree to the work, I leave the customer copy with them with the price on there. I always advise that if extra parts or bushing work is necessary, it'll be extra, and write "to call if additional parts of labor are necessary" on the invoice.

I ALWAYS call prior to doing extra work in an effort to be up-front and honest.

After a job is done, I have a carbon copy left in the book for reference in the future, including the date it was worked on, to help sort out the one-year warranty. They don't take up much space, and are stored by year. After a job is done, I write the customer's contact info on a cheap Rolodex card and slap it in the holder.
It's a system.

It doesn't need electricity or storage on a hard drive, and unless I burn the house down, it'll be there when I need it. Not dependent on technology beyond a pen.

I'm a simple kinda guy. :)

"computing charges" means addition or subtraction... I don't need a spreadsheet for that hahaha
 
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