Weight Driven Clock Questions

JoyF

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I have an Eli Terry Jr. clock. When I wound it, the weights felt a bit light compared to other weight driven clocks I have dealt with. After being wound, the clock ticks for awhile then stops. Could the weights be too light or does the pendulum have anything to do with such?

Also, I am attaching pics of my Bridge, Peck, and Co. triple decker. The rod that the pendulum hangs on has come loose. Could anyone explain to me where it should be attached? Thanks. DSCN9094.jpg DSCN9095.jpg DSCN9097.jpg DSCN9098.jpg DSCN9099.jpg
 

hookster

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Regarding your second question, it attaches to the slotted post just above the hand shaft, with a tapered pin. It also has to go through the looped bottom part of the crutch. The reason that your other movement is stopping likely has nothing to do with the weights, and is more likely due to old dried out oil and grime in the pivot holes, in which case a proper cleaning and oiling, and perhaps some bushing work, is required. Both require disassembly. Having said that, the movement looks pretty clean from your pictures, and oiling of the pivot holes may suffice. These are very forgiving movements.
 

JoyF

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Thank you. The rod is attached and clock is running. I'm just missing the tapered pin to secure it.

I attached some pictures of the movement in the Eli Terry. It is a Waterbury movement. Is there any way to oil the pivot holes without disassembly and where are the pivot holes? DSCN9100[1].jpg DSCN9101[1].jpg DSCN9102[1].jpg DSCN9103[1].jpg
 

shutterbug

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The pivots are the rotation points of each wheel. You'll have to remove the movement from the case to oil each one. That might help for awhile, but you are probably needing a complete service - disassembly, clean, polish, bush, reassembly.
 

JoyF

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Can anyone tell me where I can get the proper size tapered pin for the Bridge, Peck, and Co. clock? Thanks.
 

David S

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If you don't intend doing a lot of clock repair, just use a piece of wire and bend the ends up so the "pin" can't come out.
 

Dick Feldman

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Hello Joy,

A knee jerk reaction to a clock not running is to clean and oil it.
But--why? This is not a logical solution. Seldom will only cleaning and oiling a clock movement result in a permanent lasting solution. Repair people do the C and O trick all the time and CHARGE big money for it. Sometimes Adjust is added to the list.

If the clock ticks for a short period of time, I would first check to see if the time train cord is fouled, which will cause no power to be delivered to the movement. One cannot expect a clock to run without some power. I would also check the “beat.” A clock that is horribly out of beat will not run, but may make ticking noise for a few moments. It may be the movement has worn enough that friction/wear is preventing the clock from running. There could be many other reasons the clock will not run. Cleaning and oiling will solve none of the above.

It is tough, if not impossible to trouble shoot your non-running clock from the information you gave. If you are interested in learning how to properly repair clocks, your local library could be a good source of reliable information.

Best Regards,

Dick
 

Neuron

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A knee jerk reaction to a clock not running is to clean and oil it. But--why? This is not a logical solution. Seldom will only cleaning and oiling a clock movement result in a permanent lasting solution...
Agreed. But doesn't it make sense to clean and lube the clock at the outset? Almost any clock will need that before you get around to doing further diagnostics and adjustments/repairs. Better to see how the clock runs (or doesn't) after you've cleaned and oiled the movement, right?
 

Randy Beckett

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Agreed. But doesn't it make sense to clean and lube the clock at the outset? Almost any clock will need that before you get around to doing further diagnostics and adjustments/repairs. Better to see how the clock runs (or doesn't) after you've cleaned and oiled the movement, right?
I have had better success by trying to get a movement running before disassembly. Applying solvent to all the pivots will generally free it up to running condition if lubrication is the problem. Once running, all adjustments can be made and the movement can be thoroughly evaluated. Once evaluated, the movement is disassembled, repairs made as required, cleaned, polished, reassembled, and oiled. Seldom is a problem overlooked.
 

shutterbug

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My personal approach (and it should be noted that it's just personal) is that I couldn't care less if the movement runs or not, or that it could be made to run with a clean and oil. I treat every movement the same. I let down the springs (if there are any) and rock the trains to see if there is undesirable movement of the pivots. If so, I make notes. Then I disassemble, clean, bush and adjust. Usually that will give me a working clock. If not, I'll consider other options..
 

hookster

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From the information provided, this movement may be relatively clean and may have no major bushing wear evident. The OP can reaffirm this by jiggling the two main winding wheels to see if the other pivots are 'jumping about' in their holes. My guess is (and at the risk of getting vilified on the thread) that this movement may run fine with just an external cleaning and oiling, and, as I said before, these types of early weight driven movements are very forgiving and run OK with a surprising degree of wear. Having said this, if the OP is a 'newbee', then weight driven ones like this are a good initial movement to gain experience on, if he decides to do a full tear down.
I have had better success by trying to get a movement running before disassembly. Applying solvent to all the pivots will generally free it up to running condition if lubrication is the problem. Once running, all adjustments can be made and the movement can be thoroughly evaluated. Once evaluated, the movement is disassembled, repairs made as required, cleaned, polished, reassembled, and oiled. Seldom is a problem overlooked.
 
