Weule Bockenem Maintaining Power

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by Burkhard Rasch, Sep 11, 2016.

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  1. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    #1 Burkhard Rasch, Sep 11, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    in a small village in Lower Saxony called Drakenburg is a verry old rural church.On a bicycle-tour yesterday we found this interesting tower clock with a maintaining power device I haven't seen before.The mvmt. is signed Weule Bockenem 1887 (the manufacturer is well known in Germany) two trains,count wheel strike.
    Maintaining power is provided by a small weight (ca. 1-2 kilogramms) on a ca 40cm long rod attached to a shaft pivoted in the cast iron frame of the movement.The drop space of this weight lies between the first wheel and the back plate.Attached to this shaft are two other extensions: one bears a spring loaded swivel hook that interacts with the second wheel when working; the other rod shows an omega-shaped end that encircles the square end of the winding arbor.The original crank has a kind of hub that lifts up this end when the crank is pushed home on the arbor to wind the clock.By this,the system is activated,the swivel hook hooks on one tooth of the second wheel and pulls it down by the little weight attached to the shaft.
    The clock was freely accessable and I could try it out,it indeed worked.
    An interesting solution for a common problem.(hope You can understand my "explanation",pics will show tha rest)
    Enjoy!
    Burkhard

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  2. Jim DuBois

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    #2 Jim DuBois, Sep 11, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 11, 2016
    Very interesting approach. It is better executed than the usual method of applying maintaining power via the 2nd wheel. What I have seen in one or two tower clocks is a weight on a lever that requires the winder to physically lift it up and the hinged tooth will engage the wheel and will then disengage and fall away when the time advances. Hopefully the clock is fully wound by then. A similar method is on occasion used in tall clock works, usually 18th century and needed, following a conversion to dead beat escapement..

    I recently did a reconstruction of such a device on an American tall clock dating about 1775. It was entirely missing, so I needed to reconstruct an entirely undocumented mechanism working from nothing but the holes in the plates. It took a while but I ended up pretty much with a tall case sized version of the mechanism in the tower clock you show. I used a spring for power rather than a weight.

    An American version of the simplified 2nd wheel with pivoted weight mechanism can be found in a church clock attributed to Gawen Brown circa 1769. It requires the manual effort to engage it, unlike the much more sophisticated mechanism you show.
     

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  3. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    #3 Burkhard Rasch, Sep 11, 2016
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    indeed,that's the same principle!Thanks for sharing!
    Burkhard
     
  4. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    The impression I get from one description in this thread is of a "bolt and shutter" mechanism found on tall clocks.

    image.jpg
     
  5. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    #5 Burkhard Rasch, Sep 11, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    You nailed it ! I've often heard of bolt and shutter mechanism,but i`ve never seen one.Thanks for enlighten me!
    Burkhard
     
  6. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I think the original post states this maintaining power engages automatically, which is not the common approach on tower clocks. The insertion of the winding crank sets in place both the movement of the weight to a position where it provides power as well as engage it with the rest of the mechanism. One of those things easier said than done in many cases. The bolt and shutter mechanism in at least some tall clocks requires the person winding the clock to pull a lever or pull assembly which moves the shutters out of the way and at the same time moving the weight to a drive position and then engaging it. The mechanism Burkhard shows does it with no more than the insertion of the winding crank.
     
  7. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    #7 Burkhard Rasch, Sep 11, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Jim,to be honest: I´m not sure.The hub on the winding crank doesn't show any signs of wear and tear or scratches which it should if my primary assumption was correct that it "pushes" the omega-shaped end of the lever out of it's way.In fact the longer I think about it the more I´m convinced that the lever is supposed to be lifted manualy.The hub would only act as a "reminder" for the person winding the clock,the crank cannot be attached fully to the winding arbor as long as the lever is not lifted.I think it works that way.Sorry for any confusion caused by my nebulous description.
    Burkhard
     

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