Weight of WW clock movement

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Frank Smallman, Oct 14, 2016.

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  1. Frank Smallman

    Frank Smallman Registered User
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    Nov 28, 2010
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    If you don't know the name of the movement; how do you determine the correct weight of the time and strike trains. I'm guessing it has to be 5 lbs or greater. Any info will be appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. gilbert

    gilbert Registered User
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    Aug 25, 2009
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    30 hour clock?
     
  3. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2005
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    Frank,

    It would help greatly if you could post pictures of the movement.

    Mike
     
  4. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    As others have said, a picture of your clock movement would be a great help. Lacking any additional information, a 30 hour movement with weight cord over just one pulley at the top of the clock will typically have about 3 to 3 1/2 lb. weight but may run with as little as 2 lb. if it is in perfect condition. A typical 8-day movement will likely have a compounded weight system with a pulley at the top of the clock and a pulley at the weight. Such a clock will probably want 8 to 12 lbs. weight and the strike side may or may not be the same as the time side. There are two easy ways to determine what the clock actually requires IF THE CLOCK IS KNOWN TO BE IN GOOD ORDER: 1) start with a weight that is too light and gradually increase until the clock runs well. 2) pull on the weight hook with a fish scale until you pull enough force to run the clock. If you can anchor the fish scale, then just wind the clock against the scale until there is enough force to run the clock. When it stops, read the scale and you will know that you probably need a pound or so more.

    RC
     
  5. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    As Mike suggests we need to know what clock you have. Depending on the maker, and if it is 30 hr or 8 day, the right weight could be as little 2.75 pounds or as much as 11 or 12 pounds. And in some clocks time side and strike side have different weight weights.....not to be repetitious or anything.
     

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