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What are YOU wearing today? Please share!

John Arrowood

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Some dial and hands combinations on very nice watches are just too difficult to see the hand positions and the older I get the worse it gets. I now understand why my Dad liked his Accutron railroad approved watches. I just ignore the calendar; it's just too tiny to see and readers/bifocals don't help that much.
 

pmwas

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No, it’s just that firstly - I don’t like painted hands, and secondly - I think they were intended to match the black Ingersoll logo, while IMO they should match the silver numerals.
Also, the hands are too short, but getting long lumed hands for 9015 is impossible anyway...

And worst of all - the thick second hand with this large arrow. Not any classy at all - in fact, maybe it’s just this second hand that spoils it all :)
 

Rick Hufnagel

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Another project done a couple years ago. My work watch stopped on me, so this one is filling in untill the other is repaired.

This is an Elgin marked Ut-6498, a bit nicer finish on this one that my others.
IMG_20200818_191720461.jpg

I learned about the range of dial sizes used on these movements... The hard way... as you can see in this next pic. Dial is a wee small, but it works and matches what what trying to be accomplished.
IMG_20200818_191630341.jpg



I saw this case for sale and thought it would make the perfect clone of one of my favorite early Elgin wristwatches. I always think there a bit too small for me at 30-32 MMS, and this watch is actually a bit too big at 45mm... But its not uncomfortable.

I waited for an Elgin marked movement with the perfect dial, and I think it came out pretty well. It doesn't get much use, so being that it's water resistant and shock protected... I figured now would be a good opportunity to give it some wrist time.

Here are the two side by side. An 0 size 15 jewel Elgin in white gf case, and my project watch in its stainless case. I actually do have a real early Elgin with a very similar dial to the 6498, but it's put away at the moment.

IMG_20200818_191839643.jpg

It was a fun project and since I wear a converted 6498, or an st3600 to work during the summer, figured it would be fun to share this one today with the others shown recently.
 

Tom McIntyre

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This is my oldest and newest watch.

The movement was made by A.P. Walsh of London around 1880 or a bit earlier, He mostly made very high grade pocket chronometers. The movement had belonged to Brad Ross who was a good friend who died a few years ago. He had bought the movement to be cased as a wristwatch because he had a good collection of other A.P. Walsh chronometers and high end lever pocket watches.

The case was made for me by a fine craftsman Hermann Lutke (sorry for the missing umlaut) who wanted it to honor the style of case from the period of the movement. The case is sterling silver with gold trim. The front and back covers are jointed and there is a protective glass over the movement when the back cover is open. Hermann's maker mark is on the case along with the sterling grade number.

D8CB4E40-A70C-4235-AA1D-7FB09A1649E9.jpeg 4A6D6ABB-98A2-42FE-A876-0B21B84EA72D.jpeg 8117EF23-40ED-4D62-A157-D89277E45822.jpeg 86DC06AB-C20E-4C09-B633-A0762680DE8F.jpeg 2FCB5DC9-8E1D-42EB-8D9E-7A62CD3EA2AC.jpeg 7593DCAE-952B-4616-960D-F12C47B2D019.jpeg 915CADB9-36B6-451B-A90A-F523C74B5EF7.jpeg
 
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pmwas

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Atfedya?

Is that a manufacturer's name or a model name?

Good looking watch by the way. 31 jewels should be plenty!
That’s Amfibia (proper English name for the line ‚Amphibian’). Line made by Vostok (Russia) since 1960s.

The jewel count includes 10 ruby rollers in the reversers, that’s why there are so many.
 

viclip

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That’s Amfibia (proper English name for the line ‚Amphibian’). Line made by Vostok (Russia) since 1960s.

The jewel count includes 10 ruby rollers in the reversers, that’s why there are so many.
Yes now I see ~ jumping between printed/cursive Cyrillic has always been a challenge for me.

I take it that the "Amphibian" line represents diving-type watches. Interesting name.
 

