What kind of escapement is this?

R. Croswell

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This E. N. Welch shelf clock is my latest project. Not sure what model it is but the movement, signed E. N. Welch, Pat. Aug. 30 1870, has an escapement that is unlike any I have seen before. Well, there are a lot of things that I have not seen, but I'm hoping that someone else might know what to call it. The teeth of the escape wheel are blunt and angled on the tips. The pallet strip is sharp pointed and shaped like a hald-deadbeat. In operation, it seems to function like a half-deadbeat but the locking and impulse faces are on the escape wheel - like the role of the pallet strip and escape wheel are reversed. After a good cleaning and a few bushings, the movement is running very strong. Anyone know what it is and if anyone else made them. and what advantages or disadvantages it may have.

Thanks,
Bob
 

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leeinv66

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Hi Bob, that's a club foot escapement. Have a look in clock repair, these is a thread about them at the monent.

Cheers
Peter
 

leeinv66

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Guess I had my foot where my tooth should have been:bang:!

Cheers
Peter
 

inbeat

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clocker2 said:
Bob, that's a club tooth or club wheel escapement. I have only seen these on Welch clocks.

http://www.nawcc-mb.com/bbv2/bbBoard.cgi?a=viewthread;fid=14;gtid=218479

Jeff Major
Jeff,
I think you mean Welch movements...Ithaca Calendar clocks often had these club tooth escapements in their upper movements made by Welch.

By the way...great looking escape wheels you are making. I will keep this thread in my favorites so I can come back to it when I need one made.

JJ
 

Scottie-TX

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I guess then, that the pallet lands on the dead face of the tooth, slides, and impulse occurs as tooth pushes pallet on the tooth's impulse face?
 

clocker2

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Actually, the corner of the square tooth lands on the pallet, then as the pallet slides off the tooth, the bevel impulses it. Just as in the deadbeat escapement, the dropping action does not land on the bevel.

Jeff Major
 
J

Jim D.

Bob,

Your clock is called an Empress. Made by Welch, Spring 1868 to 1864 and then by E N Welch 1885 to 1888. E N Welch made the movement for Welch, Spring so without a lable it will be hard to say which company made it. This type of escapement was only made by them as far as I can tell, but there are a few different movements that use the club foot escapement.These include 30 hour and 8 day movements. It was used in the Empress, Italian models, Patti models and Ithica calander clocks that I know of. Your movement appears to be the 8 day movement.

There is also a photo of your clock and escapement in this post. Check this page and the next one.

http://www.nawcc-mb.com/bbv2/bbBoard.cgi?a=viewthread;fid=1;gtid=57692;pagenumber=27

Jim D.

R. said:
This E. N. Welch shelf clock is my latest project. Not sure what model it is but the movement, signed E. N. Welch, Pat. Aug. 30 1870,

Thanks,
Bob

 

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