Waterbury Heron Regulator Clock Movement Help

Danbri

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Jan 27, 2022
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Hello from Australia. I have a 12 inch dial Waterbury Heron regulator clock to be restored. It is an ex-government department clock. I have the case, dial, movement and the wooden pendulum and Bob. What I do not have is the suspension rod that the timber pendulum hangs from. I’ve been unable to find any photos on the Internet of a complete movement so I have no idea what suspension rod belongs there. I’ve attached photos of the clock, the movement and the pendulum. As best I can tell from my research the pendulum and bob are original.

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Jeff T

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Feb 10, 2018
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put your pendulum under the glass where it looks the best, measure from the stick to the suspension post that will get you close to the length you need it will the typical feather and rod
 

R. Croswell

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You can see a picture of a 12" Heron here: Antique Clock Details
The picture is for the time only version but perhaps it will give you some idea of where the pendulum might hang.

At the very minimum it looks like you will need to take this movement apart for cleaning. If you count the number of teeth on each wheel and pinion you can calculate the theoretical pendulum length.

RC
 

c.kugle

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Jul 15, 2021
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I agree with Jeff T but will add your pendulum needs to be in the middle of the adjustment range that way when you do your time trials you will have the maximum up and down adjustment range to dial the time in.. Chris.
 

demoman3955

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Apr 9, 2022
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Id like to know when its all back together what the gong sounds like. I had one rusted like that and it only had a flat thud sound until i put in a new one. Im wondering if its the rust that kills the temper, or if it was just a case of my gong just giving up.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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You can't tell by looking. It will be a wild guess on something that has to be
( + or - ) about 1/4".

You CAN tell by looking for ghost marks. These will often be on the case (or glass) and made usually by the pendulum rating nut. Or, they can be dents in the sides of your case, made by the bob.

Or, just make it long and adjust it using tape. Keep in mind what Chris just said about centering the rating nut on its threads.

Willie X
 
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Danbri

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Jan 27, 2022
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You can see a picture of a 12" Heron here: Antique Clock Details
The picture is for the time only version but perhaps it will give you some idea of where the pendulum might hang.

At the very minimum it looks like you will need to take this movement apart for cleaning. If you count the number of teeth on each wheel and pinion you can calculate the theoretical pendulum length.

RC
Yes, you are quite right- the movement definitely needs cleaning!
Thanks for the link.
 

Danbri

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Jan 27, 2022
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Id like to know when its all back together what the gong sounds like. I had one rusted like that and it only had a flat thud sound until i put in a new one. Im wondering if its the rust that kills the temper, or if it was just a case of my gong just giving up.
After reading your reply I went and checked the tone of my gong- it’s rusty and also sounds flat. It may be awhile before I get to clean it and let you know how it sounds.Can I still reply using this tread?
 

Danbri

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Jan 27, 2022
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Thanks for your reply. After reading it I had a closer look at th movement and the top of the timber that suspend the bob. The metalwork there will clearly fit
put your pendulum under the glass where it looks the best, measure from the stick to the suspension post that will get you close to the length you need it will the typical feather and rod
Thanks for the reply. I went and checked the top of the timber suspension rod and the metalwork there does look like it’s designed for the usual suspension rod ( with a spring/feather) by the look of it. Thanks for the heads up. I’m much more comfortable with how to restore this properly , thanks to you and the others who posted.
 

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