Watch chains

tgeekb

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I apologize if this is not a subject relevant to the forums. I don’t see people talking about chains and wondered if anyone wanted to post pics of theirs. Are there documents or websites to learn more about vintage chains?
Here’s one I just purchased for my newly acquired Elgin 241.

3B7D3A42-0CA9-44EA-A3C7-5C030C8DAAA4.jpeg 3369F0C3-DDE8-4D83-9F02-3E938A74320C.jpeg
 

Rick Hufnagel

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richiec

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I will upload a photo when I get a chance of my favorite that my wife had made for me in 2008 of diamonds and 14K gold, back when we were both working and making good money.
 

Clint Geller

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I have a couple of chains that came with watches I purchased that I find especially interesting, because they are likely to have been worn together by the original owners. These are 1) a 14K gold chain and original gold key that came with an A. P. Walsh pocket chronometer date marked 1859 that was sold by Samuel Hammond & Co. of NY City, and 2) a silver chain with onyx spinner that came with a coin silver Waltham Wm. Ellery grade Model 1857 that was carried by Lt. Colonel Elial Foote Carpenter, C.O. of the 112th NY Infantry,. when he was mortally wounded in action in May of 1864 near Drury's Bluff along the James River in Virginia.
Walsh Movement.jpg Walsh Case Front.jpg Walsh watch and chain.jpg Walsh Dial - 1.jpg
 

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S_Owsley

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Thanks for creating this thread. I hope to learn a few things. It's a topic I've wanted to see discussed.
 
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musicguy

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I have a watch in my pocket every day and it's usually on this heavy silver chain.
I've been wearing this ATC 17j for a few weeks and it's only off 30 seconds from
when I first set it.

IMG_7355.jpg




Rob
 

Ethan Lipsig

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Because I don't carry my watches, I don't collect chains. Nevertheless, a fair number of the watches in my collection came with chains, which I believe generally were acquired by the watches' original owners at the time they acquired the watches. These watches (all solid 14k or 18 gold except as noted) are:
  1. A platinum Audemars Piguet
  2. An Elgin Grade 190
  3. A Charles Frodsham "Arnold"
  4. A Hamilton 400 Pulitzer
  5. A Hamilton 900
  6. A Hamilton 902
  7. A Hamilton 904
  8. A Hamilton 922MP
  9. A platinum Illinois 439
  10. An Illinois 528 Illini
  11. An onyx diamond and gold IWC
  12. An A. Lavalette
  13. A platinum Longines
  14. An enameled gold C.H. Meylan
  15. A TIffany PL C.H. Meylan
  16. A platinum C.H. Meylan
  17. A Patek Philippe
  18. A Tiffany PL Touchon
  19. Another Tiffany PL Touchon
  20. A platinum Touchon
  21. A gold and platinum Touchon
  22. A platinum and diamond Touchon
  23. A V&C
  24. A Waltham Riverside A
  25. A Matelene cigar-cutter-cased Waltham
These watches comprise about 6% of my collection, which only consists of high-grade non-RR watches. That suggests that most pocket watches of this type were not paired with chains or that prior owners have disposed of the most of the paired chains. I am guessing that a combination of those factors is why such a small percentage of watches in my collection have chains.

Also possibly probative are the percentages of watches with chains for makers of which I have sizeable collections:
  • 1 of my 41 Elgins has a chain: 2.4%
  • 5 of my 17 Hamiltons have chains: 29.4%
  • 1 of my 33 IWCs has a chain: 3%
  • 3 of my 44 C.H. Meylans have chains: 6.8%
  • 1 of my 12 Patek Philippes has a chain: 8.3%
  • 5 of my 26 Touchons have chains: 19.2%
  • 1 of my 17 V&Cs has a chain: 5.9%
  • 2 of my 38 Walthams have chains: 5.3%
The two outliers are Hamilton and Touchon, especially Hamilton. I speculate that these makes may have more often been marketed with chains than the other makes.

I'd be interested in information that bears of the frequency with which pocket watches were sold with chains or paired with chains by their original owners, and why few pairings seem still to exist.

Finally, here are a few chain photos.

