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What exactly are these for?

comet61

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Aug 7, 2021
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Hey folks...first ever post here. I am working on a New Haven Tambour #56 Mantle clock (circa 1929) with a typical New Haven movement. This is basically the first WH movement I've worked on and was curious as to what these are. See pics. They seem to help in restricting movement of the pivots within the bushings. On the time side, the 3rd wheel has one on the front side and the 4th wheel as them on both sides. Is this a factory design or perhaps a clock repair? Just wondering as I have not seen these on other type movements that I've worked on. I consider myself still a novice as I am recently retired and am doing clock repair/restoration as a hobby. I find clock work fascinating.

I have Steven G. Conover Striking Clock Repair Guide page 10 and he has a section on the New Haven movement I am working on. It is identical to the one I am working on but these "items" are not present on the movement plates. Thank you for any insight.

WH_01.jpg WH_02.jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

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They appear to be a type of "home-grown bushing," put on by someone who did not want or know how to properly re-bush the pivots affected.

If I am correct, get thee to a clockery and have the movement overhauled properly.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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These type repairs are all to common.

Someone didn't know how to disassemble the clock and make a good repair. They just shim the pivot over a bit and make the ole baby go again for a while.

This could have been long long ago or recently but it should be made right when you take the clock apart. Look up, 'rebushing worn pivot holes' and 'removing solder'.

Welcome to the MB, Willie X
 
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comet61

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Aug 7, 2021
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These type repairs are all to common.

Someone didn't know how to disassemble the clock and make a good repair. They just shim the pivot over a bit and make the ole baby go again for a while.

This could have been long long ago or recently but it should be made right when you take the clock apart. Look up, 'rebushing worn pivot holes' and 'removing solder'.

Welcome to the MB, Willie X
Yes...I believe this clock was repaired a very long time ago. There are 4 inscribed dates of repair on the both plates dates are: 1932, 1945, 1947 and 1950. Nothing after that. This clock sat inert for at least 60+ years. The strike train still could work if wound. The time train was frozen solid. It's a nice project to work on.
 

JimmyOz

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I think if I new nothing about clocks and had to pay for it to be repaired in 1945 then 47 and again in 50 I would most likely give up as well and set it aside.
 

comet61

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Aug 7, 2021
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I think if I new nothing about clocks and had to pay for it to be repaired in 1945 then 47 and again in 50 I would most likely give up as well and set it aside.
Yeah, I see what you mean. The dates could very well be when they were brought in for tune ups/maintenance. Initials of the dates are the same except the one for 1950. The movement is actually in fair condition.
 

shutterbug

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I suspect the 1950 date is the origin of the makeshift "bushing".
 

Kevin W.

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At least this repair kept it going a short while and prevented it from being trashed, i still see people posting that they punch holes closed and seem proud of thir repair jobs.
 
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Willie X

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I've seen many clocks where several of the temporary repairs were not even necessary. Just clean that pivot up, remove the solder and that particular area is good to go. Willie X
 

comet61

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Aug 7, 2021
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At least this repair kept it going a short while and prevented it from being trashed, i still see people posting that they punch holes closed and seem proud of thir repair jobs.
Oh. You mean like this? Sad.

WH_holes.jpg
 

Bruce Alexander

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Welcome Comet

This movement has been punched up pretty good before the home-made Rathbun-type repair was done some time ago. I think that punching was a commonly accepted practice back then so it's generally a good idea to put things in context when dealing with antiques. You, of course, will use commonly accepted current practices in servicing your clock.

Along those same lines, unlike Synthetics, Natural lubricants didn't last that long so you may be right. The frequent servicing may have been for inspection and fresh oil. Who knows? Does the "writing" look like it was done by the same hand?

Regards,

Bruce
 

comet61

Registered User
Aug 7, 2021
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Welcome Comet

This movement has been punched up pretty good before the home-made Rathbun-type repair was done some time ago. I think that punching was a commonly accepted practice back then so it's generally a good idea to put things in context when dealing with antiques. You, of course, will use commonly accepted current practices in servicing your clock.

Along those same lines, unlike Synthetics, Natural lubricants didn't last that long so you may be right. The frequent servicing may have been for inspection and fresh oil. Who knows? Does the "writing" look like it was done by the same hand?

Regards,

Bruce
All dates have the same scribe initials of "PF then the date, except the the one from 1950 which has different initials and the date format is different. After that there are no records with the clock. The antique dealer bought this at an estate sale a few years ago as is. The seller told the dealer that it had been in an attic since the late 50's, early 60's after the owners house caught fire. The estate also sold a Junghas Mantle clock (bim bam chime) circa 1954 that I also acquired.
 

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