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shutterbug

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Another area to look at is the pulley system. I recently worked on one where the top wooden pulley had a wallowed out hole almost 1/2" wide! The weight just couldn't fall with that much friction up above. I drilled out the hole, inserted a wooden plug, recentered the hole using the lathe and re-installed it. The lower pulley was totally missing, so I made one of those too. Running good again now.
 

JoyF

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The clock does run when it is ticking so it is getting some power. I just pushed the pendulum to get it moving, and the clock ran for about one or two minutes. I am a newbie, but my gut feeling is that it needs to be serviced well. I am going to look the movement over again and decide whether I want to get into oiling it myself or pass it on to someone else to do so. Thank you for your thoughts. Always welcome.
 

JoyF

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Thanks. This is probably a dumb question, but I had wound the clock completely. Now it won't run, and I would like to run it down so that the weights are at the bottom. Is there any easy way to do this since the clock will not run long on its own?
 

shutterbug

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There's a click that holds the wheel while you are winding it. It is held in place with a spring. You can take that spring off, and then while holding up on the weight, disengage the click and let the weight down slowly.
 

harold bain

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There's a click that holds the wheel while you are winding it. It is held in place with a spring. You can take that spring off, and then while holding up on the weight, disengage the click and let the weight down slowly.
Or you can remove the verge, and carefully allow the escapement to freewheel. Use a hand on the weight to control the speed of the release.
 

JoyF

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I was able to get the weight down. I popped the "click" (I think it was) up, then brought the weight down. I was then able to hold up on the spring and allow the "click" to move back into place. I don't know that is was the proper way to do it, but it is done. Thanks!
 

Neuron

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My personal approach (and it should be noted that it's just personal) is that I couldn't care less if the movement runs or not, or that it could be made to run with a clean and oil. I treat every movement the same. I let down the springs (if there are any) and rock the trains to see if there is undesirable movement of the pivots. If so, I make notes. Then I disassemble, clean, bush and adjust. Usually that will give me a working clock. If not, I'll consider other options..
I agree with your approach, and that's why I posted my question about the critical comment Re "knee jerk" cleaning and lubricating of clocks. Sure, if the clock just requires a "simple" adjustment of the pendulum regulator nut or crutch, and it otherwise looks good, I suppose it might not be necessary to clean and lubricate it. It may be that a clock doesn't absolutely need a proper C&L to get it to run...and some can be coaxed to run without that attention, especially if you know it's been recently serviced (properly) and just requires a simple adjustment. On the other hand clocks do require periodic C&L along with checks for wear on bushings and pivots. Even if I could get a stopped clock to run by just oiling some bushings or Duncan Swishing it, I'd want to properly check the movement, disassemble it, and lubricate it, and then make any necessary adjustments. At least I'd know that the C&L was taken care of and shouldn't be something to worry about shouldthe clock continue to misbehave.

I don't think that washing your car every time you repair a flat tire is a relevant comparison to cleaning a clock whenever you work on one. I can say that I'd be inclined to wash my car after fixing a flat if for no other reason than that I like to have a clean car...and in any case I would certainly do more than just repair the tire. I'd like to know why it went flat and make sure it doesn't happen again. And in the overall scheme of things washing the car is usually cheaper than fixing a flat and is considered to be good routine maintenance...
 

JoyF

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Jun 4, 2013
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I have an Eli Terry Jr. clock. When I wound it, the weights felt a bit light compared to other weight driven clocks I have dealt with. After being wound, the clock ticks for awhile then stops. Could the weights be too light or does the pendulum have anything to do with such?

Also, I am attaching pics of my Bridge, Peck, and Co. triple decker. The rod that the pendulum hangs on has come loose. Could anyone explain to me where it should be attached? Thanks. 207187.jpg 207188.jpg 207189.jpg 207190.jpg 207191.jpg
The movement pictured above. Can anyone tell me what kind of movement it is? Does it have rolling pinions? Thanks.
 

harold bain

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I suppose it would be called an Ives type brass strap movement. John Birge commonly used this type of movement in many his clocks. It might have rolling pinions. A close look at them should confirm whether it does or not.
 
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