IWC (#11 on the preceding list)

Z IWC Onyx 1.jpg IWC Onyx 2.jpg

C.H. Meylan (#14 on the preceding list)

IMG_4239.JPG IMG_4238.JPG

Patek Philippe (#17 on the preceding list)

IMG_9271_edited.JPG IMG_9273_edited.JPG

Platinum Touchon (#20 on the preceding list)

IMG_3017.JPG IMG_3019.JPG
 

Clint Geller

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Because I don't carry my watches, I don't collect chains. Nevertheless, a fair number of the watches in my collection came with chains, which I believe generally were acquired by the watches' original owners at the time they acquired the watches. These watches (all solid 14k or 18 gold except as noted) are:
  1. A platinum Audemars Piguet
  2. An Elgin Grade 190
  3. A Charles Frodsham "Arnold"
  4. A Hamilton 400 Pulitzer
  5. A Hamilton 900
  6. A Hamilton 902
  7. A Hamilton 904
  8. A Hamilton 922MP
  9. A platinum Illinois 439
  10. An Illinois 528 Illini
  11. An onyx diamond and gold IWC
  12. An A. Lavalette
  13. A platinum Longines
  14. An enameled gold C.H. Meylan
  15. A TIffany PL C.H. Meylan
  16. A platinum C.H. Meylan
  17. A Patek Philippe
  18. A Tiffany PL Touchon
  19. Another Tiffany PL Touchon
  20. A platinum Touchon
  21. A gold and platinum Touchon
  22. A platinum and diamond Touchon
  23. A V&C
  24. A Waltham Riverside A
  25. A Matelene cigar-cutter-cased Waltham
These watches comprise about 6% of my collection, which only consists of high-grade non-RR watches. That suggests that most pocket watches of this type were not paired with chains or that prior owners have disposed of the most of the paired chains. I am guessing that a combination of those factors is why such a small percentage of watches in my collection have chains.

Also possibly probative are the percentages of watches with chains for makers of which I have sizeable collections:
  • 1 of my 41 Elgins has a chain: 2.4%
  • 5 of my 17 Hamiltons have chains: 29.4%
  • 1 of my 33 IWCs has a chain: 3%
  • 3 of my 44 C.H. Meylans have chains: 6.8%
  • 1 of my 12 Patek Philippes has a chain: 8.3%
  • 5 of my 26 Touchons have chains: 19.2%
  • 1 of my 17 V&Cs has a chain: 5.9%
  • 2 of my 38 Walthams have chains: 5.3%
The two outliers are Hamilton and Touchon, especially Hamilton. I speculate that these makes may have more often been marketed with chains than the other makes.

I'd be interested in information that bears of the frequency with which pocket watches were sold with chains or paired with chains by their original owners, and why few pairings seem still to exist.

Finally, here are a few chain photos.

IWC (#11 on the preceding list)

View attachment 685569 View attachment 685568

C.H. Meylan (#14 on the preceding list)

View attachment 685578 View attachment 685577

Patek Philippe (#17 on the preceding list)

View attachment 685570 View attachment 685571

Platinum Touchon (#20 on the preceding list)

View attachment 685573 View attachment 685574
Ethan, I'd be surprised if many of your watches ever were worn by their original owners without chains. An alternative explanation for the low percentage of watches in your very impressive collection that came to you along with chains is that until these watches became collectables, whether or not an old watch had its original chain may not have mattered that much to most subsequent owners. So great pains may not have been taken to keep watches and original chains together. The immediate descendants of the original owners might have cared about these things, but by the time collectors get a chance to buy these watches, those heirloom ties likely were long since broken. Moreover, the kind of watches you collect mostly were originally owned by affluent individuals who may have accumulated several watch chains and perhaps even several watches over their lives, almost like tie clips, cuff links, or fountain pens. That might have been a lot for an heir to keep track of.
 
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PW Collector

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This is a double-albert pocket watch chain with a rotating photo cube (4 photos with beveled glass, silver sides).
The photo cube measures 14.7mm x 10.5mm. The photos are 10.7mm x 10.1mm.
The photo #1 above is:
Wilhelm I; Kaiser Wilhelm I; full name Wilhelm Friederick Ludwig, born March 22, 1797, died March 9, 1888.
He was the King of Prussia from January 2, 1861 to March 9, 1888.
He was the first German Emperor from January 18, 1871 to March 9, 1888.

The photo #2 above is:
Frederick III, born October 18, 1831, died June 15, 1888. Son of Wilhelm I.
Kaiser Frederick III, German Emperor; King of Prussia March 9 - June 15, 1888. He had been Crown Prince for 27 years before his short reign as King of Prussia which was cut short from unsuccessful treatments for cancer of the larynx.

