What’s your preference

Duzzy

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Sep 29, 2018
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hi there,

I don’t know what clock to buy, I’m going new that’s what I’ve decided to do it just suits my situation better. What brand mechanism is your preference and what type chime rods? gongs? Bells?

Regards Darren
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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It's not easy to give any advice without any idea of what you want/need.

Are you looking for a wall clock, a bracket clock, a long case clock, spring driven, weight driven large, small? Please narrow the field down a little and more help may be forthcoming.

JTD
 

Les harland

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Apr 10, 2008
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What sort of clock are you looking for?
For example modern or old
A hundred years is nothing for a well made clock
There are quite a few around well into their third century
 

daveR

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Hi Darren, I'm sure people will have something to say here, but from the way I read your query I feel you are coming at it from the wrong end! Unless you have a specifici interest in mind which usually develops after you have a fewclocks (400day, vienna regulators, early english or maybe dial clocks to name a few) you probably should follow what the antique dealers will say which is buy what you like or what appeals to you. You have to live with it.Learn about what you get and in that process you will see what types of clocks there are and how they fit in and have been used. Then you will also see what you dont like. After that is also price and availability (and ebay!!) This is approximately what has been my path as well over the last 25 or so years.
I hope that helps a little, I know others here have very different paths.
David
 

Duzzy

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I’m building and designing a weight driven long case clock. Hope this narrows the field

Regards Darren
 

Walt Wallgren

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HI Darren,

Since you are designing and building a case, I presume you are wanting to build a piece that will become an heirloom. With that being said, I would recommend not buying a new movement. From what I have read and heard, the quality just isn't there in the new movements. They last 30 or 40 years and they are done. A good quality older movement has already outlasted a new one and will do so again many times over. You can find good, old movements at the marts, on Flea Bay, Clock Shops, etc.

I have a Gilbert spring driven tall clock from about 1910 and it keeps excellent time (1 or 2 min/month) and a Lenzkirch 2 weight from the 20's that does the same. I envision 2 possible stories: This is the case that Great-Great Grandpa built but the movement has been replaced a couple of times cause it wore out; or this is Great-Great Grandpa's clock. He built the case and put a really good antique movement in it and it is just as he built it.

In my totally biased opinion, I like story #2 much better.

Hope this helps,
Walt
 

upstateny

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Oct 2, 2015
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I agree with older movements however you may need to rebuild them which can add greatly to the investment. There are 20th century movements from Gerhardt Hartwig or David Lindow that equal the English movements made 200 years ago. Expensive but will last as long as any of the antique movements.

American movements made in the last part of the 19th century by Waltham and others may make a good choice.
 

brian fisher

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well, you already know my opinion and it mirrors what everyone else has said here. if it were me, I would probably buy an old 1910-1930 German 3 weight clock and rob the movement out of that for my project. once again, you do have to follow your own path. however, I do think that if If you do buy modern, you will greatly regret it one day.
 

mauleg

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Wait, didn't you get everything for this project already? :confused: Oh well, forging on...

I would suggest looking around, seeing what comes up and taking it from there
+1 for this.

Also, not to be morbid, but if inheritance is not an issue and you are old enough so that you're pretty sure that you will not be around 40 years from now, you may get the most enjoyment out of a modern movement that costs less than an antique.

If you like to tinker a lot, get a used and abused modern movement for many hours of edutainment and spread your spending out over time. You'll then collect tools and experience along the way and dive deeper down the horological rabbit hole.

To answer the specific questions:

  1. No real preference for a given maker; I look at the way it's put together, unique features, thickness of plates and whether or not it's below current market value.
  2. In terms of chimes "sounds good" is subjective. You need to go out and listen to know what you like.
 

Duzzy

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Thanks everyone, passing this clock on isn’t really an option and tinkering isn’t my thing it’s more the build and putting it in the clock etc
 

shutterbug

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This site might be something you would be interested in exploring.
 
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