What is good for rinsing clock movement parts?

BCR

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May 3, 2020
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After ultrasonically cleaning and then water-rinsing and drying parts with compressed air, I have used a variety of rinsing solutions over the years. Has anyone found that something as simple as mineral spirits does just as well as the $50 a gallon solutions from clock supply houses? I'm just looking for suggestions, thanks very much.
 

glenhead

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I clean, then rinse in hot water, then drop in a bowl of denatured alcohol, then either use an air compressor or hair dryer to blow off the alcohol. The only purpose for the alcohol-rinse step is to completely absorb the water into a medium that the moving air will evaporate more quickly. If you're already drying the parts after the water rinse, another rinse isn't really accomplishing anything.

Glen
 
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BCR

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Thanks for your opinion, but it seems that a water rinse, even after compressed air drying, can leave some moisture in some parts. The solvent rinse would be to remove any leftover water hiding anywhere, that's all I'm saying. I'll just go with the mineral spirits for now and see how that goes. Way less expensive than the stuff from clock supply houses.
 

R. Croswell

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After ultrasonically cleaning and then water-rinsing and drying parts with compressed air, I have used a variety of rinsing solutions over the years. Has anyone found that something as simple as mineral spirits does just as well as the $50 a gallon solutions from clock supply houses? I'm just looking for suggestions, thanks very much.
Depends on what you used as cleaner. I use Polychem 007. It calls for rinsing with water. I rinse with water, blow with compressed air, into 180 degree oven with air flow. Dry until too hot top touch and done. I've tried a few final rinse solutions but didn't see where any of them actually improved anything. If the cleaner being used is one that rinses with water getting rid of the water as quickly as possible is the goal.

RC
 

MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

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A good commercial clock solution whether for cleaning or rinsing is made specifically for that purpose. Even if price is the only consideration, does anyone actually calculate how much per clocks top grade product actually costs? A couple of dollars at most.
 

Willie X

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Any high fraction petroleum product will help remove the 'hidden' water. I used CLF (Coleman lantern fuel) for many years but switched to paint thinner, or K-1 Kerosene, or mineral spirits, mainly because of the lower flash point.

I never liked using alcohol because you can't tell how much water is in it. With the above listed products the water is forced out and drops to the bottom of the bowl.

When using the usual US clean and warm water rinse, followed with compressed air, I've never done a final petroleum rinse that didn't have at least a few drops of water at the bottom of the rinse container. Also, actually seeing the water, makes it easy to recycle your rinse. Just pour it through a #6 coffee filter and cast out the last tablespoon or so. You will see the water as you get close to the end of your decantation.

Rinse on,. Willie X
 

JimmyOz

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Thanks for your opinion, but it seems that a water rinse, even after compressed air drying
Not a fan of compressed air as it carries moisture, I normally use a hair dryer, however a few weeks ago I was doing a GF clock and the hair dryer stopped working, so I thought, what now everything is wet, I went to the kitchen and used my air fryer at about 100c having the parts in a ceramic flan dish, worked great, just make sure you do not have oily food residue in the bottom. These air fryers are not expensive so I might just buy one and put it in my workshop.
 

JeffG

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Why use water at all?
What I've been doing (and I'm just getting started) is using either an ammonia/oleic acid compound or DEOX-007 in an US cleaner, then blowing the drips with an air nozzle before dropping parts into a 1st bucket of 99% isopropyl alcohol followed by another blow and a second bucket of cleaner 99% iso' alcohol.
I live in a salty humid environment and don't want any water touching my parts if I can help it.
WillieX may have just steered me away from alcohol in favor of hydrophobic solvents, though.
 

Willie X

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Well removing 100% of the water might be possible. But, in a few days you will again be at the mercy of the local conditions.

I've never seen any problems associated with compressed air but I'm sure this to varies from place to place also.

Kerosene - The mother's milk of clock repair.

Compressed air - The breath of life.

Me and Harold used to joke about these little idioms. Willie X
 
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kinsler33

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I've been water-rinsing and then spraying everything with the cheapest imitation WD-40 that I can find. The idea was to avoid having open buckets of flammable liquids sitting around, but I think I may try dipping after rinsing in a substantial container of either paint thinner or charcoal lighter fluid.

Mark Kinsler
 

Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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WD40 doesn't evaporate - beware! Apart from that, if I wash brass parts in Horolene and they turn bright blue, I know someone has had WD40 on them :mad:
 

shutterbug

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I have always used Isopropyl alcohol 99% and it does a great job of eliminating water. It does lose some effectiveness after absorbing a lot of water, but you can see pretty quickly how fast it is drying and start again. A pint will treat a whole movement, and can be reused several times.
 
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