What Does This Thing Do??

bangster

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There's something here that I badly need explained to me. Namely, the function and purpose of the lever labeled (A) in the picture.

178.jpg

The oval hole slides along its pivoting screw, so the lever can be extended to the right. Near the right end, foreshortened in the picture, is a pin sticking out at right angles that will extend thru the dial.

When the righthand end is pressed down, it raises lever (B) which in turn raises lever (D). Leveer (D) is what Conover calls the "release piece". Its lefthand end rides on the center shaft cam. When the cam raises it, the release piece raises the chime flirt unlocking the chime train, which in turn raises the strike flirt unlocking the strike train, and so on. Then, in due course, the chime train runs and (on the hour) the strike train runs.

As I see it, raising the release piece with levers A-B should initiate the same sequence as raising it with the cam. But as far as I can see, it doesn't do anything of the sort. There are several possibilities. One is that the action is delayed, and I should wait around 15 minute or so after depressing lever (A) to observe its effects. Another is that something sneaky is broken. Another is that I don't know what the hell I'm talking about. Help??

And by the way: that little broken helical spring labelled (C). What is its other end supposed to connect to? An obvious answer would be: hook it to the hole in the end of lever (A). But then the spring will be holding down the end of lever (D, preventing it from falling off the cam properly. Help??

bangster
 

bangster

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There's something here that I badly need explained to me. Namely, the function and purpose of the lever labeled (A) in the picture.

178.jpg

The oval hole slides along its pivoting screw, so the lever can be extended to the right. Near the right end, foreshortened in the picture, is a pin sticking out at right angles that will extend thru the dial.

When the righthand end is pressed down, it raises lever (B) which in turn raises lever (D). Leveer (D) is what Conover calls the "release piece". Its lefthand end rides on the center shaft cam. When the cam raises it, the release piece raises the chime flirt unlocking the chime train, which in turn raises the strike flirt unlocking the strike train, and so on. Then, in due course, the chime train runs and (on the hour) the strike train runs.

As I see it, raising the release piece with levers A-B should initiate the same sequence as raising it with the cam. But as far as I can see, it doesn't do anything of the sort. There are several possibilities. One is that the action is delayed, and I should wait around 15 minute or so after depressing lever (A) to observe its effects. Another is that something sneaky is broken. Another is that I don't know what the hell I'm talking about. Help??

And by the way: that little broken helical spring labelled (C). What is its other end supposed to connect to? An obvious answer would be: hook it to the hole in the end of lever (A). But then the spring will be holding down the end of lever (D, preventing it from falling off the cam properly. Help??

bangster
 

Chris

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First question; are there any markings on the dial saying strike and silent? I would assume it's a shutoff for chime only (you have the same setup on the strike train above.)

I would think that the spring hooks to the top post of the movement to provide downward tension on the arm. Who is the maker and what did it come out of? From the hands, I'd say 1930's and German; did I get it right?

Have a good night, Chris
 

bangster

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Not German, but English...its the Anvil clock I asked about in the Clocks forum. Right time period though.I don't have the dial; just pictures, and not clear enough to read what's on the dial there.

If it's a shutoff, how does it work? By preventing the release-piece (D) from falling off the center cam? But what does the sliding oval-hole business have to do with that?

bangster
 

SSWood

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Bangster, the pin on the end of the lever extends through the dial, and is the "Chime - Silent" control. The extended oval hole means that the same movement will fit dials of differing diameters.

Steve
 

Mike Phelan

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Steve is spot-on. Most Napoleons - German or English, are the same, to accommodate different dials. With double and triple chimes, the lever is on the left, and the tune change on the right.
The chime-silent lever just pushes up the chime warning piece so the chime is permanently locked in warning.
Have you a pic of the RH side of the movement? - my forgettory about the spring is rusty.
 

bangster

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Here's pic. Not as sharp as one would like, but (I think) good 'nuf to reveal no obvious place for mr. spring to hook up.
179.jpg
180.jpg

FWIW, it's been running on a test stand for about 15 hours now, with spring dangling and no observed problems. Maybe spring doesn't do anything...just a decoration. :biggrin: :confused:

ADDENDUM: Unless...could it maybe hook onto the notch in the lever just above it...partially hidden by the hand:???:

bangster
 

Chris

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It's possible that a previous repairman had a problem with that lever not dropping and added it to ensure it fell completely. He may have tightened the screw collar on the inside of the plate that holds the arm in place too close to the plate, causing it to stick.

There doesn't seem to be a specific spot for it to attach. The end of the arm reminds me of Hermle movements which also have no springs on them (and are secured by the same type of screw collar).

If it works flawlessly, I would just remove it. What are you doing with the movement? Is it going into a different case? What kind of dial are you going to use?
 

bangster

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It belongs to my sister-in-law, who shipped me the movement without the case. After its ills are healed (whatever they are --haven't found any yet), it will go back into its original art deco case.

bangster
 
C

Christopher Isaac

That's so you can adjust the length of the silent lever for a small or large dial. The spring does not serve a purpose. There is no need for it, where the spring is, if you pull that lever the clock should strike, there is no need for setting it because this clock is a rack clock and not a countwheel clock. No problems there. I think the top lever is for changing the chime tune, probably whittington & westminster. If I'm wrong I'm sorry.
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff