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What is it?

intergalactron

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Trying to figure out what this movement is. Dial is marked “M. Timpane, Troy NY”. Serial number is 564285. Dial is 1.800”, lever set… No case. I have it partially disassembled, but I don’t have a jewel count yet, as I am waiting for a pin vice to get the cannon pinion off. 236FEF85-E371-486F-AF4F-00E4F70CABF5.jpeg EDBB941A-EE0F-40E9-A528-DF23D697B88D.jpeg
 
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musicguy

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It looks like a Swiss Private Label from a Jeweler in Troy NY
I believe I may have a PL from this Jeweler.


Rob
 
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musicguy

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gmorse

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Hi intergalactron,
I can’t get it to budge with a lever.
The centre arbor on these is usually hollow with a pin passing through it, and the cannon pinion is a pretty tight fit on the pin. The action to allow hand setting is achieved by the pin being able to turn in the hollow centre arbor, although still with enough friction to drive the motion work. Tapping the pin out from the dial side is the safest way to do it; if you try and lever the cannon pinion off, especially using only one lever, you risk bending or breaking the pin.

Regards,

Graham
 

intergalactron

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Excellent call on tapping that shaft out. The pin vice didn't work. It might have, but I was scared to tighten it too much.
 
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intergalactron

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I can find no other markings on this movement, other than the sn and M.Timpane. So... back to the original question. What is it? And where can I get parts for it?
 

John Cote

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I'm not sure anybody is going to be able to tell you exactly who made this movement. The usual way these came into the US from Switzerland was through a distributor, usually in NYC who had the contacts in Geneva and imported lots of movements. These movements were put together from parts made in the cottage industry of Swiss watchmaking. Sometimes we can know who the finisher of the better movements was. Your movement is, unfortunately not one of the better imports. It is sort of generic. Usually, the only way to find parts is to buy a donor movement which has the same plate layout. I seriously doubt that any parts house is going to have drawers full of parts...or even know where the drawers would be if they did. Look for a similar movement. Perhaps between the two you will be able to assemble a working watch.
 
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intergalactron

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I was afraid of that. Even if I can’t get it to a running state, it’s already served the purpose of being something to practice on.
 
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John Cote

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I was afraid of that. Even if I can’t get it to a running state, it’s already served the purpose of being something to practice on.
That's the spirit. If you save this movement, perhaps not as a project to bring back to working but as a learning experience, you will someday stumble upon an almost working and originally cased example which will need a part from this movement. The only trouble with this philosophy is that you could end up like a lot of us with boxes full of old movements and other junk. Nerd-dom is a dangerous thing.
 

roughbarked

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I had never thought that I was a nerd but put that way, maybe we all are?
I'm very sure that many members of this board have not only done a lot of research but also have access to better reference material than I have. From my humble viewpoint, this was not the cheapest of watches available to American importers even though it was not actually finished by a well known name, it was a base model of better grade than many at the time. You could almost call it as what we see today of Chinese copies of better known brands.
 
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musicguy

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I think the difference is, a nerd does not know they are a nerd. If
you think you are a nerd your not(just kidding) :) ;) .



Rob
 
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musicguy

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After all this talk I am going to move this watch to the European
section. Someone did ask why it was still here(it is an American PL
thats why I left it) Moving it now for better identification.

Rob
 

mosesgodfrey

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Following Rick's lead, I'll suggest Longines/Francillon & Cie. Serial number fits, and a preferred private label maker for many folks. Some similarities to the "Caliber B or L" movement on the left of this 1883 ad--click mechanism, balance cock & hairspring stud carrier shapes, F/S adjustment marks, etc. Yours could be its 1890 cousin? Grasping a bit here, but I do see a few Longines from this period out there that are even closer to yours.

1883 longines B L calibers.JPG
 
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MrRoundel

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Just out of curiosity, what does the barrel-bridge look like? The discoloration of the damasceening on the plate show that there was a barrel-bridge covering the winding (ratchet) wheel not long ago. BTW, my first guess would be a Longines product. I base this mostly on the rough plate design, as well as the type of damasceening. Cheers.
 

intergalactron

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Just out of curiosity, what does the barrel-bridge look like? The discoloration of the damasceening on the plate show that there was a barrel-bridge covering the winding (ratchet) wheel not long ago. BTW, my first guess would be a Longines product. I base this mostly on the rough plate design, as well as the type of damasceening. Cheers.
 

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MrRoundel

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So, intergalactron, do you actually have that plate that covers the ratchet wheel? Do you see the plate that's partially covering the wheel in mosesgodfrey's last post? I'm just wondering if the movement is incomplete. Cheers.
 

Dr. Jon

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The example is what I call a Barrel Plate. A barrel bridge to me is pivot support that is secured on both sides of the pivot and exposes the barrel on both sides.

Here is a pure example:

Fullmovement2.png

To me it is also a barrel bridge if it covers the drive wheel (the one with the pivot at the center of "Adjusted").
 

intergalactron

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So, intergalactron, do you actually have that plate that covers the ratchet wheel? Do you see the plate that's partially covering the wheel in mosesgodfrey's last post? I'm just wondering if the movement is incomplete. Cheers.
This is all I got. I think it is complete except for stem and case.

IMG_3056.jpg IMG_3057.jpg
 

MrRoundel

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Good. Thanks for including the new images that show the plate I was inquiring about. That said, it's a bit odd that the damasceening of that plate doesn't follow the rest of the plate decoration. But that is truly just aesthetics. Since it's marked with the same name as shows on the dial, it's almost certainly all original. Enjoy the project.
 

intergalactron

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Looking back, I failed to mention that the seller on eBay claimed this was a Longines. After receiving it, I kinda arrived at the conclusion that it wasn’t. But maybe it is.
 

Rick Hufnagel

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It sure looks remarkably similar to my Longines posted in another thread. Here are the two side by side and I believe there are enough similarities to reasonably think that the movement here is Longines. Other than it's general look and the similar dial, the under dial photos show some similarities. Obviously the click is different since the OPs watch has the ratchet wheel on the top plate, and was obviously a better movement. The serial number is right in line as well.

20220207_082324-COLLAGE.jpg 20220207_081732-COLLAGE.jpg

After you get it back together, intergalactron, go to Longines website and ask them to look it up in their archives. It's a great free service they offer. They will need nice clear photos of the movement. Both sides including the underdial, and the dial. Of course, I found out the hard way that if the movement came from their Ebauche department, instead of regular production, Longines will not have records for it.
 

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