Welch Marine balance wheel spring

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Bruce Barnes, Sep 21, 2012.

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  1. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Finally got this 1855 clock back together and running (lot of work and expletives),2nd bit is fine,calendar hand advances but running a little slow.When I reset the hairspring I tried to recall from memory the depth and then set the regulator in the neutral position.
    My question is, do I reposition the regulator 51_1.jpg and add more length to the spring,i.e., tighten the spring a little more?
    Thanks,
    Bruce
     
  2. Cactus50

    Cactus50 Registered User
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    Jan 28, 2001
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    Hi Bruce

    Yes, if everything else is good, shorten the balance spring slightly by inserting it further in the retainer and replacing the pin. Then you will need to rotate the collet do the wheel is back in the neutral position. It will bee a trial and error process until you get the desired result.
     
  3. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    everything operates as it should...............this clock mechanism was in pretty rough shape when I got it,rusty,bad bushings ,solder on the fly.brads used to secure the plates but one to learn on.Not quite sure exactly how to tweak this movement but I will follow your directions.
    I put everything back together as close to original and I may have been off.This spring has a brass shim that is used rather than a pin.
    Thanks for the help,
    Bruce
     
  4. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Aug 24, 2000
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    #4 eskmill, Sep 21, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2012
    Bruce wrote in part:"........This spring has a brass shim that is used rather than a pin."

    The stationary end of the balance spring or "hair-spring" is said to be "pinned" but the manner of "pinning" is varied from some kind of tapered pin in a slightly oversize hole to more commonly an elongated rectangular slot with a wedge shaped piece shaped to fit into the rectangular slot along with the outer end of the balance spring. Thus permitting an adjustment to assure the balance spring runs "true in the flat."

    Shorten the spring to go faster and assure that the spring, while in action, comes close to the regulator pins but only touches the regulator pins when the balance is fully rotating. A slight faster "tweak" can be achieved by closing the gap between the regulator pins....the opposite is also an option. But these "tweaks" should be made after the balance is put close to "in beat" by rotating the inner end of the balance spring collet on the balance wheel arbor. On many, there is an open slot in the collet made for the insertion of a wedge shaped tool to loosen the grip of the collet.

    Many repairers suggest not making the beat "perfect" on wall or stationary clocks so as to enable the escapement to start during winding. Not a requirement on small wall clocks such as the Welch "marine" and other such small wall clocks which are generally hand-held while winding the mainspring.
     
  5. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Thanks Les,the latter part of your first patagtaphy identified my "pinning" situation.
    After reaing the rest of your guidance,my heart is in my throat as I have never worked on this type of movement and I would hate to make an irreversible mistake.
    I will take it from the test stand and review the situation.
    Thanks again,
    Bruce
     
  6. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    Indeed Bruce. Rotating the hairspring collet to achieve an even beat is a task for keen eyes and steady hands with the timepiece movement held steady and firm. The collet clamping on the balance wheel arbor varies but if there's a slot its meant to have the taper of a small screwdriver jammed into that space while the balance wheel is rotated with a free hand. The idea is to work the force of the fingers holding the collet slightly loose against the force of the fingers on the other hand rotating the balance wheel in an opposite direction. The adjustment is one of trial and error with deep breathing.
     
  7. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Thanks Les, I will take a deep breath in the morning...........my last email looks like it was written after a fraternity party,apologies for poor typing.First task will be a repositioning of the hair spring.
    Bruce
     
  8. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Calif. USA
    Hi
    Don't try to rotate the collet with pliers, use a small screw driver blade
    in the slot.
    The blade puts just enough force on the collet to expand it so that it rotates
    without loosing tension to hold it. You can go back and forth without worrying
    about making it loose. Quite clever!
    Tinker Dwight
     

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