watchmakers lathe required

R

RJB

Can anyone tell me where to get the best price on a lathe? I'm just getting started, thanks, Rod
 
R

RJB

Can anyone tell me where to get the best price on a lathe? I'm just getting started, thanks, Rod
 

Robert M.

Registered User
Nov 20, 2004
1,114
3
0
Hi Rod:
Got my Peerless Lathe on ebay and I'm real happy with it.I got plenty of collets and other goodies with it and I think I gave about $500.00 for it.No complaints.
Check out the eMart on this site,there always seems to be a lathe or two on there,and don't forget the chapter marts held every six weeks or so,someone always has a lathe or two for sale at them.The regionals are even better.
If you're not a member of the association I would highly recommend that you join.It'll give you access to a ton of horological buying opportunities,well worth the dues.
I hope this was of some help to you.
Respectfully,Bob Fullerton
 
R

RJB

Thanks Bob, I'm not sure how comfortable I am with buying something like that on E-bay, I can't afford to get a lemon. Regards, Rod
 

John Echternach

NAWCC Member
Jul 27, 2003
157
0
16
Every time I see these lathe questions I have to add my 2 cents. I bought a brand new Taig lathe with the collet set (not WW collets)and some other acessories and it it is doing just fine as a lathe necessary to do basic clock work/repair. It is really more important how you do a "do-it-yourself customizing" job with this lathe. Get the Bob Tascione "Learn To Turn" tapes and J.M. Huckabee's book "The Top 300 Trade Secrets of a Master Clockmaker" from the NAWCC library and set the lathe up to do repair work using their ideas. Also I bought a Taig "Wood Turners Tool Rest" accessory and converted it into a tool rest for gravers (very easy!!) Also I adapted the Sherline 3-jaw chuck to fit the headstock (pricey but a nice small, hardened chuck). This is an inexpensive, brand new lathe. Also the accessories are very inexpensive. Go to the Nick Carter Tools website. He sells all Taig items at a 10% discount. Both Nick and his wife, Felice, are great to do business with. The only weak point are the collets. You can make all the different size collets you want (again, very inexpensive-40 cents each-but labor intensive). Any questions email me. John #0159010
 
G

Gnomon

For watch work, the Taig, or Sherline, with their ABEC 5 ball bearing headstock, will be a lemon. It's fine for clock work, but watches are much too tiny for all the rumble that a jobber grade ball bearing provides. A fair condition cone bearing, such as can be found on even the cheapest WW lathe has easily 1/100th the runout of the best ball bearing.

Food for thought.

-Chuck
 

John Echternach

NAWCC Member
Jul 27, 2003
157
0
16
The runout on the Taig headstock is reported to be better than .0005". The reports from the manufacturer and from users is that it usually exceeds that number(.0003" to .0005"). Chuck please know I am not disputing your comments, I am a brand new beginner to Horology and have only done clock work. I would enjoy some education on the differences between a suitable clockmakers' lathe and one for doing watchwork. Thank you. Sincerely John #0159010
 

harold

Registered User
Mar 12, 2001
752
5
18
Try Uncle Larry's on the internet. I deal with him and I know he has several for sale. Go to Google and you will find him. Great person to deal with.
 

bbwatch

Registered User
Dec 25, 2002
273
0
16
RJB - Try Harvey Schmidt at http://www.toolpin.com/.

He's very good, always has good equipment and is more than happy to help you. He also attends most of the big regionals, so you can see what he has if you can wait that long. Send him an email and find out where he will go next.

Barry B
 
G

Gnomon

Originally posted by John Echternach:
The runout on the Taig headstock is reported to be better than .0005". The reports from the manufacturer and from users is that it usually exceeds that number(.0003" to .0005").
Hi John,

My Southbend "Heavy 10" (10L) specs specs less run out than that! For those that don't know what a 10L is, it is a mid priced engine lathe with a 10 inch diameter swing. I wouldn't use it to replace a pivot on a watch.... Well, not anymore ;-)

The runout of a typical cone bearing is 1 or 2 /100,000ths of an inch. That is, 0.00001-2". The typical high quality ball bearing watch lathe, such as a Levin, will have 0.0001" maximum runout. Just as a point of reference, bearings of the same size and quality as those that go in a Levin lathe cost about $120 each. The Taig lathe, in a simple form, costs about $400. I rather doubt that they have spent 1/2 the sales price of the lathe in bearings.

Now, why do we care? Well, the runout of a cone bearing shows up as the spindle's mechanical axis revolving around the true rotational axis. The runout of a ball bearing is complex. You get an axial component that is just like the cone bearing's, but you also get a component that appears to be random, called rumble. Rumble is due to imperfections in the spherical nature of the individual balls.

The axial runout shows up as an eccentric offset when you take a round piece of stock, and turn a diameter. The rumble shows up as a rough surface finish. Both are show stoppers when you are trying to put a new pivot on the arbor of some wheel in a wrist watch.

[On the bright side, you can get some really cool looking moire patterns on a fine turning on a ball bearing lathe (using power
feed).]

It happens that the cheaper bearing (cone bearing) is the better bearing for a watch maker's lathe. Ball bearings are a better bearing for bigger lathes that take heavier spindle loads.

-Chuck
 
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Greg Crockett

Registered User
Apr 13, 2001
464
0
0
The lathes I most often use are an Atlas screw lathe, an 8mm watchmaker's lathe and a bow powered Jacot lathe. There is often some overlap in funcionality depending upon the work.

For alot of fine watch work, such as repivoting a staff, the motor may be turned off and the work done with dead centers. Dead centers can be turned up nicely on a motor powered lathe (even a cheap one). The fine work can then be done with the motor off and the work turned with a bow.

By making a study of the turns (watchmaker's bow lathe), I found that various dead center attachments and runners can be made by and for a powered lathe (even cheap ones) and then used for extra fine work. In fact, European WW 6mm and 8mm lathes often came with a full set of runners and other attachments of the type used in bow lathes. These dead center type attachements were often used by watchmakers who did not trust their finest work to a live spindle.

As for the purchase of a used WW lathe, it is hard going if you get one with a damaged spindle. All it takes is for someone to have dropped it once!

Before you buy, get a copy of THE WATCHMAKER'S LATHE by Ward Goodrich. The author describes some simple tests one can do to check the lathe before buying it. Given the amount of time you will spend with your lathe, it pays to go to a large regional and check several lathes before buying one.

Good luck.

Best regards,

Greg
 

tom stacy

Registered User
Mar 11, 2005
5
0
0
Tom Mister has always been good for me and is very knowlegble and always had good quality items. Also has a good selection of collets too.Respectivly Tom
 
R

RJB

THANKS FOR ALL YOUR REPLIES, MAYBE I'LL TRY A DIFFERENT TACK, DOES ANYONE HAVE A DECENT LATHE AT A REASONABLE PRICE? MY BROTHER & I ARE JUST GETTING INTO THIS. ROD
 

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