The photo #3 above is:
Wilhelm II, Freiderk Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, son of Frederick III, born January 27, 1859, died June 4, 1941.
He was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom Of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the grandson of the British Queen Victoria.

The photo #4 above possibly is:
Tsarevich Alexei Nicolaevich, son of Nicholas II, Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias from November 1, 1894 - March 15, 1917.

The double-albert pocket watch chain is silver marked (lion facing left), on all the chain links, clasps & T-bar.
London Date Letter D dating 1799
Makers mark of: H B & S; Herbert Bushell & Sons

Dave

0B5A0BE5-19A7-4749-AC78-0160D003D89B.jpeg D2C59A82-D221-4C53-B283-407940E6D6EE.jpeg FF1FD4FA-BE38-4DA5-9552-5880FC3FBED4.jpeg A10828A6-9A99-4107-94C7-3305DE076E79.jpeg 8CFE25E6-C281-4755-BB42-A30C6C2A004C.jpeg 4DB42981-4D78-43D7-A581-DFF700819C3B.jpeg C2A160F2-A294-4587-BDE6-A5E56E8F9BC6.jpeg
 

musicguy

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Rob
 

Jerry Treiman

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This is one of my favorite dress pocket watches, which came to me with what I believe to be its original watch chain. The case is 14K green gold and platinum and is nicely matched by the green gold and platinum chain. The watch is a Waltham 10-size Colonial-A
5859f.jpg

Also, let's not forget the ladies. Here are some pendant watches in my collection (all Walthams) with their matching chains -
957_b5.jpg 1204_b4.jpg 1610b3.jpg
 

tgeekb

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This is one of my favorite dress pocket watches, which came to me with what I believe to be its original watch chain. The case is 14K green gold and platinum and is nicely matched by the green gold and platinum chain. The watch is a Waltham 10-size Colonial-A
View attachment 685671
Jerry, is there a name for this style watch Chain?
 
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PatH

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I don't use these with watches, but I do like to see different examples of watch chains. Here are some of the examples I've found. All of these are "as found" so a couple don't have all the correct hooks or clips.
  • The first is made of bakelite, so is very lightweight.
  • Equestrian theme that goes well with an equestrian theme watch stand that I found.
  • Like Jerry, I have some for ladies' watches, too. I do wear these, as well as watch brooches, occasionally.
  • The next two would hang from a chain, rather than being considered the chain itself.
  • The two top in this photo have locket fobs, while the bottom two have keys. The bottom was the first key that I bought. The chain was attached, so a bonus. It's bakelite, or some other form of plastic, and the key has an agate cut cross grain so there is a thin white stripe across the center of the black stone. This was my first foray into the wonderful world of pocket watches and their "go-withs"!
Are there documents or websites to learn more about vintage chains?
I'm not aware of any books or websites (other than this forum) that address watch chains. The book "How the Watch Was Worn" by Genevieve Cummings has excellent pictures of watches, chains, keys, etc., including period pictures of people wearing them, along with a nice history and some period catalog pages. The book is rather pricey, but if you're interested and are an NAWCC member, you should be able to check out a copy of the book from the NAWCC library.

DSC04289.JPG DSC04285.JPG DSC00202.JPG DSC00228.JPG DSC00230.JPG
 

Jerry Treiman

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Jerry, is there a name for this style watch Chain?
The simple watch chain, with spring ring on one end and spring hook at the other, is usually around 13 or 14 inches long and was referred to as a Waldemar chain. If I am wearing mine with a vest the watch is in one pocket, the chain goes across through a button hole and I might have a pen knife or charm on the other end. If I am wearing the watch in a pants pocket I just double the chain back with both ring and hook at the watch.
 
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tgeekb

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The simple watch chain, with spring ring on one end and spring hook at the other, is usually around 13 or 14 inches long and was referred to as a Waldemar chain. If I am wearing mine with a vest the watch is in one pocket, the chain goes across through a button hole and I might have a pen knife or charm on the other end. If I am wearing the watch in a pants pocket I just double the chain back with both ring and hook at the watch.
I was wondering specifically about the style. The ones with long sections connected by a ring, such as below.

F0158F69-96AE-48CF-B364-851EAD77B979.jpeg
 

Jerry Treiman

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It appears to have been very common for Waldemar chains to have long links connected by one to three small links, but I do not see distinct names applied to any of the multitude of patterns available. Waldemar chains were also made with uniform links. I looked at chains in 1924 and 1926 catalogs.
 