Peter John

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Following photos may not be suitable for all eyes! I have had this Sears movement for 45+ years. No case. I have had the case for 5+ years. Originally had a manual wind calendar movement in it. Rated 600 ft diver. The two did not fit each other. The Sears movement diameter was too wide. Also the rotor sat up too high to screw the back fully down. I used my lathe, opened the diameter to fit and lo and behold the stem lined up perfectly. Then I cut the hole in the back but the rotor was still a scoosh too high yet for a flat glass. I got a convex glass from Borel and it gives sufficient clearance to wind the movement. Finally, I can wear the watch. I’m sure some would call this FRANKEN, but it’s my watch and I don’t care. Peter 0894E47E-01FD-44CE-8382-0331899BB4EE.jpeg 0ADBE883-BDD0-4B0D-8AAA-0825162D0C6A.jpeg
 

Jet Jetski

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1940 Movado Chronometer, 4 adjs. Belonged to an air gunner Flt. Sgt. from New Zealand who trained in Canada and then served with 149 Squadron in Suffolk, England, surviving the war despite a crash on landing in March 1941, that sadly killed one of his fellow aircrew. Demobbed as a Warrant Officer, he returned to NZ and married in '46. Only took 3 days to arrive from New Zealand!

movado10.jpg
 

Marcelo

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Hello all.

Not a common type of watch on this thread, but it is what I'm wearing today: a Casio W217.

Yes a digital, but this one pulled on my hearstrings. It reminds me of some watches I had in the late 1970s and early 80s when I was still a kid. It is larger than those though, has an interesting gold tinge to the screen, the digits are large and easy to read. Light, comfortable and fun, it gets a lot of time on my wrist.

Not for everyone of course, but for those of my vintage I believe it will bring on the nostalgia. At least for me it did. Enough so that it is my first digital in 30 years, my first watch purchase in over 15.


casio.jpeg
 
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musicguy

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It reminds me of some watches I had in the late 1970s and early 80s when I was still a kid.
I had one then and used it when I ran(to time myself). A very simple
Casio. I am going to have to get me one of them.


Rob
 
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Marcelo

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Definitely reminds me of the digital I had as a little guy.

Never did get my Nelsonic Game watch.... Only the cool kids had those ..
Ha!

I had one, but it didn't last long. My 3rd or 4th grade teacher confiscated it one day when I was playing in class. I took a long time to complain to my parents about it as I knew they wouldn't be happy about the situation. When I did and finally convinced them to go talk to the teacher, the watch was gone. Somehow it had disappeared from her drawer.

And no, my parents never got me another one.
 

Jet Jetski

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Hello all.

Not a common type of watch on this thread, but it is what I'm wearing today: a Casio W217.

Yes a digital, but this one pulled on my heartstrings. It reminds me of some watches I had in the late 1970s and early 80s when I was still a kid. It is larger than those though, has an interesting gold tinge to the screen, the digits are large and easy to read. Light, comfortable and fun, it gets a lot of time on my wrist.

Not for everyone of course, but for those of my vintage I believe it will bring on the nostalgia. At least for me it did. Enough so that it is my first digital in 30 years, my first watch purchase in over 15.


View attachment 611520
That's interesting, I am having a Sekonda Saturday, and this must be about '84 I think, from my college daze.

IMG_20200912_111635950(1)(1).thumb.jpg.2d9a16adc4d8723a3ec13ef5bd20e5c4.jpg
HAGD

J
 

musicguy

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So after reading Marcelo's post #2337 above I started searching for a similar watch to what I had
circa early 1980's. I loved it then. I found a lot of beat up ones for 50-60 bucks then I came across one that
was never used for $47.00 and I did a buy it now. It does not have a box or papers but there
isn't even a scratch on the crystal. I remember mine had quite a few and one deep gash.

This is what I'm wearing right now. Mine was probably like Marcelo's above
but I bought this version.


CASIO | DW-210
MODULE 548
WATER RESIST 200M
Casing Resin
24 hour time ability

RELEASED | 1982

IMG_6685.jpg


Rob
 

musicguy

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