What do you guys use a Dremmel for?

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by ChrisCam, Mar 10, 2019.

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  1. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Dec 9, 2017
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    Hi, I have noted many posters have referred to using a Dremmel for clock repair so I thought I would ask you what you have used one for and what attachments are worth getting?
    Regards
    Chris
     
  2. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
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    The cut off wheels are nice and a good assortment of burrs are very handy for shaping and cutting metal.
     
  3. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Kevin
    Chris
     
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  4. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Dec 18, 2011
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    Hi Chris,

    First, if you don't mind I will refer to these types of tools as "rotary tools", since mine are all Black & Decker Wizards, Foredom also makes rotary tools as do other house brands. And in full disclosure, I worked for Black & Decker on this tool and that is why I have so many . Dremel was a bad name at B&D :), they wanted to displace Dremel ha ha, that didn't happen.

    I have one mounted in a QCTP tool holder that I use with the lathe as a small tool post grinder., One is mounted on my bench in a holder with a fiberglass cutoff wheel as a quick and dirty bench grinder, then one with a flex shaft and finally a cordless one for quick stuff on the bench.

    There are a couple of very useful cut off wheels. One is very thin and solid abrasive and makes a fairly narrow kerf, but is very fragile, safety glasses are a must with all rotary accessories, but this one especially. The other type of cut off wheel has a fibre reinforcement which makes it almost indestructible, but makes a wider kerf.

    The flex shaft version is usually loaded with a dental burr for fine work. The flex shaft gives me better control. I had a Hermle movement that had a ratio wheel with a broken slot set screw that I could not pull off or move the screw due to part of the slot missing. I was able to route it out with a carbide dental burr and save the part.

    I am posting pics of some of the accessories I use. Not shown are the polishing discs that Mark Butterworth sells for rotary tools. I use the pink ones the most.

    Tool post grinder
    Cutting a pin.jpg Cordless and flex shaft Cordless and flex shaft.jpg bench bench mounted wizard.jpg

    Some accessories
    wizard accessories 1.jpg

    All the best

    David
     
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  5. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
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    Great posting David, very informative.
     
  6. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    My uses are more modest. I have just one Dremel, with flex shaft attached, that's always by my bench. I use it for grinding, polishing, and cutting. I use it either hand-held, or clamped in the bench vise. The flex shaft is indispensable. It makes work easy, whereas maneuvering the heavy machine by itself is clumsy and not much fun. I have two different collets, to accomodate two different size bit shanks. I have the usual collection of grinding stones, and grinders that use the sandpaper cylinders. I have cloth and felt buffing wheels that I use with polishing compound. I have a large supply of cutting wheels, the brittle kind that David mentions. I have diamond wheels, and diamond grinding bits of various shapes, for shaping things. I have wire brushes, brass and steel. I have a set of Butterworth's pivot polishing wheels, but I seldom use them any more I have drill bits, but I never use them since I don't like the Dremel for drilling. I used to have one of those drill press attachments, but I got rid of it since it was clumsy to use. I have the right-angle attachment that came with it. That's pretty much what I have.
    Dremel.jpg bits.jpg
     
  7. mauleg

    mauleg Registered User
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    The wire wheels are great for removing rust and corrosion from tight spots. The sandpaper drum actually does a better job at grinding on small work than the stones.
     
  8. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    I have two Dremels and a WeCheer all with a cable drive set up over the top of my bench on a 3/4" length of electrical conduit. They can be moved acrosse the bench to where ever I need them. Most often one Dremel has a wire brush and the other has a felt polishing wheel. The WeCheer is a heavy duty cable drive with a cutoff wheel. I use them constantly for cleaning, polishing, drilling, cutting and in the case of the WeCheer not only does it do the heavy duty cutoff work but a change in handles it can do wood power carving.

    0-8.jpeg
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    Foredoms pick up where Dremels leave off. I have 3 Dremells but only use the newest rechargeable one, very handy to not be restricted with a cord. I am constantly using an old Foredom (1/10 HP) and a newer 1/4 HP with foward and reverse.

    Dremels have to be run at high speed to do much work. Foredoms can be used at any speed with good torque at low speeds. This is very important running larger brushes, sanding drums, drills, cut-off disk, etc. The reverse feature can be a big help at times. Willie X
     
  10. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks David and everyone that has posted great stuff. I take it you can still buy the dremel stands so you can attach the flexi shaft and work with both hands. The Butterworth wheels must be worth a punt as they have good reviews.
    Regards
    Chris
     
  11. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    I have one as well and use it for most of what others describe. Get Dremmel with adjustable speeds, not the one-speed ones.

    Ron
     
  12. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Ron
    Chris
     
  13. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Yes +1 on the sandpaper drums. They do a nice job on finishing brass parts like a click or something like that. The very small diameter drum can get into tight curves. And they don't load up like a stone does. They come in various grits as well.

    And I should have mentioned that all my rotary tools are variable speed, except the cordless one which is two speed.

    David
     
  14. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks David will get these accessories.
    regards
    Chris
     
  15. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    What Ron and Chris said about the speed, I wouldn't even consider anything that wasn't variable speed. A foot pedal is a must for heavy bench useage.
    Willie X
     
  16. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Willie I think you mean a foot pedal that controls the speed on fixed speed versions or do you?
    Chris
     
  17. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    Another option for speed control. I used the foot peddel for a while but I always had trouble finding it under the desk with my foot and then I had trouble maintaining a consistent speed. I gave up on it and got a variable speed controller that is used on routers. It’s in easy reach to adjust the speed I need.
     
  18. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Joseph, will keep that in mind.
    Chris
     
  19. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    I've just recently starting using these on a limited basis. In my hands, I've found them good for Great Wheel Arbors, perhaps 2nd Wheels too if they are relatively large with pivots > 1.5mm. I like using the coarsest wheel in cases where there has been excessive scoring or wear. In this way I think the coarsest wheel is like a pivot file. For finer work, and even the larger 2nd wheel pivots, I still use stones, Simichrome and burnishers to finish up with. The Dremel or other Rotary Instrument is very useful where fine rotary work is required. Another use is glass tablet engraving with diamond bits. Not original but quite indelible and distinctive when the original glass or pattern has been lost. Time consuming though. One can do very fine work with these types of tools.

    Engraved Glass.JPG Engraved_Glass.JPG
     
  20. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

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    I still have the larger, older corded models up to and including a ZipTool.
    But, I find the convenience of the rechargeable, variable speed, models much better.
    One wheel I didn't see mentioned is the Scotchbrite polisher.
    Used with some restraint (and being sure they're spinning in the safe direction so as not to send parts flying across the room), they can quickly clean-up all kinds of verdigris and put a nice finish on parts.
    They come in many different grits. The Chinese 20 piece i inch wheel assortments come with 80 to 300 grit for just a couple of bucks.
     
  21. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Guys, all very useful comments on pivots, engraving and polishing.
    Chris
     
  22. Lordhelpus

    Lordhelpus New Member

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    Dremmel workstation excellent

    Dremel_Work_Station_Rotary_Attachments_22001_(EN)(4).jpg
     
  23. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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