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DesertChick

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This is a double-albert pocket watch chain with a rotating photo cube (4 photos with beveled glass, silver sides).
The photo cube measures 14.7mm x 10.5mm. The photos are 10.7mm x 10.1mm.
The photo #1 above is:
Wilhelm I; Kaiser Wilhelm I; full name Wilhelm Friederick Ludwig, born March 22, 1797, died March 9, 1888.
He was the King of Prussia from January 2, 1861 to March 9, 1888.
He was the first German Emperor from January 18, 1871 to March 9, 1888.

The photo #2 above is:
Frederick III, born October 18, 1831, died June 15, 1888. Son of Wilhelm I.
Kaiser Frederick III, German Emperor; King of Prussia March 9 - June 15, 1888. He had been Crown Prince for 27 years before his short reign as King of Prussia which was cut short from unsuccessful treatments for cancer of the larynx.

The photo #3 above is:
Wilhelm II, Freiderk Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, son of Frederick III, born January 27, 1859, died June 4, 1941.
He was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom Of Prussia from June 15, 1888 to November 9, 1918. He was the grandson of the British Queen Victoria.

The photo #4 above possibly is:
Tsarevich Alexei Nicolaevich, son of Nicholas II, Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias from November 1, 1894 - March 15, 1917.

The double-albert pocket watch chain is silver marked (lion facing left), on all the chain links, clasps & T-bar.
London Date Letter D dating 1799
Makers mark of: H B & S; Herbert Bushell & Sons

Dave

View attachment 685657 View attachment 685658 View attachment 685659 View attachment 685660 View attachment 685663 View attachment 685664 View attachment 685669
That is some amazing history you have there!
 

DesertChick

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This is one of my favorite dress pocket watches, which came to me with what I believe to be its original watch chain. The case is 14K green gold and platinum and is nicely matched by the green gold and platinum chain. The watch is a Waltham 10-size Colonial-A
View attachment 685671

Also, let's not forget the ladies. Here are some pendant watches in my collection (all Walthams) with their matching chains -
View attachment 685672 View attachment 685673 View attachment 685674
Lovely guilloche enamel on the ladies' watches! They are very difficult to find now and quite expensive!
 

iamweiss

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I have a watch in my pocket every day and it's usually on this heavy silver chain.
I've been wearing this ATC 17j for a few weeks and it's only off 30 seconds from
when I first set it.

View attachment 685550



Rob
These chains are very interesting. However, none of them have a winder key attached. Is that because winder keys were kept 'at home' and not necessary needed at other times?

Martin
 

musicguy

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keys were not usually on the Chain, but I have seen some older ones with keys. You need
to remember that many of the watches above are not key wind. Key wind watches
stayed around for a while but by the 1880's they were absolutely old technology
but some were still made.

I assume people kept their key at home for safe keeping (unless they were traveling), I would be curious about
other opinions.

EDIT: Now that you reminded me about that particular Waltham (when you quoted me) I think
I will wear it tomorrow.

Rob
 

PatH

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In case anyone is interesting, here is a link to some pictures of men wearing watches on chains, with key, and in some cases also fobs, visible on their chains. I just noticed that I had attached one (the sixth picture), where the man actually has what appears to be glasses rather than a key. I had forgotten that one was not a key. Women also attached their keys to chains at times, but these pictures are men's chains/keys.
 

viclip

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From the 1500s until the time that key wind/set pocket watches were largely abandoned in favour of those with keyless works, the key was commonly carried with the watch, esp. following the reign in the 1600s of King Charles of England (I forget whether it was headless Charlie I or the restored Charlie II) who introduced vests into the world of men's fashion. Having at least 2 pockets, one vest pocket was used for the watch & the other for the key. The chain would be double length so to speak (vs. the single chain which is only about 12-14 inches long) & would be affixed at its center point to a vest button or button hole, or else it would simply be snaked through one of the vest button holes.

In those old photos showing vested men sporting double chains, the watch would be in one vest pocket & the watch's key would generally be in the other. This would keep the watch & key together both to prevent loss of the key as well as to facilitate re-setting the hands or even winding the watch up in the middle of the day.

