What is it? - a DUFA?

f.webster

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Over the holiday two clocks landed up on my workbench. I will address them on seperate threads.

The first: I am looking for some answers about this wall clock. The key says "DUFA" and I know that is little or no help in identifying the clock. The trademake (picture) is not a familiar one to me.

I know it needs a good cleaning and a new suspension spring; but, I don't know much else about it. Made, model, age, etc.

I get by with a little help from my friends...thanks

Frank 79602.jpg 79603.jpg 79604.jpg
 

zepernick

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Greetings Frank --

The mark belonged to the Schwäbische Uhren- und Apparatefabrik AG, in Sindelfingen. Extremely little is know about the firm, that is, whether they were actually a factory or wholesalers or what. They're not in the 1925 clockmakers' addressbuch, for example (not even listed as being in Sindelfingen). But they are listed in a Deutsche Uhrmacher-Zeitung in 1926 among the firms which are involved in bankruptcy proceedings.

Regards
Zep
 

MQ32shooter

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I've got a Dufa clock somewhere in the house. I'll check tonight. I think it's a GF clock. If I remember correctly, the movement has an "elephant" stamped onto the movement. 79613.jpg
 

f.webster

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zepernick;517572 said:
The mark belonged to the Schwäbische Uhren- und Apparatefabrik AG, in Sindelfingen. Extremely little is know about the firm, that is, whether they were actually a factory or wholesalers or what. They're not in the 1925 clockmakers' addressbuch, for example (not even listed as being in Sindelfingen). But they are listed in a Deutsche Uhrmacher-Zeitung in 1926 among the firms which are involved in bankruptcy proceedings.

Regards
Zep
Thanks for the input Zep.

From your reply, this is a German Company, likely a wholesaler (not in clockmakers' addressbuch in 1925) and the clock appeared before 1926. Did I get that translation right?
 

zepernick

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Hello again Frank --

Well, hm, not exactly. :)

The standard reference to the German clock industry, Schmid's (2005) Lexikon der Deutschen Uhrenindustrie 1850-1950 simply notes the name of the firm, that it was located in Sindelfingen (in what was Württemberg), that it was around around 1920, evidently had a short existence, and that what they made is not known.

The problem with a name that has "Uhrenfabrik" in it is that some firms used it that didn't actually manufacture clocks. They might have, for instance, put others' movements into their own cases, or combined others' movements and others' cases. Or were wholesalers, or wholesalers as well.

The reference I checked, the Uhrmacher Adressbuch for 1925, was the largest source for any firm and suppliers and individual clockmakers. It's 462 pages long. That the firm was not listed as being in Sindelfingen (regardless of what it was) would seem to indicate that they were no longer in business. The 1926 reference I found -- they were in bankruptcy -- would seem to support this.

But we don't know enough about them to say anything more than what was in Schmid.

Regards
Zep
 
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chimeclockfan

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MQ32shooter;517576 said:
I've got a Dufa clock somewhere in the house. I'll check tonight. I think it's a GF clock. If I remember correctly, the movement has an "elephant" stamped onto the movement.
DUFA's logo wasn't an elephant. It was a war memorial in Leipzig.
 

f.webster

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Zep,

Thanks for the clerification. It is clocks like this that make me thankful for the labels used by american manufacturers.

The works have turned out to be a little tricky. To get the strike spring barrel out during the breakdown for cleaning, I had to pull everything off of the front plate. Then pull the count wheel off the end of an arbor to free the first gear in the strike train. Only ten could the spring barrel be removed.

Along with that, the suspension spring is missing and the pendulum leader is not original. Creative but definately not original...

but it will run before I am done,

Frank
 

soaringjoy

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Somehow I don't think the movement itself was delivered
by DUFA (Deutsche Uhrenfabrik Etzold & Popitz, Leipzig).
All DUFA movements of the 1920s I've seen (say dozens) had
a rack and snail strike, even the ones with a single hammer.
Jurgen
 

Albra

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Greetings Frank,

congrats, your clock is very rare! I have never seen a SUA-clock before!

As Zep mentioned the "Schwäbische Uhren und Apparatefabrik" existed for a very short time in the mid-twenties. There are relationsships between SUA and Mauthe, which were not really clearified until today.

But the movement of your clock is a Mauthe, that´s for shure.

Best regards!


albra
 

f.webster

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Soaringjoy,

The only link I have to Dufa is the key. I know that isn't really a link at all. These works have a count wheel not a rack and snail. The trademark identification is about all I have to go on.


Albra,

Thanks for the support on the identification. Mauthe...Hummm. Figuring this out has been fun to say the least.

Today the face is a paper face that looks like it is covering ...something else. There is a ogee king of curve to the surface. If it was originally a paper face, I think it would have been flat.

Any thoughts from those of you who have seen these clocks before?
 

soaringjoy

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Let's say, your box clock should have a silvered, or brass colored
dial - 99,9%
The style of numbers and index is a standard type, used by
several manufacturers before and after WW I, but I haven't seen
a paper dial on a clock like yours yet.
Of course the makers used many kinds of paper / celluloid paper
dials and some indeed had an Ogee type moulding, but these
disappeared much earlier.

So if your dial is original, it should at least have a protective laquer
coating of some kind. The paper or cardboard itself would be a kind
of laminate, made of several layers, that you can see at the edges
of the holes.

As saying, German clocks of the period usually had silvered dials
(exceptions were of course the ones made of enamel, which were white)
and these mostly appeared on Vienna type wall clocks or on some
mantle clocks.

BTW: If the dial looks good and you like it, then I wouldn't think about
taking it apart - they really weren't made for that and you'll probably
get in some kind of trouble what so ever, while reassembling, at the
latest.

Jurgen
 

f.webster

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Jurgen

This face looks to be a paper replacement that is covering the original. I will see what it looks like when it all comes apart (oops).

Tanks for the help

Frank
 

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