watch paper?

Discussion in 'Watch Repair' started by lloydh, Sep 6, 2012.

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  1. lloydh

    lloydh Registered User

    Aug 4, 2012
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    retired retail management
    Houston,Texas
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    Does anybody use anything other than watch paper for cleaning watches? that stuff is very expensive..thanks for the advise Lloyd
     
  2. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
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    Calgary, Alberta
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    Welcome,

    Watch paper for "cleanIng" watches? I have no clue as to how anyone might use watch paper (sometimes called bench tissue) to clean a watch. Please explain how you might use watch paper to clean a watch.
     
  3. davestanda

    davestanda Registered User

    May 23, 2011
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    watch paper is for handling watch parts..maybe for wiping of cleaning solution water,so you wouldn't get the lint or fibers from say a paper towel or cotton one....not oil ,,it would smear oil...i guess you could use wax paper...
     
  4. Albert Antonelli

    Albert Antonelli Registered User
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    Jan 8, 2011
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    When I started to apprentice under my fathers tuteledge my dad only cleaned all watches using watch paper to hold the parts that were in the watch cleaning material we used back then, and so did I. I still use watch paper naturally the watch cleaning solution has changed for the good or should I say more environmentally friendly today than when I worked with dad. I use it for holding all the watch parts and may I say I still get a kick cleaning a nice old pocket watch by hand, keeps the eye to hand going and of course the touch. Well that is my two cents worth.
     
  5. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
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    Bench tissue (watch paper) is often used for handling parts during repair. NOT for actually cleaning watches. An option might be finger cots which are available from material suppliers, but also from you local pharmacy where they are sold as protective covers for injured fingers. But I am certain finger cots could not be considered a cheaper alternative. I use bench tissue. A package of it lasts me for years. So I fail to see how the price could be considered a major concern!
     
  6. richiec

    richiec Registered User
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    Feb 24, 2007
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    automotive warranty inspector
    Brick, Ocean, NJ
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    I use watch paper for putting small parts on to make sure they are dried completely but use unpowdered latex gloves to handle watch parts, found finger cots cut off the circulation to my fingers.
     
  7. davestanda

    davestanda Registered User

    May 23, 2011
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    i use gloves,unpowdered ones from time to time...i usually wash the gloves (while on my hands) in the sink,then dry) i kinda don't like using gloves,you sort of lose some feel, i think anyway...so i use pegsticks and watch paper to handle the parts..i try my very best to just use the tweezers and sticks..the only time i really use the paper is when i am putting on the set lever....also,,you can get like a thousand sheets of watch paper for like eight bucks..it might seem alot for paper but it will probalby outlast you..if you think the watch paper is expensive,just wait....
     
  8. richiec

    richiec Registered User
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    Feb 24, 2007
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    Yeah, go buy an ear of corn these days, what happened to 13 for less than a buck? I get better feel out the gloves than the cots, the gloves don't cut off the circulation and don't tear as readily and can be reused many times.
     
  9. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

    Apr 15, 2005
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    Never heard/read/seen watch paper.

    Anybody willing to post a pic of some of it? Maybe a pic of the box so we can see brand name etc...
     
  10. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

    Dec 7, 2011
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    watchmaker
    sydney Australia
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    http://www.jewelerssupplies.com/Anti-Tarnish-Watch-Paper.html

    never been able to buy it here, I just use acid free jewellers tissue paper cut up into squares, it's used in the jewellery trade to wrap up items, it won't tarnish silver items, bangles, chains, rings etc.

    my first boss was American and he had a few sheets of watch paper left in a box, as far as I could tell it looked the same as the acid free tissue paper
     
  11. ben_hutcherson

    ben_hutcherson Registered User
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    Jul 15, 2009
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    I'm trying to figure out how this is "expensive"

    The stuff at the above Cas-Ker link is $4.75/1000. Jules Borel catalogs it in two sizes, with no brand name given but listed as "domestic." The 4"x4" stuff is $5.80/1000 and the 4 1/4"x4 1/4" is $11.75/1000.

    When I bought my tools, I "inherited" a half-used box of watch paper. I also ordered two boxes of my own. Two years later, I'm still working out of that first half-full box. To be fair, I'm very frugal with the stuff and usually only use one fresh sheet per watch for handling the clean parts(the older sheets get recycled for dirtier and dirtier jobs). Even if I used the higher priced Jules Borel large size paper and used 2 sheets/watch, that still amounts to $.02 per watch. The cheap Cas-Ker stuff used at 1 sheet/watch amounts to a half cent per watch serviced. Compared to the other consumables used in watch repair, this is an insignificant cost.
     
  12. davestanda

    davestanda Registered User

    May 23, 2011
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    i never tried just the finger cots.....i didn't know you could get them at the drugstore for injuries...another reason i don't like gloves are because they make my hands sweat..just times though i do cheap out sometimes..but only on the simple items...like poly sticks or or other things..but a large majority of the time i buy the best i can afford.....
     
  13. SpontaneousAcquisition

    SpontaneousAcquisition Registered User

    Aug 19, 2012
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    President, CEO, & Grunt of a local Appliance Repai
    South Carolina
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    What about using white cotton gloves, for the larger parts of course, plates, etc, combined with tweezers? We used finger cots in tantalum capacitor manufacturing to keep finger contaminates off the parts.
     
  14. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Hi,

    Isn't there a potential problem with cotton gloves shedding fibres?

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  15. SpontaneousAcquisition

    SpontaneousAcquisition Registered User

    Aug 19, 2012
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    President, CEO, & Grunt of a local Appliance Repai
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  16. davestanda

    davestanda Registered User

    May 23, 2011
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    i have seen something like that.i've seen major watch co.s use them....if they are lint free i guess there wouldn't be a problem that is the problem with cotton,the lint....btw,your link is broken...
     
  17. ben_hutcherson

    ben_hutcherson Registered User
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    Jul 15, 2009
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    I have used cotton gloves in the past, but one of the problems I've had with them is a loss of sensation even when using very "thin" gloves.

    I find it VERY difficult to exercise the motor control really needed to handle and manipulate watch parts when wearing cotton gloves.
     
  18. Al J

    Al J Registered User

    Jul 21, 2009
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    I use finger cots. They come in different sizes, so it's pretty easy to find a size that won't cut off the criculation in your fingers, unless you have extremely large fingers I guess. I originally used latex, but found they would make the skin red after a full day at the bench, and now I use a non-allergenic type.

    I do have watch paper, and use it for a few things, but not really for handling watch parts. I've never found it expensive either.

    Cheers, Al
     
  19. Watchfixer

    Watchfixer Registered User

    Jun 11, 2011
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    Which color is these non-allegenic finger cots? And how many cots to a package and how much, usually?

    Cheers, Watchfixer
     
  20. Al J

    Al J Registered User

    Jul 21, 2009
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    The last bag I ordered through Omega, they are pink, and the cost was about $48 for 720.

    However when I was at Omega for co-axial training, they suggested getting the Nitrile antistatic finger cots from McMaster-Carr.

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#finger-cots/=j9c1bj

    They are a bit cheaper there, and are white.

    Cheers, Al
     

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