Alternatively, in a world in which vests aren't all that popular any more, a single chain can easily have a subsidiary chain attached to it so as to hold the key (instead of some decorative fob). Such subsidiary chain should of course be of sufficient length so that the watch can be handily wound or set.

Personally I prefer sporting a vest when carrying one of my key wind/set watches, with the watch & key at their respective opposite ends of a double chain.

Except in July/August when it's too darned hot to wear a vest so during the summer months I manage to find a keyless pocket watch or two to carry.
 

PatH

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Kent, thank you so much for the link to the Watch Chain Encyclopedia article. If I'd seen it before, I sure don't remember. Lots of great information. Another wonderful reference that you might like to add is "How the Watch Was Worn: A Fashion for 500 Years" by Genevieve E. Cummins. It looks like the NAWCC Library and Research Center has a couple of copies.
 

svenedin

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From the 1500s until the time that key wind/set pocket watches were largely abandoned in favour of those with keyless works, the key was commonly carried with the watch, esp. following the reign in the 1600s of King Charles of England (I forget whether it was headless Charlie I or the restored Charlie II) who introduced vests into the world of men's fashion. Having at least 2 pockets, one vest pocket was used for the watch & the other for the key. The chain would be double length so to speak (vs. the single chain which is only about 12-14 inches long) & would be affixed at its center point to a vest button or button hole, or else it would simply be snaked through one of the vest button holes.

In those old photos showing vested men sporting double chains, the watch would be in one vest pocket & the watch's key would generally be in the other. This would keep the watch & key together both to prevent loss of the key as well as to facilitate re-setting the hands or even winding the watch up in the middle of the day.

Alternatively, in a world in which vests aren't all that popular any more, a single chain can easily have a subsidiary chain attached to it so as to hold the key (instead of some decorative fob). Such subsidiary chain should of course be of sufficient length so that the watch can be handily wound or set.

Personally I prefer sporting a vest when carrying one of my key wind/set watches, with the watch & key at their respective opposite ends of a double chain.

Except in July/August when it's too darned hot to wear a vest so during the summer months I manage to find a keyless pocket watch or two to carry.
Yes but since you mention the U.K., here a vest is an undergarment worn under a shirt. A waistcoat is what a pocket watch is worn with. Here a single chain is usually called a Single Albert and a double chain a Double Albert after Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s husband. Sometimes a Double Albert has a sliding t-bar and sometimes they are fixed. The extra short length of chain on a Single or Double Albert is called a “drop”. Keys were most definitely carried on the chain. Why else would they have a ring to clip them to the chain? Keys were often decorated with gold or inset with precious stones. The other end of a double chain was often used for other useful items: a small folding pocket knife, a compass, a cigar cutter, a Vesta for matches, a holder for gold Sovereigns etc etc. The drop could be used for a lucky charm, medallion (sometimes a sporting medal), or a spinner (a semi-precious stone in a reversible setting with one type of precious stone on one side and a different one on the reverse). The American chain often used bolt rings to secure them. These were used in the U.K. (I have one) but more often they use t-bars.

The idea of an American wearing his pocket watch in his vest and pants is very amusing to a British person since both of these items of clothing are underwear in British English. It conjurs an image of a semi-nude person wearing a pocket watch!
 
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svenedin

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I didn’t mention that there are collectors of ornamental keys as well as the various fob ornaments and accoutrements for the other waistcoat pocket. These (usually gentleman’s) accoutrements are usually in silver but can be also be found in gold (though less common).
 

musicguy

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Every once in a while I see a key I feeI I must have, but then I
realize that it will take away from my pocket watch money.
There are some really fantastic ones out there.


Rob
 
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svenedin

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Every once in a while I see a key I feeI I must have, but then I
realize that it will take away from my pocket watch money.
There are some really fantastic ones out there.


Rob
I only have one really nice key but I wear it with the watch it winds. I will post some of my chains when I get a chance to take photographs.
 

svenedin

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A few of my watch chains. Gold ones to start with. I realise this is an American thread but there is no thread for pocket watches (general).

A Lange & Söhne pocket watch (circa 1912) in 18ct yellow gold with 2x Single Albert 9ct chains.

IMG_9002.jpeg

The same watch with a 14ct yellow gold "American" type chain with a bolt ring to attach to a button hole or behind a button.

IMG_9025.jpeg

A Mid-Nineteenth Century French cylinder in 18ct gold with its gold key inset with a semi-precious stone

IMG_9026.jpeg

A 1930's JW Benson in 9ct rose gold with a 9" medium weight rose gold Single Albert without additional drop

IMG_9028.jpeg

A 9ct rose gold half-hunter by Vertex (1951) with a heavy, graduated link, rose gold 9ct Single Albert with extra drop.

IMG_9027.jpeg
 

svenedin

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And some silver chains:

A lightweight Sterling silver chain with a silver Omega

IMG_9030.jpeg

A silver half-hunter by Payne and Co with a medium weight Sterling silver chain with an additional short drop

IMG_9031.jpeg

A heavy Sterling silver pocket watch by Bravingtons with a correspondingly heavy Sterling silver, trombone link chain

IMG_9032.jpeg

Finally, not a chain but for completeness.....A JW Benson in Sterling silver with a "Bow Saver" as made by David Boettcher (Vintage Watch Straps) with Sterling silver fittings and an additional clip.

IMG_9029.jpeg
 

PatH

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Stephen, it's great to see the chains with watches. Thanks for posting them. I have chains, brooches, keys, fobs and watch stands/holders, advertisements, trade cards, etc. but, with the exception of some of the dollar watch predecessors, very few contemporary watches that go with them. It's nice to see examples pop up here on the Forums.
 
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svenedin

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Stephen, it's great to see the chains with watches. Thanks for posting them. I have chains, brooches, keys, fobs and watch stands/holders, advertisements, trade cards, etc. but, with the exception of some of the dollar watch predecessors, very few contemporary watches that go with them. It's nice to see examples pop up here on the Forums.
You're welcome Pat. I have very little to no interest in wristwatches and I wear a pocket watch every day so chains are essential for me! I will wear a. pocket watch in a waistcoat, a jacket pocket, in Summer in the pocket of my shorts or even in the top pocket of my pyjamas.........
 
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Clint Geller

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Well, here is a great watch and chain I just picked up. The watch is an English lever fusee signed for F. H. Clark & Co., of Memphis Tennessee on the movement and the dial, in a Sterling silver hunting case London datemarked 1858-59. The silver chain with shepherd's hook garment fastener carries a fob bearing the rank, unit, and combat summary for Captain William Wesley Mosier of the Union First (East) Tennessee Cavalry, Company G. I'll have more to say about the watch, the man, his unit, and their war history when my watchmaker is done servicing the watch.

watch and chain -2.jpg fob -1.jpg fob -2.jpg inner rear lid.jpg
 
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svenedin

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Well, here is a great watch and chain I just picked up. The watch is an English lever fusee signed for F. H. Clark & Co., of Memphis Tennessee on the movement and the dial, in a Sterling silver hunting case London datemarked 1858-59. The silver chain with shepherd's hook garment fastener carries a fob bearing the rank, unit, and combat summary for Captain William Wesley Mosier of the Union First (East) Tennessee Cavalry, Company G. I'll have more to say about the watch, the man, his unit, and their war history when my watchmaker is done servicing the watch.

View attachment 719093 View attachment 719094 View attachment 719095 View attachment 719096
What a remarkable find!! The fob has 3 holes but only needs one for the current chain. I wonder what the other holes were for? I wonder whether the fob originally had an additional suspension loop attached to the 2 lower holes.
 

Clint Geller

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What a remarkable find!! The fob has 3 holes but only needs one for the current chain. I wonder what the other holes were for? I wonder whether the fob originally had an additional suspension loop attached to the 2 lower holes.
Hi Svenedin, it is likely that the fob was originally a favorite part of Mosier's corps badge that was converted to a watch fob so he could wear it every day after the war. Officers' corps badges were made by jewelers and often were personalized. This piece of Mosier's badge clearly was added sometime after December 1864, as that is the date of the latest battle listed on it, Nashville, and probably very soon after that date. It would originally have hung from short chains fastened to the two now empty holes. The hole at top was drilled so it could be used as a watch fob. This was a fairly commonplace practice.

There are some quaint errors in the place names on the fob, also common in the period: Mossy Creek, Pulaski, Campbellsville, and La Vergne are all misspelled on it.
 
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Jerry Treiman

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Matching a chain to a two-tone case is particularly gratifying. Here we have a chain with alternating links of rose gold and green gold worn with a similar Waltham with rose and green gold elements. (The watch is a 14-size Colonial-A Riverside in a custom case by H.W.Matalene)
3972b&chain.jpg 3972&chain.jpg
 

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